Is my electrician dangerous? Please read

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Usually two inspections are needed for new construction. One for the rough while the walls are open, then the final. It may have passed the first as there were no visible problems and this is why the require a second.
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First off, if the drywall people did screw into the wiring, it's because your electrician either didn't use a nail plate where he should have or didn't use a piggyback cable retainer when running more than two pieces of Romex along a stud.
As for switching wires, it's easy enough to tell if the screw shorted the black to ground. Simply disconnect the wires and do a continuity test. Code requires the neutral to be a separate wire from the ground. That way, if there's ever an open in the neutral, the ground can carry the fault and prevent frying somebody. Right now, it doesn't seem like that's what you've got.
I feel sorry for the electrician because he's going to have to run new romex. But this stuff happens all the time and it's precisely why the code requires nail plates over drilled-through studs and piggyback cable retainers that center the cables on the stud to keep them away from drywall screws.
Bottom line--He screwed up. He's going to have to fix it.
On Tue, 10 Jun 2008 01:44:43 GMT, "Doobielicious"

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If, in fact, that is the problem, it is not much different than the fact that the neutral and ground still end up on the same bar in the panel. He effectively just change the color of the wire.
The problems though, is that if lights are on that wire, the switch is no longer breaking the hot, but breaking the neutral. Problem number two is that you just don't know if the black is just hitting the ground. It may be screwed through and into something else, such as a copper line that can become the ground. The screw may have also broken or severely damaged the black wire. I'd want the real problem found and fixed.
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Well, that's the way it used to be. New main panels separate the neutral bus from the grounding bus. The whole point is to keep the neutral and ground lines separate in the event of an open neutral--even from the main panel to the grounding rod or plumbing.

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That isn't exactly new -- it's been that way for decades.
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Point out your concerns to the inspector. He has the final word. Either it's acceptable or it's not. Why all this tap dancing? If it fails, call the GC and tell him it failed, and why, and to send a different electrician to fix it. Maybe it will pass, and you're jousting with windmills.
Steve
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wrote:

[snippo]
If it passes, then the inspector isn't any more competent than the electrician. There are multiple Code violations here: a) at least one place where the cable isn't adequately protected against nail or screw penetration b) damaged cable as a result of a) c) neutral conductor now connected to something grounded as a result of b) d) use of black wire for neutral e) use of white wire for hot f) hot and neutral reversed at EVERY receptacle on the circuit g) EVERY switch on the circuit in the neutral conductor instead of the hot
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Doug Miller wrote:

Most of this thread is stuff I don't understand - which is neutral, ground, etc. Last summer, the upstairs neighbor in our condo was remodeling. He put in new flooring. We had three electrical outages in part of our unit, the third being the final one because resetting the breaker didn't work the last time. At the moment the power went out the first time, hubby and I were sitting in our dining room and heard the hammer hit the floor upstairs right above us at the moment the power went out. The last time it went out, I went upstairs right away to talk to the idiot doing the work. He explained what and where he was working, which helped greatly when the electrician arrived.
Bottom line, the electrician said the conduit between our units was too close to the flooring above - it should have been deeper in the rafter space. He also said that he had no doubt the nails had penetrated the conduit because the guy used a power nailer (which he had denied). The electrician knew precisely what do do, based on where we told him the damage had occurred. Just to prove the line that he believed was damaged was actually the one, he switched two connections at the main panel. That didn't work, so he started pulling the bad wire out - it had burnt through entirely and had numerous nicks in the insulation from nail penetrations. I was amazed that the electrician was able to feed new wire through the conduits as far as he was able to - I had pictured someone tearing all my ceilings open to fix the problem.
So, in the situation with a contractor and a sub, I certainly would put my concerns in writing to the contractor and ask him to correct the problem to code, with a different electrician if need be. Whoever hired the electrician should be the person dealing with him. A chat with the contractor is proof of nothing if the situation goes bad; a nice, busi- ness-like letter is better.
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On Tue, 10 Jun 2008 01:44:43 GMT, "Doobielicious"

<snip>
You can label a wire on both ends using a tag or paint to make it another color. In other words you can put black tape on both ends of a white wire to use it as a hot wire. Any experienced electrician should know what it takes to pass inspection. Personally, I don't give a rat's ass about a government inspection, but I do care about safety.
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Only under certain circumstances. And this isn't one of them.
A *black* wire is *never* permitted to be re-identified as a neutral.
And what about the damage to the cable? What about the fact that all of the receptacles on the circuit have the hot and neutral reversed? What about the fact that all the switches on the circuit now break the neutral side instead of the hot side?

If you care about safety, then you shouldn't be suggesting, as you appear to be, that there's *anything* legitimate about what this dangerously incompetent baboon masquerading as an electrician did.
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Hey Doob, I'm sure after the feedback you've received here your mind is pretty well made up. I have to chime in and agree with the majority about the electrician. I know a little bit about house wiring, not enough to be an expert like some of those posting here. But even I know that putting your switches in the neutral line is a huge no-no.... From what you have described, you need to voice your displeasure with the GC about the situation. Since the electrician is trying to pull a fast one, you need to have someone you have confidence in. Let's face it, of the home utilities, electric can be the trickiest and most potentially dangerous. And I would still let the inspector know what happened, he may want to give closer scrutiny to the rest of the job. Who knows, maybe this particular electrician has a past history of working like this. His job isn't to bust the electrician's balls, but it is to protect you, the homeowner. I had an electrical inspection done after a major remodel, and he just gave the panel a cursory once over. So, speak up to the GC, and please keep us posted with the outcome. Mark P.S. Buy a $5 tester and check ALL of his outlets for peace of mind.
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Either "yes, he is". Or, you're a troll.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
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????

They
and
plugs/lights
bar
take
that
the
it
I
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Google "Stormin Mormon" +troll
8000 hits.
He is obsessed with the beasts.
On Thu, 12 Jun 2008 00:27:54 GMT, "Doobielicious"

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Not to mention his religious sig line.
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On Tue, 10 Jun 2008 01:44:43 GMT, "Doobielicious"

I'm a licensed electrician. I charge $90 per hour, with a minimum charge for one hour regardless how small the job is.
I can answer your question in one hour or less. As soon as I receive your payment of $90, I'll happily answer your question.
Send payment to:
Jansen Electric PO Box 8103 San Antonio, TX 78209
We accept cash, checks and money orders. Or phone in with your credit card number. 1-800-412-8103 (additional charges imposed for using our toll free number).
Robert W. Jansen - Senior Company President
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wrote:

ROTFLMAO!
You're new here, aintcha?
The question's already been answered. More than once. Correctly, too.
At no charge.
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The nerve of some people.
Business must be slow for him to be on usenet instead of out there charging $90/hr.
wrote:

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m

That has to be the tackiest answer on Usenet. I'd never do business with you.
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