Is 89 or 93 octane gas slicker?

Page 1 of 2  
http://www.tampabay.com/news/business/personalfinance/do-it-yourself-maintenance-help-you-save-on-lawn-mower-repairs/1235927
"Spivey recommends using gasoline with an 89 or 93 octane rating, if you can afford it. The fuel is slicker, which means it won't hang around on your engine valves and other internal parts, eating away at the rubber."
Is this true?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have no lab tests or anything. But, that sounds like nonsense, to me. "Valves" such as intake valves are exposed only air and gas vapor. Exhaust valves, vapors, and, well, exhaust.
Any fuel line parts are in contact with fuel, full time.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
http://www.tampabay.com/news/business/personalfinance/do-it-yourself-maintenance-help-you-save-on-lawn-mower-repairs/1235927
"Spivey recommends using gasoline with an 89 or 93 octane rating, if you can afford it. The fuel is slicker, which means it won't hang around on your engine valves and other internal parts, eating away at the rubber."
Is this true?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 23 Jun 2012 17:57:45 -0400, Jack Legg

No.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jack Legg wrote:

http://www.tampabay.com/news/business/personalfinance/do-it-yourself-maintenance-help-you-save-on-lawn-mower-repairs/1235927
Hi, First, what is Octane value? Why 89 or 93? 91 won't do? What kinda talk is that? I use Shell 91 always, some times 94 blended with Ethanol. Owner's manual always mention about proper gas to use for the engine.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/23/2012 7:12 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

Using too much ethanol in a small engine might burn the engine out. That's what a chain saw repairman for an authorized Stihl dealer and repair centre told me. He said if you can't avoid ethanol based gasoline, get the highest octane available for your small engine because it'll help cut down on pre-ignition
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/23/2012 7:32 PM, Duesenberg wrote:

that's bullshit also.
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/23/2012 9:00 PM, Steve Barker wrote:

Why's that?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Because small engines don't have a high enough compression ratio for pre-ignition to be a problem. If they did, you'd see a lot of recommendations from small engine manufacturers to use higher octane gasoline in say your lawn mower. I've never seen one that calls for anything higher octane than regular.
As for burning the engine out, I've had a lot of small engines over the years in a variety of typical applications. I've yet to see one "burned out". In my experience, as long as you change to oil, make sure it has oil, etc., the end of life has always come due to some other failure. Latest is my Honda self-propelled mower, where the tranny died. Given the age and cost for a new one, decided it wasn't worth it. Engine? It's still running fine on regular unleaded.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/23/2012 8:52 PM, Duesenberg wrote:

Ethanol actually runs cooler, thus the reason for less gas mileage out of it than with gasoline. Ethanol raises the octane rating. The worst thing about ethanol is the fact that it absorbs water (after a great period of time) and it's effect on rubber over a great period of time.
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Ethanol raises the octane rating *because* it burns cooler. Modern (automobile) fuel systems are sealed so there isn't a lot of water to be absorbed. The fuel delivery chain has been upgraded over the last few decades so water isn't an issue there, either. Ethanol won't harm the "rubbers" used in fuel systems, though methanol will. The problem with ethanol is that it *does* burn cooler so has less energy content (lowers gas mileage).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/23/2012 5:57 PM, Jack Legg wrote:

http://www.tampabay.com/news/business/personalfinance/do-it-yourself-maintenance-help-you-save-on-lawn-mower-repairs/1235927
Teh author also claims:
"Old fuel and various debris can collect inside gaskets in the carburetor. Cleaning the gaskets is a simple process, but one that should be carried out only by an experienced mechanic, as it involves disconnecting the fuel tank from the rest of the mower."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mower? I thought we were talking about cars. I'm so, totally terrified. Teh author claims it should be carried out (not done, it's too simple to "done") by experienced mechanic? And, to think I've risked my life so many times, working teh lawn mower? I'm amazed to be alive. I'm so grateful, God! I'll even go to church tomorrow! [sarcasm off, now]
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 6/23/2012 5:57 PM, Jack Legg wrote:

http://www.tampabay.com/news/business/personalfinance/do-it-yourself-maintenance-help-you-save-on-lawn-mower-repairs/1235927
Teh author also claims:
"Old fuel and various debris can collect inside gaskets in the carburetor. Cleaning the gaskets is a simple process, but one that should be carried out only by an experienced mechanic, as it involves disconnecting the fuel tank from the rest of the mower."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

89-octane is also known as "Regular". This is the cheapest grade your gas station sells. 93-octane is also known as "Premium". This is usually the most expensive grade your station sells. Usually there's also a mid-grade that's 91-octane.
Next time you fill up, take a look at the stickers on the pump near the buttons where you select the grade you want. Also, your engine's valves do not have any rubber on them.
Octane has zero to do with how "slick' the gas is. Rubber-deterioration has to do with the ETHANOL in the gas. All gasoline engines since about 1975 are rated for up to 10% ethanol. This means that the polymers present in the fuel system are able to withstand the damaging effects of alcohols up to a 10% concentration.
--
Tegger

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'll have to tell them to change their stickers, immediately. I've been to several gas stations this week, and they mistakenly had 87 octane for sale. I'll tell them to correct the labels, imediately. After all, invalid at example dot com said so.
I only have to look NEXT time? I usually look every time.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
89-octane is also known as "Regular". This is the cheapest grade your gas station sells.
93-octane is also known as "Premium". This is usually the most expensive grade your station sells.
Usually there's also a mid-grade that's 91-octane.
Next time you fill up, take a look at the stickers on the pump near the buttons where you select the grade you want. Also, your engine's valves do not have any rubber on them.
Octane has zero to do with how "slick' the gas is. Rubber-deterioration has to do with the ETHANOL in the gas. All gasoline engines since about 1975 are rated for up to 10% ethanol. This means that the polymers present in the fuel system are able to withstand the damaging effects of alcohols up to a 10% concentration.
--
Tegger



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Oops, sorry. I messed up.
87-octane is "Regular" 89-octane is "mid-grade" 91-octane is usually "Premium"
93-octane would be a super-premium, and is not offered by all companies.
In any case, as I said before, octane has nothing to do with "slickness", and it has nothing to do with how destructive the gas is to the polymeric components of the fuel system. Destructiveness is a function of alcohol- content.
--
Tegger

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
But.... but... but..... I read it on the internet! (Don't worry about it. I maik mistakes, too.)
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

Oops, sorry. I messed up.
87-octane is "Regular" 89-octane is "mid-grade" 91-octane is usually "Premium"
93-octane would be a super-premium, and is not offered by all companies.
In any case, as I said before, octane has nothing to do with "slickness", and it has nothing to do with how destructive the gas is to the polymeric components of the fuel system. Destructiveness is a function of alcohol- content.
--
Tegger



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/23/2012 9:11 PM, Tegger wrote:

In Ohio 91 is ethanol free 93 is 91 + ethanol
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/23/2012 7:32 PM, Tegger wrote:

ACTUALLY, the standard regular unleaded is 87.
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, you're right. See my other reply, to Stormin' Mormon.
--
Tegger

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 6/23/2012 4:57 PM, Jack Legg wrote:

http://www.tampabay.com/news/business/personalfinance/do-it-yourself-maintenance-help-you-save-on-lawn-mower-repairs/1235927
LMAO!!
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.