Inventors and/or manufacturers I want to Kill

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On Sun, 05 Mar 2006 22:25:35 GMT, "Rick Brandt"

Once, I heard a story about what it would be like to use metric for everything. Something like drinking 5961 milliliters of milk and eating 2492 milligrams of egg. Then watching a football game where a player is on the 93.674 meter line.

BTW, the "calories" in food are actually Calories (kilocalories, also called large calories).
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Mark Lloyd
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wrote:

Well, in cooking, most measurments and portions would be adjusted slightly to the nearest round metric number. Thus, the 'standard' drinking glass would probably grow slightly to become the 'standard 25 ml. glass'.
The unit of measure for eggs would probably remain what it is under the current system: the egg, 1 each.
Sports fields could be adjusted (making a football field 100 meters) but would require two sets of record books. I believe track and field has pretty much already made this adjustment, with most tracks being built to 400 meteres instead of 400 yards, but it is much more an international sport than American football. Probably better to leave football and baseballs fields alone, with the use of yards, feet, and inches being considered a 'quaint' historic relic. How far is it from pitchers mound to home plate in thoroughly metric Japan?

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On Sun, 05 Mar 2006 22:00:20 -0600, Ed Stevens

Probably. There used to be a lot of that 'conversion' nonsense, and it could explain why some people don't like metric.

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snipped-for-privacy@nospam.noway says...

Can't have that. Gotta have a smaller glass and keep the price the same.

;-)

The track event changed from 440Yds (1/4 mile) to 400M, which is only about 1/2% shorter. No biggie there, though when measuring down to the thousanths of a second...

I'm fairly sure it's still 66'6", so let's call it 20.3M.
<snip>
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Keith

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wrote:

DOH! Yes, 440 yards, not 400. I've been away from track and field too long. (Ran the 2-mile on my HS track team, but that was back in the 60's)

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Rick Brandt wrote:

I agree. I spent many tours overseas and had a complete set of metric measureing tools plust the usual household maintainance items. Hated it when I retired and had to go back to this abortion we call a system.
One of the dumbest arguements against the metric tool system was from a mechanic.
"I wouldn't be able to tell what wrench to grab". I pointed out that he doesn't know now in that when he needs a 9/16 he doesn't grab a "9/16" he grabs one "that size" and it would be the same in metric except simpler as there are fewer choices.
Sorta OT. When did Great Britain do away with the Whitworth bolt/nut sizes? Back in the 60s IIRC a mechanic had to have all 3 sizes of wrenches.
Harry K
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On Sun, 05 Mar 2006 22:25:35 GMT, "Rick Brandt"

Exactly. I've never understood the fuss. After all, just how long *is* a meter? Answer: It's the distance between two marks on a stick calibrated for such. Same answer as "How long is a foot?"
How much is a liter? How much is a quart? Same answer for both: The amount of liquid to fill up a properly calibrated measuring container to a specific mark.
Who gives a fig about conversion? When working in metric, you use measuring devices calibrated in metric. You measure to the marks indicated. Just like when working with "British" ("American").

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Where it matters most, and where people would probably use it the most is in the grocery store. The initial conversion would matter to know whether or not you're getting ripped of in qty/price.
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Larry Bud wrote:

BS. That is a strawman argument trying to justify being bull headed about changing. If they were going to rip you off during the conversion, they would do it. Nothing you would be able to do about it even if you -did- know they were doing it other than shop down the street where they also would be doing it.
I gaurantee that withing a week of conversion you wouldn't even notice and would soon recognize the idiocy trying to compare sizes of the new to the old.
Harry K
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

Right. It makes equal spacing of marks, conversions, all sorts of things, trivial. You could have fourth graders doing layout with the metric system.
It's like language. English, being a hodgepodge (is that one word?), is ridiculously complex. It's like they purposefully took the worst aspects of several languages. Compare that with Italian. After about the age of seven, there's no Italian word that an Italian kid can't spell - it's essentially a phonetic language. How many people on this newsgroup are asked, "How do you spell that?", about their own _name_? It's inefficient and stupid to make things needlessly complex.
Look at the metric thing this way. Being one of the three third world countries that is hung up on the _Imperial_ system, how do you think that affects our exports to other countries? We're cutting our own throats so we can keep on using an arcane system that is apparently designed to create confusion and mistakes.
R
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A study done years ago found that rates of reading dyslexia were higher in countries with languages like English and French, where spelling and pronounciation were not necessarily consistent, and lower in countries like Russia, Italy, Spain etc where the spelling is essentially phonetic. The difference was pretty significant.
Mike
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wrote:

Yeah, I just love it when I have to keep two sets of wrenches and my car has both types of bolts so all I do is fight to figure out which wrench fits properly and which one is a sloppy fit. And even if I hse a 17MM socket, my ratchet is still a 1/2 inch or 3/8 inch drive, which means I have to constantly use two different standards of measurements. Now, they still sell gasoline in gallons, but sell soda in liters. America did just fine for centuries using the SAE standards. It's obvious that foreign cars will come with metric bolts, and in that case, the owner buys metric tools. But American cars should have SAE bolts, because they were made in America. There is no reason we need to kiss butt to other countries, and all we have done trying to convert is confuse people, such as my car having both type of bolts. Just to adjust the alternator belt I have to use both SAE and Metric wrenches. That is just assenine. The REAL reason they wanted to change was just to sell more tools, sell more of everything else that is not metric, and make life complicated.
I cant wait till they convert gasoline to sell in some metric amount, and stop using the dollar and convert to the pound. That way when I take a 7 pound bag of dog food to the counter, and the store also sells a 10 pound bag, the clerk can ask me if I have a 7 pound or a 10 pound bag, and I will think that is the price they are charging me because the pound is also a term for an amount of money.
All this amounts to is the government making things as complicated as possible, the same way they do it with income tax forms and pretty much anything else they touch.
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snipped-for-privacy@myshop.com wrote:

I am having a very tough time believing you are not a troll. The myopia that passes for your logic is staggering. - Cars that are "Made in America" are assembled here but have parts from all over the world. The only reason your car has two types of bolts, is because of people like you who resist change, even if the new way is far superior. It's like that idiot that everyone knows who is married to the dragon lady but won't divorce her, saying things like, "The devil you know is better than the one you don't." You know, bullshit. - Because of people like you, this is one of the only three third world countries still stuck in the 1800's with the Imperial system of measurement. We're not a colony anymore, get it? There is no more king, we're a country. We no longer have to stick to an archaic measuring system that the country that invented it no longer uses! -You're right that they want to sell more tools, parts and everything else. We also want to _buy_ more tools, parts and everything else. The problem comes in when a metric country/company has to make a choice between setting up two manufacturing lines. One, their standard metric, is already in place, the other, Imperial, has a limited market - the US (Libya and Myanmar). You're argument will undoubtably be, well, we'll make what we need right here, in the good ol' USA. Guess again. If you're willing to fork over $100K for your Chevy, that might work, but where are you getting the $100K from?

A liter is close to a quart. Four liters is close to a gallon. That's all you need to know, and you don't even need to know that.
You'll do what you do right now. You'll keep your eyes open, see a gas station which has lower prices than the rest, pull over and buy some. You'll say, give me $20 bucks or fill 'er up. You won't take out a measuring cup and calculate the conversion. Hell, right now you don't know if you're getting a gallon or not. You just trust that you are.

They'll scan the item, you'll pay for it. What do you care what units are used as long as the net cost to you is reasonable?

On that, at least, we agree.
R
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wrote:

The funnier part is where he assumes that the conversion to metric system requires conversion to the British monetary system! All while the British are converting to the European monetary system.
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You have to admit it's ridiculous that designers don't put ALL metric bolts on a car. Seems like there would be tons of cost savings for them in doing that anyway. My '86 vette has probably 90% metric, 10mm, 13mm, and 15mm being almost all of them.

Leaving the unit of money alone for a minute, because that's never going to happen: This is where you're missing the point. Many people figure out qty/price when buying products. During the intial conversion, most would be left scratching their heads "is $10 for 2.5Kg better or worse than $12 for 5.5 lbs?"
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Larry Bud wrote:

And what difference would it make? You wouldn't have the choice to buy kthe 5.5 lbs one anyhow. Yeah for your sense of outrage you might find that you are now paying a schosh bit more per unit weight but just what would you do about it?
Harry K
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On 6-Mar-2006, snipped-for-privacy@myshop.com wrote:

Centuries? Make that century.

There are more "American" cars made in Ontario, Canada than in Michigan.

Over 6 billion of them vs about 300 million of you. Keep building those walls, eventually you'll be all alone.
You may have opinions; too bad you don't have facts.
Mike
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On 03/06/06 01:11 pm Michael Daly wrote:

Yep. We got an old Dodge Mirada from my father-in-law, who insisted that he would never buy a foreign car. When I looked at the plate on the door frame, I discovered that it was made in Canada. Our '02 Chrysler 300M is the same -- although we knew this ahead of time.
Perce
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wrote:

And most of the "Japanese" cars sold in the U.S. are built in the U.S.
I work at one of those Japanese auto plants. Several years ago I hired a guy to fix my roof. When he was finished we were sitting on my front porch drinking some iced tea and visiting while I made out the check for his services. He knew where I worked and was complaining to the effect of 'yes, they build the cars here, but all the money goes back to Japan.' I handed him his check and said "here's a couple of hundred of their dollars that didn't go to Japan."
Another example: The U.S. Big-3 lobbied congress for a 'domestic content' lable law, requiring auto manufacturers to place a lable on the vehicle stating what percentage of the vehicle was 'domestic content.' Of course the lobbyists helped write the rules of what constituted 'domestic content.' A year after it went into effect, they were lobbying to revoke the law because, even under their own rules, Fords, Chevies, and Chryslers were showing LESS domestic content than U.S. built Hondas, Toyotas, and Nissans.

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There's nothing stopping you from using decimals for inches... .90625)/32 ;-)
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