Is there a 'magic' solution for dissolving labels on glassware?

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On Thu, 09 May 2013 19:35:51 -0500, The Daring Dufas wrote:

Actually, my mistake for changing jars in the middle of the thread!

I started with glass, but they were so easy to remove the labels I then moved on to the muuuuch-harder-to-remove plastics vitamin jars with paper glued on labels.
The plastic vitamin jars have been soaking in the recommended solutions for the past five or six hours or so: 1. Oil (doesn't look good so far) 2. Soap (looks pretty good) 3. Alcohol (seems the same as the control) 4. Water (the control)
Also I have a peanut-butter jar soaking in water, but, it appears to have a plastic label, and not paper like the vitamin jars - so - it's an anomaly.
I'll report back tomorrow ...
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"zxcvbob" <> Peanut butter jars? Why didn't you say so! (those are my favorite jars

butter jars are also fun for a toddler just learning how to open things. A ping-pong ball ( or a frog) inside a peanut butter jar makes learning to twist a lid big fun.
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On 05/09/2013 08:23 PM, Polly Esther wrote:

As an aside, octopi have learned to open screw-top jars.
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Yes, but the ping pong balls float to the top of the ocean, and they become sad.....
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Most of the time, soap and water is plenty.
When that doesn't work, I go to Goo-Gone.
When that fails, carb cleaner has always worked.
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On Fri, 10 May 2013 05:39:10 -0700, TimR wrote:

When they dry out, that's what I'll try ...

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Vegetable Oil After you have soaked off the paper part, use vegetable oil and work it into the glue with a brush or scrub pad that won't scratch the glass
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On 5/9/2013 12:32 PM, Danny D wrote:

Try lighter fluid, then wash with soapy water. Another 'fix' would be to add and dissolve "dishwasher" soap (the dry, crystal sort) to a bowl of water and soak the glass container with the label in that solution for a few hours, then the label peels off easily and quickly. However, the lighter fluid may be needed to remove the gluey residue.
Sky
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Danny D wrote:

You want GooGone. Supermarkets, home centers, maybe even chain drugstores.
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wrote:

Paper labels on glass generally disappear in a dishwasher, if not a safety razor always works.
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On 5/9/2013 12:32 PM, Danny D wrote:

Use a hair dryer to blow hot air onto the label. This will loosen the glue so you can peel it off. If there is any glue residue, use Goo Gone.
Long time ago my first husband worked for a discount shoe store chain that put labels on the sole of the shoes. They had those 'x' cuts and were almost impossible to remove. Someone told him about the hair dryer method and I've used it successfully ever since.
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Janet Wilder
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On 5/9/2013 5:57 PM, Janet Wilder wrote:

Like some DIY show I watched where the guy was struggling to get up a linoleum floor. I thought he needed a heat gun but his friend suggested a hair dryer. That actually worked.
Long ago my ex gave his brother some pots, they had a label on each one that wouldn't budge. While he was heating something up on the stove, I picked at the label and it came off effortlessly. It was good for a laugh at the time, but I learned that heat was a good tool to release glue.
nancy
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Danny D wrote:

Goo Gone.
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On Thu, 09 May 2013 15:36:57 -0700, Julie Bove wrote:

So many people recommended this stuff, I had to look it up, via the MSDS: http://googone.com/GooGone-MSDS
It appears to be roughly 95% petroleum distillates, and then from 1 to 10% Tripropylene glycol methyl ether.
Googling for what "petroleum distillates" are, Wikipedia wasn't all that helpful: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petroleum_distillate
Googling some more, it looks like it's the same as mineral spirits: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_spirit
So, I should be able to buy some at the hardware store.
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Danny D wrote:

It's a combination of solvents, plus it's heavily scented. If you don't need a 100% removal rate and you don't care about the nasty smell, then buy mineral spirits and save yourself 45 cents.
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On Fri, 10 May 2013 13:20:38 -0400, George M. Middius wrote:

Thanks for the advice.
I'm a firm believer in figuring out what a chemical is, and then just buying it in bulk.
For example, my female kids love that straight acetone from my garage works just fine when they run out of nail polish remover.
And, on of my male kids uses dish detergent instead of shampoo for his short hair, since he learned that they're practically the same thing (and all my kids have to buy their own personal hygiene products since they fight over them all the time).
I'm going to try the following solvents, simply because they were what are in my garage at the moment:

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On 5/10/2013 9:19 AM, Danny D wrote:

Acetone would probably work on glass and ceramic - not plastic. I'd use MEK because it's more aggressive than acetone and it's what I have on hand. You have to be careful with the stuff cause it can be absorbed through the skin. I only use a little at a time.
I've used dish detergent to wash my hair. It worked great but it would give me tremendous dandruff when I used it 15 years ago. I've used it recently and it worked fine without the dandruff problem. These days, however, I just use a bar of soap.
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On Fri, 10 May 2013 10:48:42 -0700, Oren wrote:

BS removal kit ... even works on a Prius!
:)
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wrote:

Is that what the driver's door is called?
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On 5/9/2013 12:32 PM, Danny D wrote:

I'm surprised nobody mentioned WD-40. ^_^
TDD
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