Is any of this false? Is any of this true?

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Is any of this false? Is any of this true?
"Most disposals of are of a builders-grade quality, and the blades rust off within two to four years.
Dull or rusted blades mean that your disposal may sound like it is working but it's not. The number one cause of kitchen singk clogs is old disposals.
Without sharp blades or blades at all, the food you put down there simply goes right into the drain, causing potential for future stoppage.
A simple test for most disposals is to take a flashlight and look down into it. Do you see rust and corrosion? Can you see any blades?"
This is part of a column in a local magazine, written by a plumber, who gives his email address and url.
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Q: "Most disposals of are of a builders-grade quality, and the blades rust off within two to four years.
A. You would have to have some extreme water chemistry issues going on for that to be truthful... So bad in fact that your copper water piping would be springing leaks if you sneezed too hard or slammed a door...
Q. Dull or rusted blades mean that your disposal may sound like it is working but it's not. The number one cause of kitchen sink clogs is old disposals.
A. Dull blades would mean your disposal would have to work harder and longer to clear what you put down into it... Rusted blades ? Well I mean that could effect performance maybe but not by much a rusty knife will still cut things...
As far as the number one cause of kitchen sink clogs being old disposals, I would disagree, it more often has to do with what is being ground up by the disposal and the failure to allow enough time to wash the ground up food particles through your home's drain lines... I have seen problems especially in homes where Rice is a major portion of the diet with ground up Rice sticking in the drain lines and reforming into a solid clog if it is allowed to sit in the pipe... It all depends on where the clog forms... Clogs are less likely with any disposal if you allow the water to run for a little bit of time after the disposal clears itself of food waste...
Q. Without sharp blades or blades at all, the food you put down there simply goes right into the drain, causing potential for future stoppage.
A. It is not so much that the blades are sharp, it is that they are there sweeping around the perforated edges of the disposal to grind the food against that outer edge... Works by brute force sort of like the grinding machines which can turn an old car into confetti...
It is true that smaller food stuffs like rice grains can sometimes fit past the perforations in the outer edge of the disposal chamber and yes they would be more likely to clog your pipes especially farther down the drain lines if any hair gets past the traps in your bathroom fixtures...
Q. A simple test for most disposals is to take a flashlight and look down into it. Do you see rust and corrosion? Can you see any blades?
A. The "blades" are usually two short and strong pieces of darker metal bolted onto the steel disc at the bottom of your disposal... Most people who might be looking into their disposal with a flashlight might not know that the "blades" along with the perforated disc are what get rid of the food, it is not like a food processor which has actual sharp blades or anything like that... If you could visibly see rust or corrosion in your disposal you have water chemistry issues you need to deal with or you are looking into an extremely old disposal...
~~ Evan
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re: "The "blades" are usually two short and strong pieces of darker metal bolted onto the steel disc at the bottom of your disposal"
Those parts are commonly referred to as the impellers, not blades.
re: "Most disposals of are of a builders-grade quality, and the blades rust off within two to four years."
I can't imagine that anyone would claim that the impellers would rust off in 2 to 4 years. They ask "Can you see any blades?" For the impellers to completely disappear in 2 to 4 years is pretty close to impossible.
By blades, I assume that they are referring to the sharp protrusions on the shredder ring.
That said, for the shredder ring to have lost all it's "blades" in 2 to 4 years seems a bit far fetched also.
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On Tue, 24 May 2011 03:10:49 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Right, when most people hear blade, they think of a blender or food processor.

IIUC they just hit the food, beat it to death, they don't cut it.
So there either are no blades, or nothing that looks like what most people think blades look like. Yet he wants people to judge their disposal by its blades.

It seems so far to me that this guy is lying to get business.
What about these words, "Very loud disposals indicate cheaper models, that don't last very long. Definitely have a plumber come out and look at it... Replacing a disposal today will prevent a stoppage later on"
And for the first question he answers, for someone whose toilet runs, "You should have your toilet checked for other potential problems. Many people don't consider all the parts in the tank that can wear out over time and can cause an even more serious leak through your ceiling. A good plumber will assess the overall condition of your toilet and if it's an older model, can give you options on replacing it with a lower consumption toilet that will save you even more money in the end."
I'm a friend of a friend of the publisher of the magazine, and I know she's an honorable woman who probalby knows nothing about plumbing. She probably thinks she's doing a community service by running this column, and helping an honest guy get business, and I think maybe I should strip off the names and send her the comments here, or get her to check this stuff out with a good plumber (Athough I don't know who. I havent' needed a plumber since I've been here and I don't know any.) Should I email her?
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re: "So there either are no blades, or nothing that looks like what most people think blades look like. Yet he wants people to judge their disposal by its blades."
re: " IIUC they just hit the food, beat it to death, they don't cut it"
Some sites do refer to the protrusions on the shredder disk as blades and that's what I think he is referring to. The impellers force the food up against the shredder disk where the "blades" shred the food into smaller pieces.
I wouldn't argue if someone called that "cutting it".
I'm not a plumber, and I haven't seen all that many disposals, although I've installed a few. All I'm saying is that claiming that *most* disposals only last 2 - 4 years because the "blades" rust off of the shredder disk seems like a stretch to me. Maybe that's because I've never installed a low-end disposal.
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wrote:
Thanks Derby Dad and thanks, everyone.

I thought the only part that could leak without the user noticing it is the wax ring, and that normally they last forever. Until you remove the toilet for some other reason.
So isn't this false too that all the parts wear out over time and can cause an even more serious leak?????
I've never had a leak from the tank either, except into the bowl, which doesn't hurt my ceiling.
How long does the wax ring normally last?
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re: "I thought the only part that could leak without the user noticing it is the wax ring,
and
re: "I've never had a leak from the tank either, except into the bowl, which doesn't hurt my ceiling. "
It may not hurt your ceiling but it could hurt your bank account.
If the tank leaks into the bowl, then eventually the tank will need to refill. It's very possible that you might not notice it depending on where the toilet is located and how often you use it. That's just wasted water.
There are innards with a "leak sentry" - basically a clip and chain that prevents the float from goin down unless the handle is used. You'd eventually notice the leak with one of those because the tank could conceivably empty out completely.
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On Tue, 24 May 2011 10:58:45 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Well, I would notice mine. I can here the water running in the pipe, and I visit every bathroom at least once a month and would hear and see the water running. My point was that there is need to replace the whole toilet just to stop it from leaking into the bowl. Even if you might not notice, all one needs to do is replace the --- I forget the name -- the black rubber thing that goes up, then flops back down and plugs the tanks and keeps the toilet from running.

This could help some people. Maybe me. The sound in my head sounds like water running in a pipe, so some day I may not be able to tell real water from the water in my head.
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re: "My point was that there is need to replace the whole toilet just to stop it from leaking into the bowl."
I'm not defending the "plumber" in the article, but I think you may have missed the point.
I did not read what was written to mean that the plumber was going to replace the toilet regardless of what the problem was. I read it to mean that as part of the evaluation of the problem, the plumber might recommend replacing an older toilet with a water saving model instead of repairing the old one.
He comes in to determine the cause of the leak and finds that it's a simple fix - the flapper. He also notices a hairline, but not leaking, crack in the tank, or maybe more rust than he likes around the bolts that hold the tank to the bowl, or maybe the johnny bolts are so rusted he's afraid that the toilet might loosen up.
As it says, he will "assess the overall condition of your toilet and if it's an older model"..."give you options on replacing it with a lower consumption toilet."
It doesn't say he was going to walk in and rip it out, leaving you with no choice but to replace it. It even specifically says he would only offer you replacement options if it was an *older* model.
I see nothing wrong with those statements. In fact, I think a plumber would be remiss if he didn't suggest a water saving toilet as a option over the repair of an older model.
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<stuff snipped>
<<There are innards with a "leak sentry" - basically a clip and chain that prevents the float from goin down unless the handle is used. You'd eventually notice the leak with one of those because the tank could conceivably empty out completely.>>
I am having trouble visualizing this. Do you have a brand name or some oth . . .
Never mind, I just checked Google. I coudn't imagine how that worked with a big lever action ball type float. It doesn't. (-: It's a columnar float.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
-- Bobby G.
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On 5/24/2011 5:10 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Good answers.
Personally, I think, some people tend to treat their GD like trash cans and a lot of the drain clogging issues could be solved by throwing waste in the trash. Some women (I won't mention any names here) think the GD is a magic device that can dispose of anything. Common sense tells you that overuse can lead to problems. It doesn't help when some cities actually encourage GD use to feed their green agendas.
Jim
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We all know who you're talking about.

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I would copy this thread and send it to the publiisher of the local magazine, politely telling her that the plumber is way off base and she is hurting the reputation of the magazine by publishing such garbage. The plumber might be paying to have the column run as a subliminal form of advertising, Then the publisher has a real dilemma.
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On Tue, 24 May 2011 10:01:00 -0700 (PDT), "hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net"

Thank you. I was hoping someone would say this, though I might well have done it even if no one did. I've been out since the last time I post

I'm pretty sure she'll cancel him even if pays.
It doesn't say "advertisement", on the border in small print. Is that required? Maybe one only sees it when an ad looks like news. I don't remember seeing it over a plumbing, etc. advice column. Maybe we are supposed to know that is advertising.
But my ex, who's very cynical and up on this sort of thing, didnt' realize how many questions on Jeopardy are paid advertising. They were too subtle for her.
Even if I finish the letter and write tonight, she's going to take some time to verify what I say, I'm sure. I'm going to suggest she look in her own garbaage disposal and her friends'. It's a monthly, and I have no idea when the deadline for the next issue is.
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I've never had a garbage disposal - or a clogged kitchen sink. Food scraps always go in the garbage can. I don't get garbage disposals. Why do they exist?
--Vic
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For the convenience of those of us who don't want to scrap every last piece of waste off of our plates before washing them.
Easily scrapeable (sp?) big stuff I scrape. Stuck on bits of lettuce, stray kernals of corn, and the pieces of pasta left in the pot I rinse into the disposal.
Unless of course I feel that the built in disposal in the dishwasher can handle it.
To each his own.
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re: Think about the size of the drain pipe. Pretty hard to put anything big enough to clog it down there."
Shortly after I moved into my house, which was about 30 years old at the time, I decided to install a garbage disposal as a house-warming gift to the wife.
The kitchen drain was 2" galvanized pipe which went down into the basement and then ran about 6' to the main stack.
By the time I was done, I had replaced all of the galvanized pipe with PVC. The entire length of pipe from the trap and beyond had barely a 1/2" wide spiraling tunnel through a thick mass of gunk and grease.
I cut the longest section of pipe into 2 foot lengths and you couldn't see a speck of light through any of the sections.
I'm surprised the sink even drained and there was no way I was going to add ground-up foodstuff and not expect it to clog the pipe within a very short period of time.
YMMV
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On Tue, 24 May 2011 13:43:05 -0500, Vic Smith

Many of these things, like electric knives and hand held blenders were created for the industrial or commercial markets, and then cheaper versions were made for home use. I don't if disposals are in this category. The place to look would be on the webpage of the first maker, but sadly, many historic companies say nothing about their past on their webpages, even when afaik there is nothing to be ashamed of. (Others do give their history, but sometimes too short to be interesting, and a few tell really interesting stories.)
I only use mine when little dribs keep the sink from draining, dribs that are so small they would run right down the drain if the disposal weren't in the way. I never put grease in the sink or anything else I shouldn't or in the toilet, and I've never had a clog anywhere in the house, except IN the disposal, which I clear by turning on the disposal. Nor did my mother ever have a clog, when I lived with her and when I didn't. So that's about 108 years between the two of us.
Last time one broke, I thought about getting rid of mine, but I would need something to make the hole smaller, need to attach it so it didn't leak, need a pipe to got to the pipe that is there, and then when I sold the house, the real estate agent would tell me to put one in.
I also don't really scrape my dishes before the dishwasher. Anything that will fall off without scraping falls off, but the rest ends up in that strainer in the bottom, where it gets repeately washed and after 3 or 4 times I think to look there and remove what little I find. Once om 30 years the small drumstick bone did get past the strainer and clog the vacuum break which is mounted to the sink, and then the whole dishwasher wouldn't drain. Took 2 hours to find.

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I'm with you, Jim. Our disposals last & last because we put very little down them. Periodically we grind up lemon rinds for "sterility". We put veg. waste in a crock and then out to the compost heap. Bones, meat & fat go in the garbage can.
I hadn't heard of cities encouraging GD use "to feed their green agendas". Sounds counter-intuitive. Do you have any real live city examples I could check out? Inquiring minds...
HB
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Load of crap. My builder grade one quite after 10 years or so. Nothing was wrong with the macerator, the motor quit. Disposals don't have anything particularly sharp in them, they just beat the food to a pulp..
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