Is it entirely me, or does the cheap chainsaw share the blame?

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Meat Plow wrote:

Well, actually, it did stay on and I actually did put it to the limb when it became patently clear I had screwed up...iirc, it didn't jump, just smoked really nicely... :)
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On Tue, 10 Jul 2007 13:43:44 -0500, dpb wrote:

I thought the drive teeth were hooked slightly? Now you're going to make me go have a look. Wait I may have one hanging in the garage.....yup, chain off my old Poulan. Drive teeth shaped like a curved dolphin fin with a notch in it. Man I just don't see how that would mesh with the drive sprocket but I'll take your word for it.
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Meat Plow wrote:

Well, thankfully that only happened once and it has been a few years now (and I'm getting older :) ) but best I can recall it did hang on. It's a small Echo (JD-yellow but Echo-made w/ an Oregon bar). How much difference there is between various vendors' designs and for differing chain sizes I don't have a clue. Being where trees don't grow wild, need for a chainsaw is pretty minimal and this is the only one I've ever had any dealings/experience with.
I can readily believe others might well not behave the same...
--


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On Tue, 10 Jul 2007 14:17:41 -0500, dpb wrote:

My back yard is wooded bliss. Well blissful until it storms and branches and limbs come down :) So I needed a decent saw that stayed in shape. I've seen many tree companies use Stihl so that was my choice and I'm glad I bought one. I also have a Craftsman vac/mulcher/chipper that gets used a lot.
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Meat Plow wrote:

We have quite a number of trees in the yard (mostly 'Chinese elm' by the locals, but I have since learned they're actually Siberian) which are hardy enough for the heat and dry weather with a little help and ash (which are terribly susceptible to borers, unfortunately). The elms in particular are very weak-limbed and we lose twigs/branches regularly every blow, which is quite often here. We've also had two major ice events the last three years that took out a bunch of stuff so the saw has had a workout recently.
The ash isn't too bad when it's green, but trying to trim out the dead after it's been a couple of years is like trying to cut ironwood...
When in VA had a large yard full of huge (red, mostly) oak and the leaves and acorns drove me nuts (so to speak, pun intended...) :(
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On Tue, 10 Jul 2007 14:40:37 -0500, dpb wrote:

I have maples, oaks, shaggy bark chestnuts and some dogwoods. The squirrels take care of the acorns and nuts pretty well but I get a lot of new trees popping up where they've buried them. Last fall we gathered thirty contractor sized bags of mulched leaves for the township to haul away for free. Thank god for that Craftsman chipper/mulcher/vac. Bought it like new for a hundred bucks at a yard sale where the woman was selling it and other tools after her hubby died suddenly. The year prior I had two sets of 30 each contractor bags of unmulched leave to haul away.
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Meat Plow wrote:

They can manage to keep a few dogwoods hanging on in town where they're more protected, but no dice on the farm. Do have one old redbud that Mom planted when she first married Dad in early 40s. It's about 18" in diameter of the main trunk and managed to get to _maybe_ 18-20 ft max tall before the borers killed the main trunk. I cut it back thinking it was dead when we moved back but never got around to pulling the trunk and to my surprise it came out w/ renewed vigor the following spring. I've now let it spring up more bush-like w/ a half-dozen suckers and in the last several years they've reached 80% of the old crown height...
Folks tried a few maples and oaks but the soil isn't acidic like they like here so they didn't make it. Hackberry and cottonwood both do reasonably well. No that there are the "cottonless" varieties, I'll probably put some out as they fluttery leaf like the aspen is really nice in the wind.
We have one really nice American elm specimen that story goes came up after the "Dirty 30s" from the roots when all the rest were killed by the dirt/drought. I keep intending every spring to save some seed pods but forgot again this year to collect. That's busy farming time so little stuff like that gets set aside for more pressing things...
Anyway, in VA I would haul away one or two full longbed pickup loads of nothing but acorns almost every year. They would be inches deep over the entire lot -- pick 'em up w/ scoop shovel w/o any gathering together required. Eventually, wised up and thinned the oaks considerably... :)
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A Stihl 041 did it (not me). A Homelight XL12 did it (me). Brand has not effect on it, all chains and drive sprockets are designed to the same specs.
Harry K
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Yes, it will drive quite well backwards...at least enough to smoke the chain when trying to cut that way. BTDT.
Harry K
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There really is only one chainsaw. www.stihlusa.com
--
Steve Barker







"Toller" < snipped-for-privacy@Yahoo.com> wrote in message
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I'm Sorry! <g>. I've had a Stihl chainsaw for over 20 years and I can go out and start it any day of the year within 3 pulls. Best tools I've ever owned. I always carry a file with me to keep the chain sharp when I'm using it. It doesn't take much to sharpen a chain and they cut a lot better if you keep them sharp. I bought a Craftsman leaf blower and went through three of them before I finally insisted on getting my money back and then I bought a Stihl blower. Expect to pay twice as much for a good one, but if you take care of it it should be the only one you'll ever need to buy.
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http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?pid136069000&vertical=Sears&BV_UseBVCookie=Yes
Since no one else asked I will.
Did you start the engine?
You say you used it very little, but did it ever hit the dirt or a stone in that time? That will dull a chain in seconds.
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What's that noise?? What's that noise??
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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As long as the motor is running normally, any problems cutting is due to the chain/bar. Read your manual if you don't have one and it will give you tips on running it and how to sharpen chain. Most of the problems with the big box cheapos (craftsman) are due to leaving gas in them for extended periods and then not running well (if at all) when the carb cruds up. Once running they should cut the same as the expensive ones, just not as fast.
Harry K
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I always use Stihl oil for my Stihl chain saw and never had a problem. Last time I bought some of their oil I finally ready the bottle trying to figure out why it cost more. That was when I realized it has a Fuel Stabilizer in the oil to keep the gas fresh. It's worth paying a little more for it. That is why the saw can sit for months and start right up.
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It was so dull I had to compare it to the diagram to be sure it wasn't on backwards...
It hasn't been used much, so I presume I "must" have gotten it into the dirt, but I don't recall doing that. Is it possible it came dull?
I realize there is no accurate answer to this, but how many cuts through 12" fresh pine should it be able to do before it needs to be sharpened, if dirt is avoided? 1? 10? 100? 1000?
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You should be cutting for half a day or a day before you are worrying about sharpening anything.
Just a few questions. First, forget the diagram. Go get and saw and look at it. The teeth have two elements: a rake and a cutting surface. The chain spins from the top to the tip to the bottom. The chain cuts on the bottom and pulls the saw towards you.
On the top of the bar, when you look at the teeth, there should be a rake in the front of the tooth, a small gap then the sharpened surface. The sharpened surface should be pointing forward, on the top of the chain.
On the bottom of the bar, the teeth should form a slight sag and be slightly away from the chain, but the guides should still be inside the bar.
Got get the chainsaw and push the safety shield all of the way away from you. Now pull it all of the way back towards you. Next, go start the chainsaw and open it up full throttle. It should make a heck of a noise and sound like a chainsaw. The blade should be spinning WAY beyond what you can see and their shouldn't be any apparent drag on the motor -- it shouldn't sound like it's working.
Also, when you gas it up, do you add oil to the chain's reservoir? How much oil gets used when you burn a tank of gas?
Try this, look at the saw, and get back to us and someone will be able to help.
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On Wed, 11 Jul 2007 09:00:34 -0700, Pat

50 or so then sharpen with a chain saw file and do another 50.
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Toller wrote:

Not likely ___________

White pine? Yellow pine? Dry? Wet? When you start to get saw dust instead of wood flakes, sharpen it.
--

dadiOH
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Toller wrote:
SNIPS

16" - 30" Doug fir, properly lifted with a Peavy, or up on sawbucks, or *very* carefully ground cut 2/3, rolled and cut the other 1/3, maybe 300 rounds cut. Keep it out of the dirt.

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