Is there any reason to keep this antenna?


Hi,
I have one of these puppies on my roof (the picture is not of my roof).
http://www.popsci.com/files/imagecache/article_image_large/files/articles/antenna_roof.jpg
that is currently serving no function as I have cable. It does serve as a convenient ledge for birds with all the predictable consequences. Is there any reason whatsover to keep the antenna there, e.g. for a broadcast HD tv signal, or can I remove it without any future regrets?
Thanks!
Aaron
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 18 Jul 2008 17:51:54 -0700 (PDT), Aaron Fude

What do you plan to do when your cable isn't working?
And are you sure your cable has all the stations your antenna has?
In Baltimore, that's not the case. When the Orioles or the Ravens are on tv, and you don't want to watch, cable doesn't have the DC stations, but my antenna gets them fine.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
No reason whatsoever. You cable provider will provide HD signals. The only caution I would suggest it to make sure that when you remove the mast, that you don't disturb something that will cause the roof to leak. Things will be generally badly rusted, so a hack saw and bolt cutters are your friends. Don't forget to pull down the feed line, as well.
/paul W3FIS
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
on 7/18/2008 8:51 PM Aaron Fude said the following:

http://www.popsci.com/files/imagecache/article_image_large/files/articles/antenna_roof.jpg
No, you can remove it. That way, you can put a few more satellite antennas up there.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Put it on Craigslist..some will pay you $$ for it, if for no other reason than its Aluminum
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Aaron Fude wrote:

http://www.popsci.com/files/imagecache/article_image_large/files/articles/antenna_roof.jpg
I'd use it for the free OTA DTV broadcasts.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have The DishNetwork (satellite) I use the antenna for "local HD" channels and dont have to pay "Dish" for the "locals"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rudy wrote:

I'm keeping mine, will probably even upgrade it, even though I have dish. Every time wind blows hard around here, I keep getting the damn 'searching for signal' box on the screen. I need a backup. Plus, like you said, for the locals. I get the dish local package as part of the bundle I'm on, but it isn't ALL the locals. Sometimes one station preempts something I want to watch, but the same network the other direction doesn't. (Yes, I went out and bought a couple of the cheap converter boxes with the coupons, but they can't nail all the area OTA stations- that is why I need to upgrade the roof antenna.)
-- aem sends...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I would keep it for a couple of reasons. If your cable goes out, it would act as a backup to get the major local channels. Plus, your cable provider compresses the HD signal quite a bit to cram all the channels on one cable. Whereas over the air signals you get from your rooftop antenna receives clear uncompressed signal from the transmitter directly by the TV station. And like the other poster said, depending where you live, your cable provider might not provide all the local channels. Plus, you might pick up a station far away to get some freebies, for example an out of market NFL game or an MLB baseball game.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mikepier wrote:

Uh, HD is highly compressed over the air as well. Fits into the same bandwidth as an analog broadcast signal, and there are often several subchannels carrying different programming. The local channels don't usually get compressed at all.

Not bloody likely with HD. Picking up the nearby stations is enough of a challenge. It's not like analog broadast where the signal degrades by getting fuzzy--with HD the degradation goes from perfect picture to nothing with no gradations in between.

--
--
--John
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
antenna looks like VHF most digital channels are UHF, so existing antenna may not be useful.
if your dish goes iout when the wind blows you likely have a tree obstruction......
dish can be relocated to elminate that problem.
I moved my dish from the front corner of my home o the back deck to clear a tree across the street.
right after that my neighbor cut it down because ti dropped leaves in the fall. very sad beautiful mature tree......
but my dish on deck is actually better location.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You'd be surprised. . It depends where you are and how strong the signal is. Some people get a lot of stations OTA with just rabbit ears. The OP would have to hook it up to his TV and do a scan.
And the fact that OTA are compressed might be true, but its less than what the cable companies do.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 19 Jul 2008 06:34:36 -0700 (PDT), Mikepier

Absolutely. I've spent many of the past years just using a single wire 3 feet long or more to get OTA stations. Now that my input is a coaxial connector, I use a thin wire that will fit into the center hole and be gripped by the things in there.
A two foot wire is usually too short to get channel 2. Anything above 5 and the wire doesn't even have to be 2 feet long. My wires are usually on the floor or dangling down from the tv, but on the roof would be better.
So I wouldn't be at all surprised if the antenna in the picture worked well with VHF frequenies. I'm sure some of the elements on the antennas are specifically for UHF.

Compression was objected to on the assumption that the person was trying to receive HD. He may be happy with SD for out-of-town games that he can't get another way.
(I now use a PHillipds DVDR to get digital programs and it receives either but turns the HD into SD, so I have no idea if they are broadcast in HD or SD.)
And I mentioned that when a local game I didn't want to watch was on, I could watch DC stations. As to the reverse, currently, some DC cable providers have Baltimore stations, but I doubt all do or that it is guaranteed to last.
Also, I can watch DC teams on DC stations when they're not on Baltimore stations. All over the air.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mikepier wrote:

People who have investigated find that the local channels are generally not compressed beyond what went over the air, it's cable-only channels such as sci-fi that have the heavy compression. I'd be real surprised if the cable companies had equipment in their local offices that could add additional compression in real time to an MPEG compressed datastream.
--
--
--John
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.