Is changing a leaking heating coil for an oil/forced hot air furnace a DIY project


I have an oil/hot air furnace. I have a service agreement with my local oil company where they cover very minor repairs. Well, the repairman diagnosed a water leak coming from my heating coil. He mentioned that I can probably get it replaced cheaper from a local plumber or even DIY.
However, I called my local plumbing supply store and they said that chaning a heating coil for an oil burner is not a DIY project?
I only have basic plumbing and electric skills. I can weld copper pipes on my pool heater and can replace PVC plumbing.
Are there any generic instructions for changing the heating coil, so I can see what I am getting into. If this is not a DIY project can you please let me know?
The oil furnace is made by Weil-McLain and the heating coil is encolsed in a metal conainer that is 22 inches wide and 17 inche depth.
Thanks much,
Lawrence M. Seldin, CMC, CPC
Contributing writer to FUTURES Magazine Author of RECRUITSOURCE PEOPLESOFT EXAM and RECRUITSOURCE SAP/R3 EXAM Author of POWER TIPS FOR THE APPLE NEWTON and INTRODUCTION TO CSP
NOTE: To send me an email, remove TAKEOUT from my email address: snipped-for-privacy@seldin.net
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On Apr 10, 8:10 am, "Lawrence M. Seldin, CMC, CPC"

Unless this particular coil is made w/ compression or other threaded fittings, I'd agree your skill set/level doesn't sound up to the task...sounds like a job for the pro.
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A water heating coil on a hot air furnace? Does this exist? If it does, I've never seen one.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

The "water leak" is most likely condensation from the coil, which means he is most probably leaking combustion byproducts, ie carbon monoxide, into the house also. You would need to tear the entire furnace down to get to the heat exchanger coil. Some coils are fastened to the heat exchanger with screws. There is most likely a seal you would need to replace also. Leave it to a competent hvac contractor as you could poison your family with carbon monoxide if you don't do it to the letter.
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Guys,
Thank you for the info.
Much appreciated.
Lawrence M. Seldin, CMC, CPC
Contributing writer to FUTURES Magazine Author of RECRUITSOURCE PEOPLESOFT EXAM and RECRUITSOURCE SAP/R3 EXAM Author of POWER TIPS FOR THE APPLE NEWTON and INTRODUCTION TO CSP
NOTE: To send me an email, remove TAKEOUT from my email address: snipped-for-privacy@seldin.net
NOTE: My web home page: www.seldin.net
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So, how can you get water to leak out of a hot air furnace? Did I miss something here?
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
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On Tue, 10 Apr 2007 22:08:32 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

Hot air water.

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Stormin Mormon wrote:

During combustion certain gases form. In high efficiency furnaces, the burnt gases are routed through a coil, usually stainless steel, that is mounted to the heat exchanger by a small purge blower. Most of the heat is extracted from those gases and condensation forms in the coil, which is usually drained out through a hose or pipe, into a floor drain. If the coil develops a leak, the condensation leaves the coil through that breach in the coil instead of being drained out the tube. If water can escape then so can the cooled combustion gases. Carbon monoxide is one of those gases. It can make you ill or even kill you in your sleep.
This is as technical as I need to get. If anyone has anything to add, please do.
Oh, I have 23 1/2 years experience in the hvac field.
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