Is it obvious when a chainsaw bar is worn out?

Not sure how long a bar should last. I've sharpened the chains many times now and it seems great. Just wondering how long bars last and how it will show itself.
Thanks!
Dean
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I know very little about this, but will share what I just read in my new Husky instruction and safety manual. The bar will start becoming mushroom shaped when looked at from the end with no chain in it. Also, remove the chain and bar, and rub your fingertips lightly FROM THE CENTER OUTWARD. If you feel a lip on the outer edge of the bar, it is worn. BE CAREFUL, as you can cut your fingers. They say to just file it flat again. If it is worn too much, the chain won't seat in there, and you will see a small space between the chain and the bar.
They said to turn the bar over EVERY DAY to get it to wear evenly
Steve
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SteveB wrote:

As usual...
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Dean,
When the bottom of the chain hits the bottom of the bar channel or the two channels on the bar wear down allowing the chain to ride not touching the bar then its time to get a new one. Can't say by time wise because it depends on friction, proper use of oil, etc. A worn bar will cause the chain to go bad quicker.
dean wrote:

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The other thing to watch for is the bar wearing unevenly from side to side. This will make cuts go off a straight line and start to curve. Also watch for 'bluing', the discoloration of the bar because of overheating caused by underoiling.
Charlie

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IME, until the sprocket bearing (in the tip) fails. With proper sharpening and chain-lube.
Dull chain really shortens bar life; ditto lack of lube.
Cutters dulled on one side (e.g. from stone contact) can wear one side of rail, making chain sit at an angle. Then you have a circle-cutter. Pretty easy to check and true-up, so long as groove is deep enough to let chain sit on rails after.
HTH, J
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