Interlock locks to be used in lieu of transfer switch

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wrote:

When you have a statement from any credible source that agrees with your position that backfeeding a utility line with a generator is only a safety hazard if the lineman is retarded, please post it. Why don't you start with contacting your local electric company and see what they have to say. Don;t you think it just a little bit strange, that in this whole thread, you're the only one with that position? Or perhaps you're not aware that linemen have been killed by this. Or maybe, by your expertise, they were retarded.

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I am the local electrical utilty. You are confused and blaming unrelated things on lineman stupidity. Trained and legal linesmen do not take these chances. If they ever do, they are not linesmen anymore here.

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Ignoramus23720 writes:

The code inspector is likely to treat this with the same respect he treats a Wilma interlock.
What's a Wilma interlock? A piece of electrical tape across the main breaker handle. What every household was using with a portable generator and suicide cord for a disconnect after Hurricane Wilma here in Palm Beach County, Florida.
Sure, it works, but they won't trust your discipline and brains. Nor should they.
Locking things in a safe? C'mon.
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On May 7, 7:05 pm, Ignoramus23720 <ignoramus23...@NOSPAM. 23720.invalid> wrote:

All juristictions are different but where I am I know the response of the building inspector because it is the same response he gives to EVERYTHING he is not familiar with. It is a response borne of sheer necessity and practicallity.
He will look at the interlock and ask to see the UL listing on it to ensure it is listed for this purpose. No UL listing, no approval. Plain, simple, consistant. Not a lot of creativity there, but a good measure of practicality.
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this is one of those moments, it's best to go with the industry standard. Don't try to make a complicated, and irregular set up of your own.
Incidentally, the disconnects appear to be single pole.
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Christopher A. Young
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Most power companies require "visible disconnect" switches so the lineman can visually check that the home with the generator is disconnected before he start working on restoring the power to the line. Seems like at least one lineman has died in every major storm related outage in my region while repairing lines. Don't think all of these were generator related. Linemen are working 16 hour days, 7 day weeks during major events, and like most of us, make mistakes. Your switches may cost a life. A lesser problem is the generator may cause the power to trip a breaker or blow a fuse somewhere else on the line if your disconnect switches aren't working properly.
Without this disconnect, your power may not be restored during an outage. I've been told they will not work on the line until the switches are upgraded to meet the current standard. Since you have a generator, you might be willing to live with this. But your neighbors may decide to go to court if they suffer damages due to your safety compliance.
Interlocks are typically used in a plant for maintenance purposes. You need to know if they work, and when they need replaced.
On May 7, 6:05 pm, Ignoramus23720 <ignoramus23...@NOSPAM. 23720.invalid> wrote:

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cmiles3 wrote:

Where in the world do you live? Either they pull the meter, or disconnect the drop from the secondaries. I've seen it done repeatedly around here after each hurricane.
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On Fri, 25 May 2007 20:08:58 GMT, "Michael A. Terrell"

I have seen so much bullshit on this thread. POCO guys will just drop out the primary fuse on your transformer, do what they have to do and yank it back in with their hot stick. If something is amiss they will watch the fireworks from a safe distance.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

If you say so, but the out of state crews weren't taking any chances. I had nothing else to do for three weeks while I waited for them to replace the fuse at the entrance to my subdivision, so I watched a lot of the repair work as they replaced thousands of sheared off poles and downed primary and secondary lines.
Popping a fuse back in doesn't help, till the system is repaired, and if a house was badly damaged, they refused to reconnect power till the property was inspected. A lot of red tags on properties and even some poles because a side street had too many problems. Several house had the drops disconnected and coiled up by the meter poles on their property, until the county said it was ok to reconnect them.
Marion county took several bad hits over the last few years, and Progress Energy was to busy co-ordinating repairs to do much of the actual work. There were about five out of state crews working under each local crew, and the goal was to restore power to as many buildings as possible, as soon as possible. Some damaged poles in residential areas were replaced a year after they were damaged, because they only affected a few homes.
My subdivision was built in 1964, and the distribution system is a joke. Fuses blow almost every week, the old wire breaks with a little wind, and it was designed for 60 amp service, not the current 200 amp service that is required for any new installs or upgrades. During the summer when all the central air conditioners are running, and people start cooking supper, we lose power for three streets at about 5 PM every Friday, all summer long. it takes them about four hours to get here with two or three line buckets and inspect for branches touching the wires and downed drops before they replace the fuse.
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On Sat, 26 May 2007 10:26:11 GMT, "Michael A. Terrell"

FPL seems to do a lot better job down here in SW Fla. Maybe it is because we are more exposed to the storms. We had our power back in a day after Wilma and Charlie. (they came right over us). We never lost power in the other dozen or so near misses over the quarter century I have been here. This is also a 60s era neighborhood. My house was built in 1963. Surprisingly it has roof clips that are equal to or exceed the current code set in a poured tie beam.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

We lost over 1000 power poles, and they can only replace so many a day. The Florida green Belt runs right behind my house. When I moved in eight years ago, you couldn't find a gap in the trees. Now 75% or more of the trees are gone Old oaks and pines were snapping like match sticks, but they deflected a lot of wind away from my house. My house is the very last one in the back corner of the subdivision, so anything that causes a problem takes out my electricity.
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That's what I saw in Mississippi many years ago. If the drop to a house was damaged, they disconnected it. Then they would power up the block and most houses would get power back. The few that had damaged service entrances or other problems wouldn't get power back for quite some time (on the order of a couple of weeks, when they finished with the main lines and feeders, they would come back and do individual service).
daestrom
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