Is there a pool pump fitting adapter to stop this incessant leak?

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On Tue, 30 Apr 2013 11:29:02 -0700 Oren wrote:

To that end, yesterday I bought the following based on that advice:

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He said it's 12 gauge which is fine

Hard to tell from the pic. The wire size combinations they are good for should be on the package

I noticed that too. He needs enough to bond the motors back to the rest of the pool metal, ie keep the existing bond system intact. Rest of the stuff looks fine.
On another issue, he seems to be having problems removing the 90 conduit elbow from the motor. From what he's describing, ie having to rotate the motor to remove it, I'm wondering if instead of being fastened with a locknut, the motor case has threads in it and it's actually screwed into the motor case?
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quoted text -

He's posted a lot of pics. Does that mean you've seen the nut in the pics? I would think using a nut would be the typical connection method, for obvious reasons. But if there is a nut, I don't understand why he says he has to rotate the motor to get the elbow off.
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On Wed, 01 May 2013 08:26:00 -0700 snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

It took me a while to snap the pictures for you (see below).
There is no nut.
The darn elbow drove me crazy for a total of six motors so far (the first three are shown below):

Here's the problem: 1. You can't get the motor endcap off half the time so you can't even disconnect the wires in the first place due to the bolts rusting in place (why they use standard steel bolts on outdoor motors is beyond my comprehension).
Here are four "extra" motor caps, for example, from past motors I tried to extricate from the plumbing:

2. When you finally get the motor endcap off, and disconnect the three 10AWG wires, you can't easily get them through the restrictive 90 degree 1/2 to 1" elbow due to the size of the crimped on spade & lug connectors.
Here's the filter pump with the 90 degree elbow attached:

Luckily, the spa jet pump has a straight-through fitting:

Is there a better way than the straight through connectors that I bought at Home Depot?
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On Wed, 01 May 2013 07:47:43 -0700 snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I don't have the experience to have known to describe the difference, in advance anyway - but what you say is exactly what's happening! Gimme a sec to snap a photo to show what I mean, on the last three motors that were hooked to these very same wires:

The existing 90 degree 1/2" to 1" elbow is fantastically difficult to remove, such that the wires get all twisted and the insulation cracked so badly that I had to put wire goop on them where they go into the conduit (see circled area in this picture):

So, I plan on slicing the 1" conduit a couple inches back, and removing all the cracked wire and then putting the junction box down at that point.
You'll also notice I bought straight-through conduit connectors as I'm done with 90 degree elbows!
Is there a better way?
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That settles it. There are threads in the motor housing. So, you're right, it makes it a PITA to remove.

It sounds like a reaonable approach to me.
But if it were me, I'd probably get out a 1/2"+ drill, ream out those threads and use a locknut to secure the elbow to the motor. Then I'd use a straight run of conduit back to the timer box. But, I have those drills :) In your situation, nothing wrong with what you're doing.
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On Wed, 01 May 2013 09:43:56 -0700 Oren wrote:

I'll say it bluntly that fear of the unknown is my reason. I'm afraid of touching anything in the $$$ control box. Someday I'll have to tackle it though, because I can't find the darn heater fireman switch - but that's for a later day ...
By the way, the motor cleaned up instantly with the muriatic acid. I was shocked how the deposits just frizzled away. (muuuuch quicker than with the toilet bowl deposits!)
Here's the motor being doused with the acid (outside!).

Notice the instantaneous action on the concrete:

Dousing with the hose washed almost all the deposits off:

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On Wed, 01 May 2013 09:38:26 -0700 Oren wrote:

I'm actually afraid of touching the control panel.
In fact, I do need to disassemble it to find the darn fireman switch to the heater (which is throwing an "open fault code").
But that's for another day ...
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On Wed, 01 May 2013 11:20:04 -0700 Oren wrote:

OK. That's it! :) You publicly shamed me into taking a closer look at the control panel:

This is what I found inside, which, incidentally, is the kind of "junction box" that I was expecting to put on the ground:

I guess I would unscrew the nut and then loosen the three bolts holding down the wires to disconnect?

PS: What is that thing hanging down to the left that looks like a potentiometer?
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On Wed, 1 May 2013 21:06:38 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

What in the world is being "controlled" besides the two pumps and that requires all that wiring????
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On Wed, 01 May 2013 15:05:31 -0700 Ashton Crusher wrote:

I have no idea if that's a lot of wires for a controller or not.
But to answer your question, it seems to control: 1. Three single-speed 220V pumps (filter, cleaner, spa jets) 2. Two 24V Jandy valves (solar:gas heating & spa:pool filtering) 3. One gas-fired heater (for spa & pool heating) 4. Two sets of underwater lights (in the pool & spa)
That's about it (I think).
I would think that's a pretty normal setup - so your question about "all that wiring" is surprising to me (but I don't know any other pool).
Here's the picture of the wiring again (so you don't have to look it up):

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On Wed, 1 May 2013 23:21:10 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

I've got two pumps, one for the spa and the other handles the pool and cleaner together. Just one time clock to turn the pool pump on and off. The spa heater is turned on manually and the valves moved to "spa position" manually. Light is turned on and off manually.
I guess your's is fully automated, hence teh complexity. Not sure I'd want that level of complexity. In fact, I don't even want the pool or spa anymore! I wish they could be easily and cheaply put in storage.
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That's a temperature sensor, part of the solar control system. To measure water temp, you drill a hole in the PVC pipe that accomondates the long part, the sensor goes in and a hose clamp secures it in place. There is a seal that is part of it that prevents it from leaking. Or it could go at the solar panels to measure the temp there. Those are the two relevant temps. What it's doing hanging there, IDK. It may be one more that acts as a freeze sensor, but would seem to me the one on the solar panels could do that too.
If it was installed just hanging there like that, it;s another fine example of incompetent installers.
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On Wed, 01 May 2013 07:33:16 -0700 Oren wrote:

Thanks for doublechecking for me.
I'm not sure if I was supposed to get stranded, but, the existing wire is apparently 10AWG stranded - so that's why I got the same for the extension wire.
Here's a shot of the existing wires I took just now:

You'll notice that I need to cut off about 6 inches because they're all busted up from spinning the motor and tugging them through the tiny restriction of the 1/2 inch to 1 inch elbow.
You'll see that the darn wires, with the connectors crimped on, do not fit in the half-inch elbow easily - but that's the size of the pump opening - so not much can be done about it I guess.

Thanks for doublechecking as I've never done 220 volt wiring before - and this is the largest diameter wire I've ever done.
Here's a closeup of the package I just snapped to clarify:

It "says": 20AWG to 10AWG, Medium Direct Bury Waterproof Connectors
Of course, I could have gotten just regular wire nuts; but I figured these were better (what I really expected was that there was some kind of bolted down connection sort of like there is in a fuse panel).

Ah, thanks for asking as I hadn't mentioned it, but, you actually noticed it's not there.
I appreciate that you're thinking of what's to come!
Since I'm not sure where the pumps will actually end up, I figured I'd get that solid wire last since it's not a "functional" requirement. (Yes, I know, it's a safety requirement - so what I'll do is clamp to the existing bonding wire when testing or more likely - I'll run with the dark horses & just stay a few feet away while testing.)
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On Wed, 01 May 2013 08:46:20 -0700 Oren wrote:

Nope. It's threaded on in such a way as to make the job of removing it downright despicable.
I apologize that I caused confusion by not posting pictures taken earlier which showed the inside of the motor housing better. I just didn't know enough to clarify earlier.
Here's a sequence of closeup pictures I had taken a few days ago when I had removed the 1/2" to 1" 90 degree elbow:
1. With the endcap removed, you might be able to see that there is no nut on the inside of the motor:

2. This closeup might show the inside a bit better:

3. Even worse, in this picture, you can see that it's nearly impossible to get the three crimped-connector very stiff stranded wires out that teeeny tiny hole!

4. The result is that I have to remove the motor to get any room at all to spin the 90 degree elbow off:

I curse the guys who put it together in the first place. The good news is that the straight through connector "should" eliminate the need to spin the motor; and the junction box "should" allow me to remove the motor even when the endcaps bolts rust through.
BTW, what do you suggest I put on the endcap steel bolts so that they DON'T RUST solid?
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On 5/1/2013 10:58 AM, Danny D. wrote:

i use anti-seize on things i want to unscrew at a later date. i've used this on steel and brass screws and setscrews on my grinders and tile saw, which are underwater all the time. it comes in a small tube or bottle. you can get it at automotive stores easily.
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On Wed, 01 May 2013 11:17:18 -0700 chaniarts wrote:

Hmmm... Lately I've been oiling them, to prevent rust, but I hadn't thought of the anti-seize paste (which I have a lot of from my automotive efforts).
I never thought of anti-seize as "anti rust". But it sounds like it should work!
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On 5/1/2013 11:27 AM, Danny D. wrote:

i don't care if the outside rusts. i care if the threads or head rust to the other metal parts.
oil tends to dry out over time. antiseize is designed to not do so.
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On Wed, 01 May 2013 11:35:25 -0700 chaniarts wrote:

I will use anti-seize when I put the motor back in! Thanks for the tidbit.
NOTE: The main reason those three motors couldn't be repaired by me was that the long bolts (which are about 15 or so inches long) always break - because they too are rusted in place.
Why on earth they use soft steel bolts that are a couple of millimeters thick and more than a foot long for an outside motor is beyond me.
If they made stainless steel replacements, that's what I'd put in them!
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On Wed, 01 May 2013 13:12:19 -0700 Oren wrote:

You can paint threads?
Here is a picture of the last 3 pool pump motors I "tried" to repair. Notice every single bolt broke!

If they made stainless steel bolts to that size, it would be worth it - because when they break, you have to hammer the motor open.
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