Is there a better way to remove a poison oak plant than with a chainsaw?

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On Thu, 10 Jan 2013 02:21:57 -0500, Wes Groleau wrote:

Botanically, a pristine plant has cell walls, and these cell walls keep the urushiol-laced sap from being on the outside of the roots, vines, stems, leaves, flowers, and berries of Toxicodendron diversilobum.
However, in nature, a pristine plant would be hard to find, so, I don't doubt one bit that there may be oils on the OUTSIDE of the plant!
For a graphic example, look at this picture of me holding a Pacific Poison Oak plant that I just cut with a chain saw.

Clearly the oils are on the outside of this (brutally damaged) plant!
It turns out it doesn't take all that much to damage a cell wall, so, I don't doubt that urushiol sap would be on the OUTSIDE of a (damaged) plant. Here, for example, is a shot from yesterday where I circled all the obvious areas where the urushiol-laced sap bled from the vine:

Given that a pin head worth of urushiol can infect 500 people, and that a quarter ounce of the stuff can infect every human on earth (REF: http://poisonivy.aesir.com/view/fastfacts.html )
I wonder what the CONCENTRATION of urushiol is in the dripping sap in my photos (because I clearly was exposed yesterday to a thousand times what it takes to infect everyone on earth).
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Did you mark the bins so the disposal guys will be aware of the danger?
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I remember reading that Danny did mark the bins. And the trash pickup guys refused the bins.
Just imagine the pickup guys coming down with wicked poison oak, and not knowing why.
Can we donate that stuff to the military, and they can spray it on the enemy a couple days before ground invasions? Just think if we sprayed Mogadishu before the "Blackhawk Down" invasion that went so badly wrong. All those skinnies home, itching instead of shooting at the Rangers.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

Did you mark the bins so the disposal guys will be aware of the danger?
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On Tue, 08 Jan 2013 14:00:50 -0800, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Actually, I had put a sign in Spanish & English on the green recycling bins, but, then I called the waste management company to warn them, and they told me they won't pick them up because they are a toxic waste biohazard!

So, I ended up wistfully pulling all the mutilated Pacific Poison Oak vines back OUT of the bins (which probably exposed me to more than chainsawing them did!) ... and I carried the bleeding-black vines deeper into the chaparral for safety sake, cursing the day I ever got the bright idea of putting them into the recycling bins in the first place!
Lesson learned, the hard way!
Note: In the picture above, the black ring is a ring of oxidized urushiol, which weeped clear, but then oxidized to a black laquer since Sunday.
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They make cutters that mount on excavators look here
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RX66xyk0InQ

After you get it cleared you'll want to keep it sprayed until it quits regrowing.
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On Tue, 08 Jan 2013 20:01:52 -0800, Pat wrote:

I WISH I had an excavator/cutter like that one!
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On Wed, 9 Jan 2013 06:15:46 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

There are similar cutters that mount on small tractors, that's how roadway shoulders are cleared of heavy brush... they're called "flail mowers". From your pictures it appears one could easily clear your property down to stumps with a small tractor with a cab (for protection) and a brush hog... my set up can clear your property an acre an hour. Once cut treat the stubs with defolient, I'd use a hand sprayer.
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On Wed, 09 Jan 2013 11:29:22 -0500, Brooklyn1 wrote:

Understood. They clear the roads out here all the time with a five foot wide cutter than arcs high and can get behind the guardrails (banging them up in the process).
That WOULD work for the part that I just cleared, but not for the part deep down in the ravine 100 feet below (which is inaccessible to tractors AFAIK).
Probably not in my budget though. :(
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"Danny D." wrote:

You don't need to buy, you can rent. But I were you I'd contract with a local land clearing company... since it appears that you really need to get the job done it pays to have the pros do it... they have the equipment and the know how. Often attempting such jobs oneself the cheap turns out expensive. You might be pleasantly surprised to find out having the pros do it doesn't cost as much as you may think. Get some estimates, that's also a great way to learn some good ways to approach your problem from folks who actually know. I know that it can be very tough on certain people's egos but there are some jobs one shouldn't do themselves, from what I can see I think this is such a job. Were it my property I'd have the company that removes trees for me do that job, they'd arrive with a small crew (maybe four men), in no time all that heavy brush would go into their heavy shredder, it would get trucked to a dump site. Then they'd come in and till and power rake your entire field. In practically no time all your problems would be over and you'd have nice fresh land to do with as you will. I don't remember seeing where you mention how much land is involved (acres?), I'm guestimating from your pictures that job will cost you about $1,000, well worth it. Jobs like yours are almost all labor, there are no materials involved like when putting in a gravel roadway... only material for your job is like $100 diesel. Either of these companys can do your job, I've used both several times each, both are very reliable and honest. If all you want is to remove the brush contact LB, if you want to remove the brush and totally improve the topography contact Maggio: http://www.maggioandsons.com / http://lbtreeservice.com/index.htm
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A excavator can work a steep slope with a second rig on top with a winch. A tow truck can be used.
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Look around. Someone in the area will have one. Hire him.
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IF you don't come up with a better method, at least get a chainsaw extender so that you are further away from the spray.
Goats, by the way (I used to raise them), will eat the leaves and softer stems, not the woody vines. If the leaves are hard to reach, they may not bother, but if they do, the trampling of the vines also helps.
They may chew on the bark of the vines--that part I can't remember. They did like the bark of some trees, but I don't remember whether they liked poison oak bark. (It was thirty years ago)
--
Wes Groleau

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On Tue, 08 Jan 2013 23:35:25 -0500, Wes Groleau wrote:

Hi Wes, Wow. You have a lot of good information!
If they chew on the bark, there's no way they're not exposed to the urushiol in huge amounts!
Here is a full-sized picture of what's just under the bark on a small vine, of the type they might chew on. They must have amazing guts!

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On 01-09-2013 01:22, Danny D. wrote:

Well, remember your posts about changing the chemical structure. Hydrochloric acid and whatever else is in goats' stomachs would probably do that.
And they don't chew much at first. Like cows, they pick and swallow rapidly, then they relax somewhere, cough it back up and chew it thoroughly.
--
Wes Groleau

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