Is there a better way to remove a poison oak plant than with a chainsaw?

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On Sun, 13 Jan 2013 18:14:46 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

It still might work, depending on the pressure at the bib. 100' is about 40PSI, so you should have something left at the top. It is iffy, though. The most important thing is to make sure there is enough volume that the washer doesn't dry up or overheat. I don't think that takes much water.
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You can figure the pressure from elevation at .434 PSI per foot of elevation, or 2.2 feet per PSI.
Sounds like the elevation will make up for the friction loss in the hose.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
On Sun, 13 Jan 2013 05:14:29 -0500, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Luckily this situation would have the pressure washer at the bottom of the ravine a few hundred fee down the hill, which is a good hundred feet or so vertically BELOW the hose bib at the house.
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On Sun, 13 Jan 2013 05:34:28 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

I'd worry more about having the physical strength to drag 400' of garden hose about, on uneven ground 100' of hose filled with water is heavy and difficult to maneuver... and you'll end up stretching the hose causing permanent damage. I once made the mistake of buying eight 100' lengths of 5/8" garden hose because it was on sale at Lowe's, thought it a good way to water some young trees I planted around my property, NOT! Even on level ground I could barely drag two lengths. I ended up filling several 5 gallon contractor buckets and hauling them in a wagon attached to my tractor. There's good reason those hose reels only have a capacity of about 150'. A garden hose filled with water is quite heavy... empty hose is even more difficult to drag about, it twists and kinks. Those silly light weight hoses shown on TV of late are a bad idea, dragging them in more then a 25' length filled with water will ruin them immediately.
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On Sun, 13 Jan 2013 12:15:47 -0500, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

Move it empty if it's too hard when it's full. I always put mine away empty, for many reasons. That's one.

Any decent hose shouln't kink, unless you force it to. Don't twist it!
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On Fri, 11 Jan 2013 18:16:26 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

Mine sucks out of the tank(s) when the "soap" nozzle is inserted in the wand. With the other nozzles the pressure is too high to suck the soap out of the tanks.
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On Fri, 11 Jan 2013 12:32:19 -0800, Oren wrote:

Ah. Thanks (and to others who said this too).
I 'could' hook up a few hoses (I bought a few of the gray Costco 3/4" "industrial" 100-foot hoses a couple of years ago.
They're actually crummy hoses (they kink too much compared to rubber), but they're long. I'd only need four of them but in reality, I was looking for a more portable solution once I'm down there, in the ravine, surrounded by the poison oak.
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On Fri, 11 Jan 2013 13:45:06 -0800, Oren wrote:

I did try that and failed - which is why I asked if I have to turn a valve or something first.
But I didn't "prime" it, which is what it may need.
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On Fri, 11 Jan 2013 18:28:22 -0800, Oren wrote:

Hi Oren,
I'd consult the manual I had it.
I can, of course, google for it (or something similar), and, I can ask Cosco - I think that's where I bought it - for the company name, but, I didn't try all that hard simply because I 'suspected' I need to drag four hundred feet of garden hose - which - isn't really all that useful.
Plus, I won't be spraying a huge swath, 20 feet to 50 feet deep without the leaves berrys being on the vine, as I'd be wasting my time.
In addition, I DO plan on spraying what I cut as I learned from this thread that I MUST spray within five minutes (before the sap reverses), but, for that, since it was just cut, I should have access with the hand sprayer.
So, there is no rush on figuring out HOW the sprayer works.
On a different note ... I put the camera strap in the bleach wash:

I was surprised. I had expected it to come out WHITE (I used a LOT of pool chlorine - which is double strength of normal chlorine).
That strap came out better than new.
In addition, the camera is now fully swabbed down with the 1:1:1 mixture of oxidizer + wetting agent + surfactant ... so let's hope the wife & kids don't come down with the itchies in the next week!
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On Fri, 11 Jan 2013 08:34:56 -0800, Bob F wrote:

If I had a sprayer that went 20 feet, that would go a long way toward killing (at least half) the Pacific Poison Oak I want dead.
I tried getting my Honda pressure washer to spray from a 5 gallon jug, but I haven't figured out the controls to do so.
The best time to spray, I'm told, is when the fruits are out.
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On 1/11/2013 10:57 AM, Danny D. wrote:

i have a weed sprayer container that sucks via an venturi, that attaches to a regular hose that will easily shoot 20' in a stream, or can be adjusted to spray in a fan. it only cost a few dollars at the borg.
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http://www.homedepot.com/catalog/productImages/300/76/76711d76-df80-405e-8836-d025a8429b88_300.jpg
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On Fri, 11 Jan 2013 11:25:40 -0700, chaniarts wrote:

Thanks for the picture of that weed sprayer. It appears to use a garden hose as part of the apparatus?
I mentioned somewhere in this thread that this infestation of poison oak starts something like 400 or 500 feet from the house (I haven't meaured it but it's easily a football field away), and goes for a few hundred feet further in the downhill direction.
It's not impossible to handle 500 feet of garden hose (I probably have just about that much already) ... it's not the easiest approach.
Personally I'm looking for a more portable solution for the mountain folks like me who have hilly acreage.
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On 1/8/2013 1:24 PM, Danny D. wrote:

cut the vines where you can reach and paint the cut surfaces with roundup.
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On Tue, 08 Jan 2013 15:44:01 -0700, chaniarts wrote:

I'm not sure I've adequately explained the MAGNITUDE of my problem. :(
Please look at this picture I just took today of the other side of the poison oak plant I'm trying to kill.

This is the full-size picture, just so you can SEE, up front, what I'm dealing with, face to face, man to land:

The sheer number of toxic vines is tremendous, so, cutting each one individually and painting them with weedkiller would certainly work - but - it would take a very long time!
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alt.home.repair:

God, what a nightmare. I get an allergic reaction to poison ivy just looking at it. Even looking at your pictures gives me itchy blisters.
Those things look malevolent, like they're aware of and looking to catch and kill human beings.
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On Tue, 08 Jan 2013 21:35:18 -0500, Nil wrote:

Funny you should say that, because I treat it like a battleground! :)
I dress up in my protective gear, and I fuel and oil my weapon, and then I survey my enemy, looking for the weak spots in his fortress.
As I attack, he reaches out at any bare skin with chemical warfare (1 cup of urushiol can poison everyone on the entire planet!) and I coil back in fear when it slaps me in the face.
But, while slashing away at the outliers, soon I spy the leadership, a thick set of vines, each the thickness of a baseball bat, and I aim at them as Alexander did Darias, to fight my way past the wounded weeping tendrils guarding the lair, until I can get close enough to strike deep and hard at the core!

In the end, I win, and hold up the bleeding trophy in my triumphant hands!

Note: The amount of urushiol you see dripping in that one picture can poison the entire population of the planet, according to the prior references! wow.
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Is there a market for that product?
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Someone years ago used to sell snake venom. I have suggested to sell Urishol to the military, they can spray it on enemy encampments.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
wrote:

Is there a market for that product?
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On Wed, 09 Jan 2013 11:37:15 -0500, Stormin Mormon wrote:

If there is, let me know 'cuz I have enough urushiol sap to contaminate everyone on earth very many times over!
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I love work. I can sit around and watch it all day.
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On Tue, 08 Jan 2013 08:05:32 -0800, bob haller wrote:

Hi Bob,
Trust me, I tried the weed killer.
Every year I buy this 2.5 gallon concentrated (41%) glyphosate (which is a huge amount considering you dilute it 2 ounces to 5 gallons of water):

Notice those gloves in that picture are the ones I used on Sunday and they're already starting to show the black urushiol lacquer, which only reveals itself a day later (or after washing), presumably as it oxidizes.
The problem is that you need a helicopter to get the weed killer on the leaves. Sure, I can spray the entire front by the curb, but how do I get the spray 10 or 20 feet deep and down the very steep hillside?
A pressure washer, filled with glyphosate, might do the trick though!

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