interior paint question

I would like to repaint my family room to match the hall. The hall is a very pale (almost white) green. The family room is currently a dark shade of pink, between dusty rose and pepto bismal. The family room paint is semi gloss. The hall is also semi gloss, but went over flat contractor beige. How hard will it be to cover the dark pink, and get the shade the same as the hall? There is a large opening from one to the other, so if they are not a good match, it will be obvious to anyone that we tried to get close but didn't make it. Any tips or special products I'll need?
Melissa
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Melissa wrote:

Good paint + 2 coats.
--
dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Occasionally it can take 2 coats, but if it always does, then you're not really using "good paint". Why buy twice as much cheap paint and spend twice as much time painting?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 19 Jun 2005 15:18:25 GMT, Melissa

Clean, then good quality primer and paint (possibly two coats).
--
Luke
___________________________________________________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There is really no need for primer - a good quality high acrylic paint is your primer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Primer is less expensive than paint and easier to apply.
--
Luke
______________________________________________________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Easier to apply? How can it possibly be easier to apply? And it's not cheaper than free. Buy a good quality paint, put on one coat, and be done with it. There is not often really a need for primer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You don't use primer, or anti-tip brackets, so you wouldn't know, would you?
--
Luke
______________________________________________________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My experience is that pink is hard to cover, especially with a light color. You'll want a good quality paint -- one of the higher lines at Sherwin-Williams or Porter, for instance. Even then it *might* take a third coat.
Obviously, the best way to match the hall paint is take a sample of it to the paint store -- the old can or something with the paint on it. (Actually the best way is to have the formula from the old can.)
Next is to go through the color chips [sometimes a paint store will let you borrow one of their color decks), and even then it'll probably involve buying test quarts to make sure you're getting what you want. I'd start with a color that's close but on the light side -- the paint store can adjust the test quart to zero in on the color, and it's easier to darken a color than to lighten it. Often paint stores will give a bit of a discount on test quarts, so you should ask about that.
If you're intent on matching the color be ready to put your patience to the test. Sometimes it can prove to be nearly impossible. Just a thought -- you may, at some time during the process, want to consider a color that's close to the hall paint. Close can look as good as exact.
oh... and I don't see a need for primer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's virtually impossible, so you have to paint up to an edge (inside or outside corner). There, as long as the paint is pretty close, the way the light plays on it makes it impossible to tell the difference. To see for yourself, go look at any corner in your house. You'll notice the paint on the 2 walls will usually look like 2 different shades if you look closely.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Yeah, I know, and it's more noticeable the more tint a color has. There have been a couple times that I've had to reassure a customer.

You are not going to cover a pink semi-gloss with one coat of white.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What kind of paint do you use?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I use all sorts. It's not a brand specific thing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You can probably cover it in one coat if you use a quality paint such as Sherwin Williams SuperPaint, or similar. Are you sure it's semi-gloss and not eggshell or satin? In any case, you should be fine.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thanks for all the advice. It is definately semi-gloss, as I picked it out myself 4 years ago. The color was right on the sample on the can, but not right in the room. He hired pros to paint last time and they did a terrific job, the color just wasn't what I expected when done, so I've been living with it since, not wanting to eat the expense. The hall has no windows, just the glass in the front door, so as mentioned, the light plays with the colors already, so perhaps that will give me some leeway. Will head to Sherwin Williams with the small can of the hall paint to see if we can get the mix right and will plan on at least 2 coats just to be safe. Thanks again!
Melissa
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's common. I suggest people get a test quart and put a big sample on the wall.
-OR- Get poster board and make a really big color chip. People like this idea because they can make just one big sample and move it to different walls. This has helped a lot - usually people stick with they're color, but there have been plenty of times they adjust it or go to something else. Certainly saves trouble or "living with it" for 4 years.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Jeff:
If you go to most proper paint stores (IE Color Your World, Sherwin, Glidden, etc) the people themselves there will tell you to use a tinted primer. Don't forget also that primer is used for not only colour hiding, but also to promote paint adhesion as well. I used top quality paint in my apartment and painted the bedroom red and DIDN'T use a tinted primer - result, after *5* coats I ALMOST had proper coverage. Moved into a house shortly thereafter, same red, same premium paint, 1 coat of tined primer.......1 coat of paint. done.
I would never skip the primer, for both hiding and adhesion purposes.
Stevie Z
"Of course, that's just my opinion, I could be wrong" Dennis Miller
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

primer.
In my experience they tell you to use a primer for everything.

result, after *5* coats I ALMOST had proper coverage.
That red sounds like an ultra deep base color. Was it? I would definitely use a tinted primer any time an ultra deep base red is used.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Melissa wrote:

You've gotten lots of advice, but....here goes. Primers have two main purposes: isolating stains so they don't bleed through, and adhering new coat to old coat. With semi-gloss, it may be more important to use the right primer (purchased from a real paint store). Coverage will be no different with a primer, except that it counts for about a coat of paint. Dark colors with light over will probably require two, if not three coats of paint. Probably the reason "off white" is so popular; not because it is a pretty color. Even pale over pale require (for me) two coats, and often the contrast is remarkable if they are opposites on color wheel.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

on color wheel. <
Exactly. Even a fresh coat of white over an old coat of white can and probably will take 2 coats.
The only part we differ is the need for primer when painting over semi-gloss walls. I understand the thinking but walls are sufficiently rough enough to cretae adhesion. It's not like trim or other smooth suraces, where there's nothing for the new coat to grab onto. Same goes for urethane - if you don't sand after the 1st coat, the 2nd coat will just chip off. Walls are nothing close to that kind of smooth.
The only catch is oil-base on walls, but thankfully people have pretty much outgrown that.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.