Is the paint on Sawsall Blades toxic?

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Sort of off topic!!!
I cant seem to find any sawsall blades that are not painted. I want to cut a whole ham into several pieces to make them a more usable size, without thawing the whole ham. I think a sawsall should cut it fairly easily while frozen. It's just that paint that I'm not sure about.
Thanks
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On 12/18/2014 2:26 AM, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

why risk it.
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On Thu, 18 Dec 2014 01:26:19 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

Pretty much ay finish used today is not toxic once dried.
My first choice though, would be to ask a butcher or the place where you bought the ham to do it. They have a bandsaw that will do the job easily.
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On 12/18/2014 04:50 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

AFAIK, the only saw-blade that would be approved for cutting meat would be stainless steel.
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I agree with Ed and Frozen, but if you want, maybe you can use a wire wheel on a bench grinder to get rid of the paint. Wire wheels do wonders. Go from the back down to not dull the blade.

Haven't been close to one very recenty but I don't think they look stainless.
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On Thursday, December 18, 2014 6:36:40 AM UTC-5, micky wrote:

Aside from that, am I the only one wondering how you can do any decent cutting of a whole ham with the typical, relatively short sawzall blade? All I see is a hacked up mess.
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On 12/18/2014 06:36 AM, trader_4 wrote:

I did a Google search and found a nice long stainless steel meat cutting blade. It was about $50
To me however, cutting servings up into /smaller/ proportions is something that just plain does not compute.
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When our family was smaller I used to have the butcher slice a turkey in half. That bandsaw they have is quick and easy, even with frozen foods.
But this is a DIY oriented forum, so:
If I only had one to do, I would definitely get the butcher to do it.
But if I were going to do it reasonably regularly, I'd get a meat cutting blade for my hacksaw: http://www.sawbladeexpress.com/ProductListing.aspx?CatId#8c97d6-c33c-4294-972f-0d40b5bb32db
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On 12/18/2014 8:52 AM, TimR wrote:

Good idea. I bought a hacksaw camp type kit to get included blade for bone cutting and it cost a lot more than this. Blade also shorter and not that handy when used for quartering a deer. I would have bought a hacksaw blade like these had I thought about it.
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On 12/18/2014 8:18 AM, philo wrote:

Why not? A whole ham is about 20 pounds. Most in the store have been cut into a few ham steaks from the center and the end pieces left at 5 pounds or so.
Personally, I'd not worry about contamination from a new blade, but that is just me. I'm not able to tell anyone it is 100% safe.
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On 12/18/2014 2:26 AM, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

Toxic or not, the company is not selling the tool to cut meat and unlikely went through the bother of checking whether or not all components were FDA approved and most of their blades were not designed for this purpose.
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Frank wrote:

I have the saw my Granddaddy used to split deer and hogs . Looks like a giant hacksaw and works just swell . I've seriously considered using my 3 wheel benchtop bandsaw to cut up meat , but wouldn't use a saw on venison - I don't want to get the fat and marrow in/on the meat . I did use my recip saw to cut up a frozen deer haunch into pieces I could wrap once though . I used a long coarse demo blade , and it worked well . The dog was right there , enjoyed the "sawdust" .
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Power tools and cold slippery weird shaped chunks of meat scare me a little.
I think those power saws will take off a wrist just as fast as a ham hock.
I'd rather use the hacksaw and go slow.
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On 12/18/2014 9:28 AM, Terry Coombs wrote:

Later years now, I'm deferring to a butcher but every now and then do a small deer.
Friends and I always used a regular hand saw but when I saw butcher zip off a rack with his hand bone saw, I wanted one. Got the one I mentioned but found just as difficult to quarter a deer.
Like you say, you don't want bone and fat in venison and other than quartering, every other cut is boneless.
For op, I did chemical regulatory work and am familiar with FDA regulations for food contact. Most producers of non-food contact items are clueless on the requirements as product in normal use does not contact food. If clean and not flaking off paint and the like it is normally safe for individuals to use items not designed for food contact. Food toxicity issues are almost always with the food itself, not with what it contacted.
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On 12/18/2014 2:26 AM, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

Blades made for pruning are pretty much paint-free in my limited experience. I'd certainly run the blade through a high-temperature wash beforehand. I had the bright idea one time of running a frozen salmon through my little benchtop bandsaw when I lived in Alaska. I never was able to get rid of the smell no matter how many times I cleaned the machinery.
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TimR wrote:

To each his own , but the hacksaw is just about as dangerous as a power saw IN THIS CASE IMO .
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On 12/18/2014 2:26 AM, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

I'd be more worried about whether the pig was fed GMO food than about the paint on a sawzall blade.
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On Thursday, December 18, 2014 2:27:24 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

Burn the paint off with a propane torch.
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On Thu, 18 Dec 2014 04:36:30 -0800 (PST), trader_4

You have not seen a good selection of sawsall blades. THe standard ones are about 4", but they are sold up to about one foot long.
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wrote:

The important thing is not to have any uninsulated electrical cords around. It on touches the meat, the meat may come alive.

It was good for cutting the 2x6's that held up my deck, and for cutting the water heater into pieces. A hacksaw cuts to a limited depth and a limited length.
With the water heater, it cut 90 or 100% as well when all the teeth were gone as when the blade had teeth.
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