Is there a pool pump fitting adapter to stop this incessant leak?

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There is no doubt my filter & cleaner pool pumps are both leaking copiously at the inlet as shown below (mostly when the pumps are off):

Up until now, I've been trying the "miracle in a tube" solution - but it's really not working to plug and glue and stop up the leaks.

The problem is that the plumbing is pressed fitting to fitting, with 7 Jandy valves all pressed together, within a foot with nary a pipe in between:

Is there a magic fitting that I can slip into the inlet that will fix this incessant leak without having to replace the pumps & Jandy valves?
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On Tue, 23 Apr 2013 12:48:23 -0700 Oren wrote:

I'm sorry for forgetting to mention the pump brand. They're both Sta-Rite Max-e-Glas II pumps.
I had replaced this fitting on the OUTLET side:

So, maybe, just maybe, there's a similar threaded fitting on the leaking inlet side?
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That's probably what's there, ie it's threaded. Assuming the basket strainer itself is not cracked at the threads, then you could cut the pipe and put on a new slip to male threaded adaptor. But the other problem you have is that as you pointed out, they packed fitting to fitting to valves etc, without even an inch of pipe to work with. To get it apart and back together, you may have to sacrifice some valves or other components. Not clear from the pic exactly how to approach it. But when putting it back together, as long as you have room to the right of the pump, I'd move the pump over by 6 to 8" so that you have some pipe there to make future repairs easy. That is what should have been done in the first place. With some pipe you can just cut the pipe, get it apart, use a repair coupling to put it back together, etc.
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On Tue, 23 Apr 2013 15:01:18 -0700 snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

If I end up cutting the fittings, I _will_ move the pumps back a foot or two as shown in this photo (yellow arrows):

The problem is saving the Jandy valves & pump by cutting at the right two spots for each pump.
Here's a large picture showing how closely packed the fittings are to the filter pump:

It sure does NOT look threaded - but it must be. Right?
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On Tue, 23 Apr 2013 20:20:22 -0700 Oren wrote:

In California, it is illegal to replace my 1.65 HP single-speed pump with a single-speed pump by anyone but the homeowner. http://westhawaiipoolsupply.com/LessMore.pdf
So, if I hired anyone to replace anything, I'm told it will costs thousands of dollars because the entire system has to be redesigned & rebuilt to accommodate multi-speed pumps. And I wouldn't have the knowhow (or money) to design my own multi-speed system.
I think I'll try to find a way to move the two pumps back about a foot (& maybe to the side as was suggested).
That means cutting at the inlet, as close as I can to preserve both the pump and the nearest Jandy valve.
Here's a smaller picture with the two inlets circled:
(bigger picture below)
It looks like the filter pump (left side in the picture) has a straight "thing" that can be cut - but this thing appears to be a "sleeve" or "repair" of some sort (as it has a slice in the top that you can see in the photo).
If I cut that "thing" in half, I might be able to move the filter bump backward a foot or two.
The problem on the cleaner pump (right side of the picture) is that there are two 90 degree elbows flush out of the pump and butting up against the Jandy valve. So, the question there is _where_ would you cut the cleaner pump inlet lines?
Here is a better (bigger) closeup of the problem:

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It's hard to tell exactly how far back you'd have to go and what all you'd have to replace when you cut this apart. The problem as everyone agrees is that it's all put together with no straight pipe in between that you could cut and rejoin. Some things to keep in mind:
If the strainer basket is cracked, you can very likely replace just that, without replacing the pump.
manual 3 port valves aren't terribly expensive, so if you have to replace one it's not the end of the world. The ones I have are glued fittings, so I think you're going to wind up having to do that.
It looks like you have a motorized valve. Don't know what kind that is, but with the one I have, it uses a standard 3 port valve and the motor part just replaces the top part. So, if yours is like that and you have to replace the motorized valve, it may be no worse or expensive than replacing a 3 port valve.
If you cut it all apart and move the pumps back, I would put unions on both of them. They did put a union on the discharge side of one pump, but it's not clear to me that having just that one does any good, because you still can't remove the pump. With unions on the suction side, if you need to work on a pump or replace it, you just unscrew the union.
If you can do this yourself, even if you have to buy a couple valves, etc, it's going to be a LOT cheaper than calling a pool company.
Depending on your cost of electricity, replacing those pumps with dual speed ones could have a reasonable cost recovery period. The idea is that they run at low speed to filter the water, which is most of the time. Instead of running the pump for say 6 hours, you run it maybe 18 hours to move the same amount of water. But it uses a lot less electricity because the energy required goes up at like the cube of the speed. But I would only use a std dual speed pump. They only cost a little more than a regular pump. There are also variable speed pumps, which have electronics and are very expensive. Those, IMO, are nuts.
Finally, how bad is it actually leaking? For example, If it leaks two gallons a day, unless it's causing other problems, is it worth fixing?
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On Wed, 24 Apr 2013 04:58:20 -0700 snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

How do these two spots look for places to cut?
1. Straight section of the "sleeve" in the filter pump inlet:
Note: This straight section has a weird "gash" in the top of it; so it may not actually be a "pipe" but more of a sleeve over a pipe. I'm not actually sure.
2. Elbowed section in the cleaner pump inlet:
Once I make these two cuts, I might be able to slip a pip OVER the Jandy valve inlet, thereby saving the Jandy valves.
If I have to remove the Jandy valves, I'll have to drain the pool because the filter pumps are 8 feet below the waterline. Sigh... Jandy valve neck
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On Wed, 24 Apr 2013 13:33:06 +0000 Danny D. wrote:

Ooops. I posted the original pic by mistake.
Here is a shrunken pic where the marks are annotated where I think it is being suggested to cut flush with the Jandy valve:
1. Straight section of the "sleeve" in the filter pump inlet:

2. Elbowed section in the cleaner pump inlet:

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You for sure don't want to cut that right next to the valve. If you do, you have nothing to attach to. As I said before, I'd cut it 1 1/2" back from the valve. That leaves you with a nice stub to glue a coupling on. Or you could cut it further back, closer to the strainer, where the white arrow is.

Doesn't matter much where you cut that part, it's all scrap. See my other post about the tool to drill out the valve fitting.
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On Wed, 24 Apr 2013 07:12:50 -0700 snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Don't I have two options for restoring the valve fitting opening?
a) I can drill out the inside pipe to restore the original ID of the valve fitting ...
b) Or I can simply place an oversized pipe on the outside of the valve fitting, and then step that oversized pipe down to the standard 2-inch pipe by the time it gets to the pool pump?
Right?
If so, the second option *seems* easier (if it works).
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As i said earlier, you MAY have that option. IF the valve is designed for that. I have seen pool components that are designed to accomodate two different size pipes. But they are not ALL that way. If that were a regular PVC valve, there is no way you'd connect to the outside, because it's not designed for it. The outside of a regular PVC valve isn't a standard size that you can put another PVC fitting, pipe, etc over.
If you can do it that way, then yes, for sure it's easier.
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I don't know exactly what that section is composed of either. But why not just cut it about 1 1/2" from the valve? That looks like just normal pipe. Then you have 1 1/2" of pipe sticking out to put a coupling on when you rebuild.

But that section is all just elbows, no pipe. So, it doesn't matter where you cut it. And the pipe is glued into the valve. Normally, I'd say you'd have to replace the valve. But...... A few months back on This Old House, Richard Trethway was working on a sink and he used a tool I'd never seen before. It goes on the end of a drill and it's made to go inside a previously glued PVC fitting and ream out the old glued in pipe part so that the fitting can be saved and used again. It's made for situations like you have.

Ain't nothing going over that because those valves are goes inta, ie they are a slip/glue fitting.

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On Wed, 24 Apr 2013 07:07:37 -0700 snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

It looks like normal pipe - but notice this huge but ancient gash cut deeply circumferentially in the middle of it.

If that sleeve were only a single-wall pipe, that gash is so deep that I suspect the pipe would have burst long ago, don't you think?
If it weren't for that deep gash, I'd agree that it would appear to just be a regular pipe.
But that gash tells me there *may* be a pipe inside of a pipe.
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Just cut the pipe off 1 1/2" from the valve, before the gash. Do you want to make everything harder and more complicated than it has to be? There isn't a pipe inside a pipe. And there isn't anything to make it burst. You're looking at the suction side
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Yes, I saw your earlier post. But why would you want to use a fitting that reduces the size of the pipe, when you can just leave a 1 1/2" stub coming out of the valve and then use a 50c regular PVC coupling?
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On Wed, 24 Apr 2013 08:48:59 -0700 Oren wrote:

I think I'll take advantage of that reducer fitting!
In fact, I think that seemingly straight run into the filter pump might actually be two reducers fitted end-to-end ???
I surmise that because of this huge circumferential "gash" at the center point of that straight run outlined by the arrows:

Here's a closeup of that "gash":

Do you think this straight run is actually two of those reducer fittings, pressed together, end to end?
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Oren, I think we should get a saw, get his address and go over there. I mean I'm all for thinking things out and planning ahead. But this isn't a mission to fix the Hubble telescope where you have to have every possible contingency covered. Cut the freaking pipe.
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wrote:

e.

+1
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pe.

+1
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wrote:

e.

The really unfortunate thing.... I live within walking distance of DDD. But IMO, he's beyond help.
I think my real issue with DDD is ... his approach to home repair painfully reminds me of my dumb, know-it- all, cheap ass brother (also a CPA, who woulda thunk?)
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