Is there a better way to remove a poison oak plant than with a chainsaw?

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Sheep also eat poison oak, and you can also clip them and sell their wool. California has many shepherds who use them for exactly this kind of thing.
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Danny,
Are controlled burns allowed in your area? Remember that uroshiol will evaporate so you'll need full face protection and breathing apparatus. Stay upwind, too.
Dave M.
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"David L. Martel" wrote:

Burning is the worst of all possible methods for poison oak eradication.... using a defoliant is about the surest and easiest method. http://voices.yahoo.com/remove-poison-oak-plants-most-effective-techniques-3296890.html
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On Tue, 08 Jan 2013 09:30:23 -0500, David L. Martel wrote:

Hi David,
No burns allowed. Plus, the smoke could kill my neighbors.
This is California in a high fire hazard high smog zone. It's my understanding we can't even use a wood-burning fireplace for half the year, but that's for smog reasons. So burning is out.
But chain sawing wasn't all that great either. The chain saw splattered urushiol all over the place. My hair was covered in wood chips, as was my face. The rest of my body was covered, except at the wrists and ankles and lower back (my shirt kept pulling up and the tangly vines would lightly smack me in the back as I pulled on them).
I didn't want to use a chain saw, but I would have been there forever had I used clippers - and I've been spraying it for years - it's just too large for spraying.
Clippers would (eventually work), but even clippers won't cut the 5-inch thick vines anyway - and simply pulling was crazy (I tried that first) because all the vines are intertwined.
I once rented a cultivator and tried to push my way through, but the vines simply fouled the cultivator blades, and the hardest part was unwrapping them without getting the urushiol all over my hands (an almost impossible task).
And, now I have the problem with getting rid of it. I labeled the bins, so I hope they take them on trash day.
So that's why I ask.
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Look for someone who rents out goats or sheep and have them come by and eat the poison oak. Seriously. They love the stuff.
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I wonder if it is possible to build or rebuild an immunity to poison ivy, like you can to iocaine powder (see Princess Bride).
I mention this because there was a recent article on egg allergies. Children with severe egg allergies were given trace amounts of diluted egg protein daily, slowly building from something like a millionth of an egg up to three eggs a day over a two year period, and they now eat eggs without difficulty. (not sure I remember the details, but that's the gist of the article)
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On 01-09-2013 08:33, TimR wrote:

Fictional stuff aside, I and others have noted becoming less sensitve to poison oak over time and have attributed it to drinking the milk of goats that eat the stuff. I am not aware of any experiments to test that hypothesis, but the immune effect is real, whatever its cause.
--
Wes Groleau

“Brigham Young agrees to confine himself to one woman,
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On Thu, 10 Jan 2013 01:43:07 -0500, Wes Groleau wrote:

I suspect that very well could be the case. Allergies are clearly complex things, and they clearly have competing actions.
For example, we all know that to be exposed to allergens as a child when our immune systems are developing is a way for the body to learn to ignore harmless things such as almost invisible pollen or mold or dust.
Yet, there's the conflicting statement in this UC Davis site: http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7431.html Which says (verbatim): "Once a reaction occurs, repeated exposures further increase sensitivity. Conversely, long periods with no exposure will reduce an individual’s susceptibility."
That sentence makes sense based on how cell mediated immune responses work in the body.
Yet, on the contrary side, as you noted, you can be exposed to the allergen via other methods (in your case, via goat's milk).
For example, this site says some people were sensitized to urushiol via mangoes: http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/sis/search/a?dbs+hsdb:@term+@DOCNO+7485
And this Wikipedia article says the same thing about cashew nuts: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urushiol-induced_contact_dermatitis
Of course, people with AIDS or other immune disorders are said to have vastly less of a response to poison oak. http://waynesword.palomar.edu/ww0802.htm
And, just as our eyes and muscle mass deteriorate as we age, I suspect our immune systems go downhill also as we age, which would potentially affect the effect of urushiol on our bodies.
So, my only point is that the immune system is so complex, and so variant by individual and age, that I don't doubt that goat's milk might help confer greater immunity to the urushiol.
As for me, if the rash on my neck, ears, cheek, wrists and ankle is of any evidence, I'm clearly not immune. Of course, this site says that a single drop the size of a pinhead can infect 500 people: http://poisonivy.aesir.com/view/fastfacts.html
So, I would be shocked if I did not get a rash, after all the globs of sap that I was exposed to this week.
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On 01-10-2013 02:36, Danny D. wrote:

Well, that's the hypothesis. I don't KNOW that it's in the milk. In fact, it probably isn't. But something derived from it may be.
--
Wes Groleau

In any formula, constants (especially those obtained
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On Fri, 11 Jan 2013 02:07:03 -0500, Wes Groleau wrote:

It depends a LOT on what's in the milk, and, what your body does to it. The entire process is complicated, and I don't profess to fully understand it.
But, it starts with urushiol & T cells.
The actual urushiol is a benzene ring with two hydroxides (i.e., a catechol), with a specific alkyl group which is slightly different depending on species (e.g., poison ivy = 15 carbon chain, poison oak = 17 carbon chain). This molecule is harmless, and it, in and of itself, does not provoke the immune response.
The immune response is complicated in so much as the longer carbon chains in poison oak sap appear to have a greater immune response than the shorter ones of ivy ... and ... the more unsaturated the chain (i.e., double bonds), the more our immune systems react to it (at least it says so in Wikipedia).
Once on the skin, the oil penetrates to the lower antigen-presenting immune cells whose job is to capture foreign invaders and transport them to the lymph notes to be presented as evidence to the specific white blood cells which had matured in the thymus in front of your heart, and which play a role in the cell mediated immune response.
Since T cells, which originate in the bone marrow, randomly mutate in the thymus, some of those mutations select for "self" proteins. But that's bad news for the body, so the thymus has a system for weeding out these miscreants.
Unfortunately, what the thymus lets out are T cells who have receptors that key for the quinole that the urushiol oxidizes to. Hence the rash.
Point is, this is a complicated mechanism, which, we have only two basic approaches to combat:
1. Build up an immunity (i.e., don't create Tcells coded for the quinone) or 2. Remove the quinone from the body as soon as you can
I'm working on the second approach ... you've resolved the first.
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Danny,
I hope you are using Ivy Block or something similar. .
Dave M.
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That looks like an incredible lot of work, and a risk of some wicked allergic reaction. I've not yet reacted to poison ivy, but know friends who are super sensetive.
With poison ivy, I'm told not to burn it, as the fire releases the poison into the air, and anyone down wind will have allergic reaction. Not sure about poison oak.
You have courage, and a lot of hard work. And, you have my respect. Wonder if the local municipality has chipper shredders to do this job?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
This weekend, I needed to remove a poison oak plant along my property but the plant was too big and too much on a hill for spraying; so I cut it with an 18" chainsaw and packed it up for proper disposal.
After just two hours, I was covered in the poison oak oil (my clothes came out of the wash all streaked black as if the kids had taken a black marker to them) - but I had to stop as the two recyling bins were jam packed to the brim.
Since I still have a few more poison oak plants to remove, I'm wondering if you outdoor experts have a better way than what I'm doing for removal of a poison oak plant from your property? (The last picture is of me washing up!)
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I didn't measure it, but this one plant is about 20 feet long (or so), by about 20 feet deep down a hill - but I only removed about 5 feet along the curb as I ran out of room in the bins.
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On Tue, 08 Jan 2013 09:51:58 -0500, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Hi Stormin,
I have a few red bubbly spots on me, but it's not too bad yet. Mostly it's on my left wrist and right ankle and the back of my neck. I'm very surprised my eyes don't itch since I kept getting chips caught in my eye, and my camera & chainsaw have to be covered in urushiol too!
I cleaned the camera with rubbing alcohol (but I'm not sure if that actually works) - but the strap needs cleaning somehow.

I looked it up in gory detail. NOBODY is ever immune.
Eventually everyone gets it (unless they die first). It's like being in war. Just because the first bullets didn't get you doesn't mean your cell mediated immune reactions won't at some point kick in and the next one is the one you regret.
Note: Actually, I'm told people with AIDS don't get it, but that's a special case.

Yes. I know. Inside your body, the immune reaction can kill you.

I called the waste company - they just told me they won't take it. Luckily I have a 4-inch chipper, but it's a royal pain getting anything down the chute (I'm sorry I bought that loud monstrosity).
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Brush cutter / mower.. (rotary lawn mower on steroids) http://www.drpower.com/prdSell.aspx?Name=fab-sp-pro1 http://www.sunbeltrentals.com/equipment/equipment.aspx?itemid=0700067&catid=s446
Make sure the unit is powerful enough to handle the material size. A large mower will chop material so disposal is at higher density or chopped material could be left on ground. Cutting path across hill face much faster than a chain saw.
Be prepared to follow up with the proper herbicide at the correct time in the plant's yearly cycle. True eradication is not a "one time" effort.
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Geez if access to this area is limited just cut all the plants at the base with a loping cutter, mark each location by driving a stake in the spot.....
then when it begins to regrow, herbicide it heavily.
i had great success on poision ivy by mixing 50% roundup with 50% poision ivy killer... they wilted by the next morning and just died... either seperately was not effective:(
do not chip or BURN !! Burning smoke will give anyone in area poision whatever in the lungs! can be life threatening!!
why work hard if you can work easy? the dead plants will eventually rot, but will be a itch hazard till they have rotted away...
but the OP will have a much easier job
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On Tuesday, January 8, 2013 11:05:32 AM UTC-5, bob haller wrote: then when it begins to regrow, herbicide it heavily. i had great success on poision ivy by mixing 50% roundup with 50% poision ivy killer... they wilted by the next morning and just died... either seperately was not effective
Roundup has worked fine for me. The plants take about a week to die, but that gives time to get the poison through the system and kill it all. When they die the next day I don't get the root.
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On Tue, 08 Jan 2013 08:46:24 -0800, TimR wrote:

Hi Tim,
Yes. The Roundup weed killer works.
I buy this concentrate for about $100

The problem with Roundup isn't that it doesn't work.
The problem is getting to the plant, which fortresses itself with 10 to 20 feet of vines, such that I can't get the roundup to the leaves.
The fact the poison oak, out here, is always on a steep hill, makes it doubly hard to get the roundup to the leaves.
I'm thinking whether a pressure washer could work to throw the roundup the necessary 20 feet, but I've only hooked my pressure washer to a garden hose and never to a 25-gallon bucket of weed killer.
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On 1/8/2013 3:24 PM, Danny D. wrote:

Have you tried 2,4D? It works on my poison ivy.
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On Tue, 08 Jan 2013 17:35:56 -0500, Frank

Agent Orange, there you go! ;-)
Poison Ivy is better killed with a "wooded plant" herbicide. 2,4D probably qualifies, though there are several sold these days.
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On Tue, 08 Jan 2013 18:00:34 -0500, krw wrote:

I'd say this poison oak plant I just cut today is pretty "woody"! See this picture of the urushiol literally dripping out!

Apparently 8 ounces can infect everyone on earth - and - if you look at this one stem, I'd wager we could get that 8 ounces out of it in an hour!
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