Is there a programmable thermostat that can...

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...anticipate the time it takes to reach a certain temperature by a certain time?
For example, during the day while no one is home but the cats, we keep the temperature set at 80F. I arrive home at 5:00 p.m. and would like to have the temperature at 75F. when I arrive.
Rather than my having to "guess" how long it might take to reduce the temperature by 5 degrees, is there a thermostat capable of figuring that out?
TIA
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Wayne Boatwright
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:

Several...dags
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On Wed 22 Jul 2009 05:46:04p, dpb told us...

Okay, thanks...
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I don't know the answer to your question (that's hapening a lot today), but how much difference could it make if it sometimes gets to 75 half an hour early? I'd just set it a little early and relax.
I'm sure you could have one built (interface inside and outside thermometers and the AC to a small computer). It still could be wildly inaccurate sometimes, because the weather conditions could change drastically between the time it decides to start and the time you expect it to be at your set temperature.
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On Wed, 22 Jul 2009 17:54:12 -0700 (PDT), Larry The Snake Guy

    I had one that used the rate the temperature changed when it called for heat or cold to determine needed start time to reach a given temperature. All you did was set it for the temperatures you wanted when it then give it a few days to figure it out and it was good. A sudden big change in outside temperature did fool it a little, but it was very good. As I recall it was a Honeywell, but not a current model.
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I have a Honeywell that does that. It remembers the previous attempts to reach the preprogramed temperature, and adjusts to try to start the next attempt to reach it with the least time / least fuel compromise. The only thing is, here in Texas the weather swings wildly at certain times of year, confusing it somewhat. but overall it is a good system.
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I have one here in michigan... after a few unusually cold nights, and a drafty front door, I found my system had "learned" to turn itself on at 3 am in order to hit the desired temp by 7... I turned the "smart" feature off, and suffer thru the 1 degree difference in temp if its a cold night now. Dave
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On Wed, 22 Jul 2009 19:33:37 -0700 (PDT), Zephyr

I turned the feature off after waking up sweating because the furnace decided it had to turn itself on an hour before it was time to get up just to hit the temperature on a cold morning. I'd rather suffer a little and just have it start fifteen minutes before time to get up.
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On Thu, 23 Jul 2009 00:33:16 GMT, against all advice, something
say:

Yes. They are made by Honeywell
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On Wed 22 Jul 2009 07:13:53p, Steve Daniels told us...

Thank you!
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2009 19:13:53 -0700, Steve Daniels wrote:

The upper end White-Rodgers thermostats can do that, too. Look for units with the feature called "Energy Management Recovery (EMR)"
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:

Most programmable 'stat has that ability. It learns the temp rise/fall pattern after you program it. One example is Honeywell Vision Pro line. Micro-processor within is little smart. Take a look at manual which you can download .
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Tony Hwang wrote:

not even that fancy. I have a trane one that I believe is a relabeled Honeywell, but not Vision Pro. Seems to work well; at least I've never come home to a sweltering house or awakened cold.
nate
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Nate Nagel wrote:

I loved Vision Pro 8000 series. Now I only have one out at my cabin. I moved onto wireless 'stats for other places I own.
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On Wed 22 Jul 2009 07:23:00p, Tony Hwang told us...

Thanks, Tony. I've since looked at the range of Honeywell models, and think model RTH2310 would easily suit my needs. Our schedule and lifestyle doesn't require anything too sophisticated. It's a 5 + 2 program. Our M-F would be consistently the same, as would our Sat-Sun, and this one would do the job.
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Wayne Boatwright wrote:

My choice is Vision Pro 8000(often it's over kill). Nice touch screen, arm chair programming, Very accurate temp. keeping. I used to set it 5+2 day pattern. In summer or winter when we get up in the morning or come home in the afternoon we never felt too cold or hot 'stat did the job for us. Now I moved onto wireless one. I can move it to any area of the house. I live in Southern Alberta where air is very dry particularly in cold winter.
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On Wed 22 Jul 2009 11:38:41p, Tony Hwang told us...

We all have our "toys", eh Tony? It actually would be overkill for me, as I just want to get the job done. My "toys" are more closely related to high end kitchen gear, both large and small.
It occurred to me today, however, that the 5+2 isn't actually ideal for me because I always work at home on Fridays and would require the same settings Friday thru Sunday, then different settings for Monday thru Thursday. There is a similar model to the one I mention which allows 7-day individual programming, so that's probably what I'll buy.
I am curious about the wireless thermostat you now have. I was unaware they existed.
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I had two programmable thermostats removed, and cheepos put in their place. Unless you are homebound and have the exact same schedule week to week, there is always times when the units are running and no one's home, or it's too hot or too cold. Saved a lot of money. We live in hell. Couple of days ago, it was 113. We leave the windows open during the day, as leaving on the AC is just a waste. From the time we get home, it takes only about fifteen minutes to cool down the house. Then at about ten, we open it up again, as the night time temps are very cool. I don't think fifteen minutes is a long time to wait, when given the choice of $$$$$ more each month.
Steve
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wrote:

What I would like is a programmable stat with a NEXT key that would go to the next scheduled tmeperature period.
Becase you're right, sometimes we get up early or come home early and all I want to do is press NEXT and have it now strive for the temp it would in the next time period. Instead, what all that I've seen tell you do to is to press a bunch of buttons to set the temperature for now to some other temp. NEXT would be so simple.
I didn't think of it myself. I saw it on a stat maybe 20 years ago, but I wasn't ready to buy a second one then, and now I can't find this kind.
Does anyone know who sells something like this?
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On Wed 22 Jul 2009 08:53:39p, SteveB told us...

Obviously our situations are different. But first of all, if your AC can drop your temp from 113 down to 75-80 degrees in 15 minutes, I'd say it's seriously oversized. Our unit is sized correctly to maintain virtually any temperature we set, but it take 45-60 minutes to drop it from 80 to 75 degrees when it's 110 degrees + outside. We live in the desert, southeast of Phoenix, so we frequently see summer temperatures well above 110 degrees. Considering that we're also subject to frequent dust storms and are not at home during the daytime, I would nver consider leaving the windows open. We also have 5 indoor cats and several aquariums which would not likely survive temperatures above 90 degrees. Case in point, two years ago our compressor went out and it was two days before we could get it replaced. We moved ourselves and our cats to a motel, but the aquariums were cooked, both fish and plants. That, plus our cats were obviously suffering in the high indoor heat. We have a 13 seer unit and maintain 80 degrees daytime temperatures when we're not at home, dropping it to 75 degrees from the time we get home until we leave for work the next day, as well as all during the weekend. During the winter we maintain 70-72 degrees throughout the season, day and night. We've been doing all this manually, and our electric bill is proof enough that we're saving money. I'd just like to automate it so we don't have to think about it. Our weekday and weekend schedules are at least 95% consistent.
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