is it OK to use 110V lamps plugged into 220V outlets???


I've read conflicting messages on the internet.Some sources say that USA lamps can handle the increased voltage just fine w/o a step down transformer,others say I need to change the ballast or use step-down transformers.Thanks for any clarity on this!
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Apparently you know little about electricity. There is an electric formula known as "P,I,E, . which if used would tell you that such action would cause the buls to burn out quite quickly.
My advice to you is if your going to be working with electricity then learn how it operates as one and only one mistake can kill you DEAD! DEAD! Jack
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Ok, you say ballast, which implies fluorescent lamps. If they have electronic ballasts, you might, emphasis on the word might, have half a chance. However, you have to check the specs on the electronic ballast. As far as incandescent, no .... the lamp will have a very, very short life.
Jack wrote:

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Expat wrote:

What kind of lamp? If you mean 120V incandescent light bulb, then it will have a very short but very showy life. If you mean the light fixture for incandescent lamps without dimmers it should be fine assuming you are using 240V lights, which of course may not have the same socket.
Then you have florescent lamps etc all of which may have various issues.
In short, I would suggest not.
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wrote:

Sorry for the confusion in my original post.These are 120V Incandescent lamps.So If I can find screw in type 220V bulbs I should be OK then?Thanks for the help so far!
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Expat wrote:

Yes. The regular (medium?) base is a tiny bit different but I can screw a regular US bulb into a European socket so it should work.
If you have candelabra sockets (the small ones used for refrigerator and decorative bulbs) you're out of luck, though. No 220V bulbs for those.
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Incandescents with ballasts? That's a new one on me!
What are you trying to do here, anyway? You've already been told, repeatedly, that the bulb will burn too bright and burn out quickly. Get the right bulbs and give the others to someone who can use them if you can't.
If you want to waste money, send it to me. I promise not to give you anything in return. Honest!
R
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On Thu, 15 Mar 2007 05:32:34 -0700, Expat wrote:

Voltage is the enemy of bulbs. Generally speaking, the lower the voltage, the longer the life. So even if the bulb is designed for 250V, if its standard incandescent technology, then its life is probably shorter.
Those tabs they used to sell to put in bulb sockets would increase bulb life because they slowed the inrush current and lowered the voltage by adding a bit of resistance. Decreased performance too, but...
Funny thing is, rotary dimmers will significantly extend the life of bulbs if they are designed such that they have to be turned on from low to high, and can not be pushed instantly on.
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The ones I remember used a diode.

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Thanks for the advice,great forum!
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There is no ballast in an incandescent lamp.
What Gfretwell said but remember that 220 can kill you a heck of a lot faster than 110. Not just twice as fast but I'm guessing maybe 10 or 20 times as likely. So don't stick your finger in the socket, etc. etc.
There are or used to be electricians, or amateurs, I'm told, who would check for power in a 110 volt circuit by sticking their finger in the socket, but no one would ever try this with 220. Don't touch something by accident.
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Yeah,sorry for the confusion in the original post.There is no ballast in these incandescent lamps.Just have to drop 220V bulbs in and install a plug adapter and I should be good to go.The stamping on the lamps says 250V and the zip cord is rated higher.Thanks to "gfretw" for cuttin' through the BS and giving me the answer I was looking for!
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You're right -- just change the light bulbs to ones from the local area, and either get an adapter for the wall socket into which you can plug your U.S. style plug, or stop by a hardware store and get the right plugs and swap out the U.S. plug for the local area. The specifics will depend on your area -- in Thailand the local 220V current used a U.S. 2-prong plug; in other areas we lived, the local plug was either two or three pronged with round prongs or large thick prongs. In one of our overseas locations lights and appliances were sold without plugs, and when you bought them the sales person asked what style of plug you wanted, then got the right one from supplies and put it on at the time of sale.
Some of the other things mentioned here weren't a problem -- using 220v lights we saw no difference in life of the light bulbs. We also wound up with a bunch of transformers which we could use for other electrical items that weren't self-adaptable to 220-240V current -- small appliances, fans, dehumidifier, radios, electronic organ, etc.
Been there, done that. Regards --
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