Is there a reasonable soundwall for a loud generator

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I just got back from a vacation, and my neighbor mentioned that my son's generator is too loud. I'm wondering if there is a way we can make it not so loud. build a wall, buy maybe some igloo thing, with a exhaust fan, or something like that...Any help is appreciated
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PeterM wrote:

If you put it inside a shed or trailer that should do the trick. Of course you don't want to spend any time inside the box with the thing upon penalty of death. When i was on the crew we used to put our noisy air compressor inside the work trailer. You could barely hear it. We never bothered to ventilate and it worked fine. Carbon monoxide is colorless, odorless, and quite deadly. You have been warned.
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wrote:

Do a google newsgroup search of alt.energy.homepower and you will find a recent extensive discussion on quieting generator noise.
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Ventilation, ventilation, ventilation! And then put a decent muffler on the thing.
I saw a guy in a state park a couple years ago who had built a styrafoam box to enclose his generator. He had fans on two sides, one blowing in and the other blowing out. On those sides that had the fan he had a double wall, spaced about 6 inches apart, where the fan blew air down between the two walls to exit on the side. Kind of like this
______________ | >air flow> |^ __________ | ^ | | Generator | |__________ ^ | > Air Flow> ^ | _____________ |
The idea was to keep the sound contained inside the box and not allow it to exit through the ventilation.
The whole idea seemed kind of silly to me. I would have just invested in a replacement exhaust system with a good muffler.
Nate
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Sooo, was it quiet?
Phil

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Not any more quiet than my factory installed Onan. But certianly quieter than it was before the box was built. When he lifted the lid it was noticably louder.
Nate
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Nate wrote:

I put a small car muffler on a 4kw Coleman and it helped, but if you need to really quiet it down completely, you need the "box." On the Coleman, anyway, there is a lot of other noise besides the popping coming from the exhaust. Some of it comes from the engine cooling fan.
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The noise on a noisy generator tends to come as much from the engine block and related areas as from the exhaust. The world's biggest muffler won't help that.
Brian Elfert
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help that.<<
I know this for a fact because I tried to quiet down a 5000 watt generator I used during a outage at home. I have no idea what Honda did to make their engines quiet but they don't make the noise my Tecumseh does. And they start first pull.........unlike mine.
--
JerryD(upstateNY)



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Nate wrote:

Basically, that is what he did, put the generator inside a muffler. It's pretty much the same principal that a muffler works with, using baffles to absorb the sound vibrations.
--
Jon
JPinOH
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snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net says...

The city has had a gas-driven sump pump going outside our house for a few months here after a storm drain collapsed. They built a wall around it out of bales of straw, excellent sound deadening.
--
snipped-for-privacy@phred.org is Joshua Putnam
<http://www.phred.org/~josh/
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Go to groups.google.com and enter the phrase "rec.outdoors.rv-travel generator quiet" and you'll find a couple hundred messages about your subject. Some know what they are talking about. Check for "neon john". Another fellow, I've forgotten his name, is a sound engineer familiar with motorhomes. I'll copy another that was informative.
Steve www.wolfswords.com under the motorhome link
The major flaw in your plan is that moving the genset away from your rig puts it close to your neighbors, who probably won't appreciate it.
In my professional life before I dropped out of the rat race (the rats were winning) I did a lot of work with VIP airplane conversions of airliners. We made the first-class area of a 747 so quiet that the customer bitched about the noise from the cooling fans in the entertainment cabinet.
The main "trick" is to put absorption curtains around the source, and to isolate the curtains from the vehicle structure. The most successful scheme was to make an enclosure with acoustic tile mounted on honeycomb wall board and then hang the enclosure on bungee cords from the ceiling of the compartment in which the noise was being generated. The basic principle is that the sound energy goes into holes the acoustic tiles and rattles around in there while the softly suspended enclosure isolates the sound from the vehicle.
For an RV, where cost is more critical than weight, you could do the same using gypsum wallboard as the enclosure walls, with acoustic tile applied to the inside surfaces. I have used this technique in a townhouse where a new furnace was far too noisy for its location at the top of the stairs. I figure we reduced the noise by about 70 percent.
By all means, use the best exhaust muffler you can afford, but for mechanical vibration, an acoustic enclosure with noise-cancelling mounts can work very well.
The ultimate solution would be an active, noise-cancelling audio system, but that can get into mucho dollars. The concept has worked very well on some turbo-prop airplanes. It produces opposite phase, electronically generated noise which cancels out the source. The drawback is that the electronics have to have about the same power as the sound levels that penetrate the sensitive areas. Again, adequate insulation is the key to making one of these systems work, otherwise you need electrical power of similar magnitude to the source of the noise.
There are many sources of information available on the Internet for anyone wishing to pursue more details.
Frank Damp Anacortes, WA
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PeterM wrote:

Hook up to the grid????
Try http://www.soundproofing.org /
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia duit
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mass and travel paths of sound are key to blocking sound. Best would be a concrete bunker. Not ideal for sure. You may be able to build a shed like structure out of concrete or concrete block (Solid is better) put on a roof and a little ventalation and your all set. Even w/o the roof it will cut down a lot. Could make it blend with the house.
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Yes it is. I've written extensively about this in recent years. You might want to try the google archives.
If you want a quick tip, look for marine acoustical treatments. They're much more advanced than RVs.
You might also want to look at the photos here:
http://www.johngsbbq.com/Neon_John_site/Generator/Quiet_pack_55G/Quiet_home.htm
to study how Generac did it with their QuietPack line of generators, the quietest ones I've ever laid ears on! Major features:
* heavy metal case. Probably at least 12 gauge. * Heavy coating of sound damping paint, probably powder-coated. * Fiberglass sound absorbent on internal surfaces. * sound damping metal shields around the engine. All panels are coated with the same heavy sound damping finish. * A huge muffler (all of the space to the left of the open bay) in a fiberglass damped compartment. * baffled air intake.
John
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--
John De Armond
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Based on what John experienced I changed out my broken Onan (SEE BELOW) with a QuietPak 55G and am AMAZED at the difference ... as is the neighbor. The generator compartment is next to his side door. During blackouts he mooches electricity but otherwise he'd of complained about the Onan. The Generac isn't hardly noticeable.
NOW! If they'd tighten the darn screws. The warranty shop that had to tighten my screws said they are notorious for leaving the shop busted.
No matter, there is no competition. I wouldn't go with any other.
Steve www.wolfswords.com under the motorhome tab, then under the generator tab
FOR SALE: One Onan 6k that works great, starts quick, and is otherwise in perfect shape except for the voltage being at about 80 volts. It is probably a shorted winding. I understand many models of Onan have the same winding. Asking ... I don't know ... CHEAP! PICKUP ONLY near the real Cleveland. Not far from the Rock-and-Roll Hall of Fame, Cedar Point Amusement Park (much better than those other parks), etc.

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Neon John wrote:

What is the sound level rating on those? Onan has 66db as about the quietest that they carry.
--
Jon
JPinOH
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wrote:

I don't know. Sound ratings are kinda BS anyway because so much depends on how you measure it.
I do know that the Generac is quieter than an EU3000 at full load. At a crafts show I parked my concession stand beside a guy selling hot-transfer tee-shirts. He powered his trailer (lights and heated presses) from an EU3000. Our generators sat nearly side by side. When his presses were heating, the EU's noise drown out mine almost completely. Mostly exhaust noise I think. At partial load with the eco-throttle turned off (it would trip when the heaters turned on when on eco-throttle), they were about equal.
I didn't have a dB meter with me, just the good old Mk 1 ears. But several of us vendors stood around marveling at how quiet the Generac was. The tee-shirt guy was kinda envious since my quieter generator made almost 6kw, about twice what the EU can do. I was running more resistive loads than him plus I had a 15kbtu air conditioner. While he was sweating over those hot presses, I was luxuriating in cool comfort :-)
John
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John De Armond
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So you are saying that a 27HP engine running slow so that it is putting out, say.....14 HP, is quieter than a 14 HP engine running full throttle.
--
JerryD(upstateNY)

>Neon John wrote:
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Neon John wrote:

What is the sound level rating on those? Onan has 66db as about the quietest that they carry.
--
Jon
JPinOH
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