Is there any code for light switch location

I have received delivery of a large modular home. One problem (at least to me) is that some wall switches controling room lights are located quite far from the rooms doorway. Surely code requires a switch when one enters the room. Does the code state how close to the door it must be?
Many thanks!
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The NEC does not

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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote in

Switches are not allowed to be installed on the floors or ceilings.
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On Tue, 15 Jan 2008 16:29:16 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

That's a good question for the builder.
Oren --
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On Jan 15, 4:29 pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

So much for 'quality assured because it is built in the factory' malarky. T
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We have built several modular homes. Quality from one company is poor - from the others, very good. Quality can be better, much better, from a factory. Management also has more control over the laborers. Of course if management desires or is satisfied with bad quality, then that's what that company will produce.
Some companies are geared toward more low cost houses, duplexes and quads. Others are geared toward high end very custom homes and there is everything in between. Like anything else, know who you are dealing with.
On Tue, 15 Jan 2008 14:54:20 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@bellsouth.net"

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Doesn't seem there is much thought put into switch locations in many cases. My in-laws just bought a new $400K condo and in two places the switches are located behind the doors. In a bathroom you have to go clear in the room and close the door to get to the switches in total darkness. The only options in this case would have been to put the switches outside the room, or swing the door to the outside. To the right of the door, the logical place for them, there is only about 3 inches of wall before the tub opening.. In the other instance the switches in their den/office are behind the French door. In this case they could have been located a foot or two further down the wall so you could get to them without closing the door.
The other funny thing in their bathrooms they have timers on the exhaust fans. Not the turn-the-knob and it runs for 10 minute times - times like you'd put in to have them come on at 7am and go off at 10pm. Who wants their exhaust fans 'programmed' to go on and off at selected times? I'm a fairly 'regular' guy - if you get my drift - but not to the point I need to program the exhaust fan to my movements!

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the switches can be relocated, install new box, with switch, run romex to existing box and use blank wall plate.
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The switches are in the right place, it's the door hinges that are on the wrong side.
It could be a lot of various reasons for the case yo give.
If the electrical layout was made first then the finish trim layout could have made the door swing wrong. Depends on if the plans were done by committee and not checked in the final versions or if each didn't have the final layout of the other.
The switches need a wall cavity to go into unless you surface mount them. On the drawing it might look like there might have been plenty room on a wall space, but wall, tub and door framing and trim may have caused a cavity not to exist. The electrical may have been modified from the drawing to be what actually could be put in place.
Also changes can be made after the plans are final and done without all the consequences thought out, door details as to swing and style might have been changed later.
In this case they couuld consider leaving the wall switch on and using a motion detector switch some where in the room to switch on a light; those detectors can be ceiling or wall mounted fixtures or in a table or floor lamp or in a bulb adapter.
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