Is a junction box behind clear acrylic considered concealed?

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You may be right, it might be 16" inches. It's been a while since I've torn any walls out.
I might check when I get home. If I recall correctly, I can see the back of a bedroom wall from the access panel for the shower.

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On Mon, 24 Sep 2012 10:35:56 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

One elegant solution might be a floor outlet. Get the correct floor box and you will have plenty of room for your splices and get an extra outlet to boot.
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On Sep 24, 3:18 pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Not a bad idea...not something I want to get into with this project, but certainly something to keep in the old back pocket.
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On Mon, 24 Sep 2012 12:46:01 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Make you access hole ~6" round and a floor box cover will fit when you decide you want one. You can put a couple screws in it and still be "accessible". The only time you need a "no tool" entry is when something has to be "readily accessible" (different thing)
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On 9/23/2012 8:53 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

The NEC uses the wording readily accessible. That means you need to be able to get to it without damaging the building. So if your access panel is easily removable (hinged, pull out without cutting, damaging or disturbing anything etc) you are good. Visibility is not a requirement for what you described.
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What I would like to hear is the word "screwed".
If a plywood panel is screwed across the joists to cover the hole, would removing the screws be considered "disturbing" anything?
Should I just lay the plywood (maybe 12" x 16") in the opening and not screw it down? Maybe add a small hole to make it easy to remove?

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On 9/24/2012 10:47 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Correct...
...
That's fine but...

If this is only a crawl-accessible attic space, what difference does it make about having a solid surface in the end, anyway?
I'd just make the access room needed, install the (metal) junction box w/ whatever blocking scheme is simplest facing up and flush or just under the flooring height and use a metal cover plate and be done...
The possible fly in the ointment is that you may need two or a larger than just a square box if you're having to cut into a run as there possibly won't be sufficient extra length in the existing run to make only a single junction...if it's the end of a run or you have access from another junction point that's simpler.
--



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The hole we made is bigger than just for the junction box. We opened the floor above the fan/light we are installing to make it easier to feed the wires from the source and switches into the junction box that is built into the fan. That's when we discovered that the source wires would barely reach into the fan. and besides even if they did reach, the cloth insulation at the ends was breaking down from heat, movement etc. I decided to cut them back about a foot to good clean insulation, install the junction box and run new romex to the fan. That way I have no cloth covered wire in the fixture.
I'd prefer not to leave the hole above the fan and junction box open in case someone crawls back there or decides to store something back there. It's right around a dark corner and I can imagine someone putting a hand in the hole and hurting themselves or the fan.
Installing the junction box flush with the floor might be possible, but the old source wire runs under a wall into the finished space where it's stapled or attached to the joist in some manner. I don't have a lot of room or much slack. I'm really reluctant to disturb the old wire any more than I need to because of it's condition. Cutting it back and adding the junction box in line with the existing wire is about as much as I want to do. Trust me, if you saw what I was up against, I think you'd agree.
I think I'll go with a drop-in panel, marked to note that there's a junction box below and add 2 finger holes marked with "Lift Here To Open.".
I cut the floorboards back to the center of the joists, so once the panel is dropped in, it can't fall out, tilt or shift, With that solution, the junction box and fixture will be accessible from above.
Thanks for the suggestions.

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On 9/24/2012 12:18 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote: ...

That'll work, too...but if you thought ahead and were careful in the removal process you should be able to just lay the flooring removed back in the opening...
--
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I like the idea of making the box itself directly accessible from the attic floor, using an extender on the box if necessary to bring it up to the attic floor level, and then using a regular solid cover on the box so it is fully covered but easily accessible. In my attic, I did that, but used a cover with a cutout for an duplex outlet so I have an easy place in the attic to plug in a trouble light.
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That's probable...maybe I'll just do that. I could certainly cut a piece of plywood to fit tighter, but I don't know if that's necessary.
Thanks.
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On 9/24/2012 10:43 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Certainly don't see any reason it would be.
--
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The main reason would my anal need for something "more finished" than just lying loose floorboards over a hole.
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On 9/25/2012 3:56 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote: ...

So you'll lay loose ply instead... :)
Either is "fastenable" if desired (if really needed which is unlikely, too...)
--
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You can, if the floorboards are removable. Nail them in place, and you have a Code violation.

Visibility isn't the issue, it's accessibility.
The NEC says that all junction boxes must be "accessible" and defines that term as "capable of being removed or exposed without damaging the building structure or finish or not permanently closed in by the structure or finish of the building."
A junction box located behind a removable solid steel panel, although concealed from sight, is still accessible and therefore Code-compliant; a box behind a clear acrylic panel which has been cemented in place is visible but not accessible and therefore not Code- compliant.
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wrote:

Do screws equate to nails in this instance?
Even though I'm planning on going with a drop-in plywood panel that will just rest on the joists, I'm still curoius...
Is an access panel secured by screws allowed or does "removable" imply no tools required?
BTW, the drop-in panel will have a finger hole so that no tools, such as pry bar, will be required to remove it. We'll let gravity hold it in place.

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wrote:

No, it does not -- a panel secured by screws is fine.

That should be great.
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wrote:

You could put a hinge along one side of the insert to ensure it does not get lost when the cover is opened.
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