Is a 215-lb. safe too heavy to wheel into an apartment building by myself?

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Bill wrote:

I can see you've never tried to get a mother-in-law to move...
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You can get a heavy duty dolly at Harbor Freight for $15 or $20. As others have said 215 isn't very heavy. Imagine wheeling someone down the ramp in a wheelchair.
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wrote:

If he lives in an apratment, he probably doesn't want to buy either a dolly or a hand truck, but otoh, the super should have both.
Bear in mind that a dolly is a lot stronger than a hand truck -- a cheap dolly can handle far more than a handtruck of the same price -- but not quite as easy to use.
And a dolly won't be stymied by the fact that the safe is bigger than the platform at the bottom of the handtruck, which also isn't such a problem if you lean the handtruck way back. But even then you want a second person whether he is strong or not, to keep the handtruck from moving away from you when you are trying to pull back on the handle, etc.
If everything is pretty smooth, you might just be able to use a carpet. Lay the safe on its side and pull on the rug. You can get some rug out of the trash pretty often, or use one of your own. Well, I haven't done anything as heavy as a safe, but it worked really well moving the computer, monitor, printer from one room to the other at my borthers. Didn't have to disconnect anything. He has smooth floors thoughout.

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wrote:

Buddy, we have no trouble bringing it into the house, but it'll be anotehr 200 dollars.

Then get a furniture guy to do it. We's got other things to do.
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wrote:

What is so hard about a rope? You can get 100 feet of cotton clothesline for maybe 4 or 5 dollars. You can make four circles with 100 feet so that the tension on the rope is only the moment in the direction of rolling of 215 pounds divided by 8. That is, even if you were lowering it straight down, it the tension would only be 27 pounds per rope.
At a 30 degree angle, it's 27 pounds times the sine of 30, or the cosine, or tangent or something like that. About 14 pounds.
If you only do three circles, to have more room to walk or to wrap it around your hands that will make it 4/3rds as much or 20 pounds. Even a cotton clothesline can handle 20 pounds.
(wear gloves, just because one is more powerful with gloves on. You don't really need them.)
You need a way to keep it from sliding all the way down to the ground, but you can probably wrap one length around the handle.
I bought 100 feet of clothesline to hold a spinet piano on the back of my full size convertible, to move it from Brooklyn to the Upper West side. By never cutting the rope, I was able to save it for many other uses. So then I kept it as a rope to climb down from my 5th floor window if I couldn't get to the door or fire escape. I've used it to tie a 65 gallon water heater to my compact convertible.
The rope is 28 years old now, and maybe it's not as strong as it was, but I can't tell the difference.
BTW, safes are either for protection from stealing or from fire. I guess if it is big enough it protects against both, but read what it says. Protecting against fire can be very important, especially for bonds and wills and confessions.
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All by yourself - yes it is too heavy. I tried a lateral file - 150 lbs all by myself, I tore a muscle in my back and was out for a while. I'm also 6'2" 250 lbs. Get more than one helper and get a wheeled dolly - not a hand truck.
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When I bought my first safe (a 400lb 1880s type) I had it professionally delivered. I watched carefully. He used a pallet jack, and put aluminum plates on the path, it was a smooth, safe (no pun intended) operation. When I decided to move, I had collected 3 big safes, so I invested in a new pallet jack ($300). That was one of my best investments. The mover told how he had been thrown through a wall delivering to a pier and beam house when a portion of floor collapsed. fortunately he was thrown between studs and didn't get hurt to speak of. After that he started using the aluminum plates on the floor.

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Chris Tsao writes:

Don't use a hand truck.
Use a furniture dolly.
Open the safe and use big C-clamps to attach lumber or steel for handles, and get some friends to help lift it on and off the dolly, and over obstructions.
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On Fri, 03 Aug 2007 00:19:42 -0500, Richard J Kinch

You sound experienced. Eric does also. What do you think about using the wheels that are already on the safe?
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mm writes:

Depends on the wheels.
Yes, I've done this before, and learned how to do it right.
Just use the clamp-on handle trick with the dolly:
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber8970
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