Is the wood behind the siding rotted, and should I insist the association correct this?

The 2 photos in the links below were taken with camera pointing up at bottom of siding. Does with wood BEHIND the siding in these photos look rotted to you? If so, the condo association is responsible for wood replacement on the outside of building. If the wood is rotted, should I insist they correct this issue or is this something "minor enough" that I shouldn't be "pestering" them about it?
http://mysite.verizon.net/vzeofpch/Junk/wood1.jpg
http://mysite.verizon.net/vzeofpch/Junk/wood2.jpg
Reason I am asking is that I've had carpenter ants get into my kitchen (as much as 10 in one day early in March). I've been able to keep the ant situation under control (so far) by spraying into the gap between counter and wall on the inside of kitchen, as well as spraying the outside of the building where the wood meets the cinder block wall. However, since I took a peek underneath the siding and, to me, the wood appears rotted, I am wondering if I should be insisting that the association replace the wood behind the siding?
Thanks,
J.
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This is why you pay Condo Association dues. I was on the Board of a Condo Association many years ago. Someone made their own exterior repairs and we read him the riot act. It didn't matter that he had done excellent work as we had a contractor on contract who had posted a bond to guarantee his work as long as nobody else did the work - owner, tenant, or another contractor.
Dick
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<<This is why you pay Condo Association dues>>
Ok, but does it look like there is a problem in the photos I linked to.
Thanks,
J.
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jaynews wrote:

Since you are concerned and can show the condition, go to the board. I can't tell from the photos what the sheathing material is, but it does not look to be in good condition. TB
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You will need more ammunition before going to your property management and insist that the siding be replaced because you have ants. The pictures only show a tiny portion of the underlayment. You should get an exterminator in to determine exactly where the source of the problem is. If it is related to the siding ask the exterminator to write a report that you can present to your board of trustees. You should also ask your neighbors if they have an ant problem.
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jaynews wrote: Does with wood BEHIND the siding in these photos look rotted to

That looks like rotted water damaged OSB (oriented strand board) which is used to sheath most construction these days. Having seen plenty of damaged OSB during the hurricanes of '04 in FL, Im pretty sure you have rot going on there. Good luck Steve
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It would appear based on the second photo that you have had some type of water wicking in this area. With the swelling of wood in some areas and not other and the flaking. Question, what year was this built? Is that the old OBS with tar on one side to seal the house? It also appears that your house wrap was not put on correct or it too has water damage. I would have someone look at this, it may cause a mold issue, if not already.
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jaynews wrote:

Sure is hard to tell from those photos, but it does not look to me like it is in very bad condition. If that is the bottom of the siding, then water is going to splash or drain down to that point and saturate the sheathing. Since it is exposed it is going to get wet. You would probably be better off having them install some flashing to protect that bottom area from whatever is causing it to get moisture. Even an elastomeric paint would be better than nothing.
Unforetunately, you are dealing with a standard method of construction which does nothing to protect your sheating. It is going to get worse unless the situation is addressed. In addition, you have siding laid directly over the sheathing with no room to breathe. Unless the siding is primed on the back side, this will cause paint to fail prematurely, and accelerate any moisture problems with the siding.
You can insist all that you want, but until a good contractor comes out and looks at your situation, you will only be blowing smoke. A good contractor can assess the situation and come up with solutions that you can present to the HOA. They can't ignore that. You should try to get your neighbors involved and increase your voice with numbers.
--
Robert Allison
Rimshot, Inc.
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