Interesting "transitional" wiring; how to splice?

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On 2/13/2012 4:38 PM, Nate Nagel wrote:

I agree with RBM. And if we want to be picky, wirenuts are not intended to be used over soldered connections.
But wire nut them if you want to.

I don't like them, but I would use self-grounding receptacles, as clare suggests.

If the 2011 NEC is in force, most or all of them should be tamper-resistant (child proof) - 406.12.
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On 02/13/2012 01:26 PM, RBM wrote:

I guess I'm just looking at it from the perspective of if I were the prospective home buyer, ungrounded receps would be a sign that the wiring needed to be upgraded and that would make me make a much lower offer on the place if I were even to do so. In this particular instance the wiring does not need to be replaced, so it's just a matter of replacing the devices and getting rid of the issue entirely; for what it'd cost *my* opinion is it'd be worth it; as to whether it'd be worth it to any particular interested party, who can say?
nate
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Few buyers would even understand the issue. And I doubt a home inspector is going to flag it as if you use self-grounding receptacles they are allowed under code. I've used home inspectors several times and the most they did with receptacles was to stick in one of those quick testers that looks for proper polarity, ground, etc. And they only did THAT on a few receptacles.
Many of these home inspectors can't find obvious defects staring them in the face. If the home inspector does flag it, the response back is to cite the NEC and local electrical inspector if necessary, showing that it meets code.

That's why I wouldn't get too involved in changing stuff that might not need to be changed. I would fix obvious things, like getting rid of those weird receptacles.
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On 2/13/2012 8:02 AM, Nate Nagel wrote: ...

http://www.drillspot.com/products/683485/hubbell_wiring_hbl1281_push_button_ac_switches_standard_switch ...
This house originally had pushbutton switches something like
<http://houseofantiquehardware.com/s.nl/sc.9/category.34/.f
Unfortunately, Dad didn't even keep them afaict when the folks updated the house in the late '70s/early 80s. :(
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http://www.drillspot.com/products/683485/hubbell_wiring_hbl1281_push_button_ac_switches_standard_switch
*If the boxes are metal and are grounded, you can use self-grounding receptacles and switches. That would be a lot easier than opening up old soldered splices.
I'm not sure why you plan to do all of this work. You can always try to sell the house "As is". If you want to get the most money from the sale, talk to a real estate agent or two from the area and they will tell you exactly what to do to increase value and salability.
I have heard that certain lenders such as HUD and FHA have certain requirements before they will extend a loan, but I would wait until you know all of the facts.
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Nate Nagel wrote:

http://www.drillspot.com/products/683485/hubbell_wiring_hbl1281_push_button_ac_switches_standard_switch
If I'm reading your description correctly, the grounds are twisted and soldered together with one of the wires continuing past that splice to be screwed to the metal box. If this is the case I would remove that screwed connection, twist on the new pigtail to the new receptacle and top it off with one of the Ideal pre-fab ground wirenut pigtail assemblies that has a green wire nut with a green wire coming out of the end of the wire nut and terminating to a spade lug terminal which you would screw to the box. I've been using those pigtail assemblies extensively since I found them and really like them.
GFCIs in the kitchen, bathroom, basement and garage as applicable, and those should be easy since you have grounded wiring already.
On those pushbutton switches, I'd be inclined to replace them all with regular toggle or Decora style switches which will look more "up to date" to potential buyers and barely knowledgeable home inspectors. I suspect that the pushbutton switches and plates could fetch a few $ on ebay from someone doing a restoration type project.
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To make the job easier, consider clipping the solder joints, stripping and using Wago push on connectors. They take up far less room in the old boxes, and with 2,4,6,and 8 hole types can accommodate a lot of unusual situations. They should be especially handy for pigtailing the crowded boxes. Could save you a ton of time.
Joe
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