Is It FLAT Roof Time For Your Home? In Cincinnati we use RUBBER!

The Truth About EPDM Rubber Roofs As Shared By ROOF TIME LLC
* EPDM Rubber: What it is and why it lasts so long. * Proper Care: What manufacturers actually recommend * How to keep your EPDM rubber roof clean & looking like new.
Overview EPDM is one of the most versatile and long lasting materials ever manufactured for outdoor exposure. Most industry experts consider EPDM rubber roofing membrane the most dependable, most cost effective and easiest to maintain roofing material there is. At ROOF TIME LLC we love to use the EPDM roofs for flat roofing applications becasue of Cincinnati's extreme winters.
EPDM stands for Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer.
Engineering specifications describe EPDM as, "Ideal for outdoor applications because of its excellent resistance to ultra-violet light, ozone, oxidants and severe weather conditions."
EPDM rubber roofing membrane is made to last 20 years or longer and has a 10 to 12 year guarantee depending on the brand. The guarantee does not require the use of any protective 'roof treatment' or 'roof protector' product and recommends only cleaning. Unlike natural rubber (latex) or blends (tires & wiper blades), EPDM does not require periodic applications of any product to protect it from ultra-violet light or ozone. The statement or implication that you should purchase and apply a product to "protect" your rubber roof from the elements is misinformation. Buying and using such a product can be a mistake and may even damage the EPDM membrane. Roof Time LLC forbids our repair crews from ever using "tar" as a repair option on rubber roofs.
Petroleum distillates (black tar) are incompatible with and should never be used on EPDM.
Engineering specifications rate EPDM's solvent and oil resistance as "POOR".
Dicor's Care and Maintenance instructions warn: "CAUTION: DO NOT use cleaners or conditioners containing petroleum solvents, harsh abrasives or citric based cleaners. You may cause irreparable damage to your roof." Laboratory tests conducted in July of 1996 evaluated the effect of a leading "roof treatment" product on EPDM roofing membrane using standard sunlamp and immersion testing procedures. The "roof treatment", which contained petroleum distillates, caused a 63% mass change (swelling). In the summary/recommendations portion of the lab test the scientists stated they would recommend the "roof treatment" and more tellingly noted, "Per the MSDS, this product contains petroleum distillates, a substance that is known to be INCOMPATIBLE with EPDM sheeting".
And don't be fooled by names such as "organic solvent","hydrocarbon carrier", etc. Petroleum distillates by any other name should NEVER be applied to EPDM. If you aren't sure about a product, contact the manufacturer and have them send you a copy of the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). Look under the section entitled "HAZARDOUS INGREDIENTS". If it lists any petroleum distillates, do not use it on EPDM.
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Since when do engineering specifications use words like 'ideal'? That's not an engineering specification, nor a specification at all - it's a description taken from an article or advertising literature. Let's see if I can find it...
Yep, here it is: http://www.google.com/search?num 0&hl=en&safe=off&client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla%3Aen-US%3Aofficial&hs‹Y&q=%22because+of+its+excellent+resistance+to+ultra-violet+light%2C+ozone%2C%22&btnG Which one did you lift it from? Don't feel bad, those people lifted it as well.
I would appreciate it if you could at least edit it to correct errors such as the hyphenated ultraviolet, and the clueless use of 'engineering specifications' that show the writer has no clue what a specification is. That would show initiative and be most pleasing to the reader - plus some substantial change would make it a copyrightable work and then no one could steal it like you did.
R
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Roof Time LLC wrote:

Thank you for sharing. Does it come in butt plugs?
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Dear HeyBub:

...
Wasn't that what posted? I think they have entire rubber suits available, should that person stop posting commercial message on usenet.
I especially like the part where if someone in a few years accidentally applies a standard petroleum-based rooftop seal, the entire rubber sheet fails. Funny they felt like sharing that tidbit in a newsgroup that is archived for years.
David A. Smith
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