is humidifier heating or helping to cool the basement?

I have an open floor plan design with the recreation room slightly below ground level. It used to be humid in summer with central air in the house to the point that carpet was becoming wet in places. Will dehumidifier help? Will it work againts the airconditioning heating house, or will it help cooling it (it will lover the humidity thus increase evaporation inthe house and evaporating water will help cool the house?
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On a purely temperature basis, it will raise the temp. But the decrease in humidity will add to the comfort. Though I'm a little surprised, I'd have thought with central A/C that even a room "slightly below ground level" would never be humid enough to have a wet carpet. Sure you don't have water seeping in from below?
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Pawel wrote:

Well humid air will take more energy to heat because it can hold more heat. Dry air is easier to heat, but it holds less heat.
Dry air takes less energy to cool since it cant hold as much heat as humid air.
But its all relative. 75 degrees and dry can feel just like 70 degrees and humid. They both can be holding the same amount of energy.
Neither. What you feel is not the 'temperature' around you. What you feel is the rate of heat loss to your surrounding environment. We call that temperature but its not the same thing.
Lowering the humidity in the house will be helping the air conditioner. it means the air can hold less energy and will thus be easier to cool. Simply lowering the humidity in the house will make the house feel cooler automatically (though it wont be reflected on the thermometer)
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CL Gilbert
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You may well find that difference is insignificant and irrelevant. Nick
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snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

perhaps in terms of energy, but not in terms of comfort. If you can turn your A/C thermostat to 72 instead of 68, you may save energy. Given the difference on energy between 68 and 72 is bigger than the energy used by the humidifier.
But the a/c already does its own dehumidification, so it really needs to be tested. I would suspect A/C on its own would do the job, but I live in relatively non-humid area.
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CL Gilbert
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You were talking about energy.
If you can turn your A/C thermostat to 72 instead of 68, you may save energy.
Sure. Altho both seem rather cold.

Humidifier? I'm having trouble understanding this sentence.

And puts all its latent heat and electrical energy outdoors.
Nick
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it will work both for and against the A/C
for it, in humidity maintenance
against it on heat production
overall, it will same you money and make you more comfortable, and cause the A/C to run much less overall
get a dehumidifier

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More against it.

It will cause the AC to run a lot more, IMO.

Nonononono.
Nick
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