Interesting story about home automobile gasoline filling stations in residential property

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Why drive to the gasoline station? Just stop at one that's on the way or on the way back.
IMO the reason to have that much gasoline on hand is to A) smooth out price spikes. B) to get through some sort of disaster, power outage, etc.
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People buy canned food so they have food that will stay fresh longer, and so they can have a supply on hand just in case the supply of fresh food is interrupted during some sort of weather related or other emergency so they can continue to eat once the few days supply of fresh food they have on hand runs out or can not be properly stored and has to be disposed of...
Grocery stores are very nice concepts, however when they have no electrical power they are unable to sell you any of the foodstuffs they keep locked up inside...
"Stock up on batteries" you mean buying a package of batteries that has 40 AA batteries in it... LOL... By your logic and the way you purchase and store gasoline you would be buying cases of batteries once a year and storing them -- that is not normal...
Normal people do not buy batteries two at a time, but they also do not buy cases or pallets of them to keep a hoard of batteries on hand either...
Normal people have more than one set of clothes because if they do not have more than one set of clothes everyone around them will look at them oddly even if those clothes are washed every night before they are worn the next day...
Normal people do not wear the same exact clothes every day -- this is why when children go through the phase of wanting to do it parents try to discourage them out of it...
The firewood analogy seems to be the closest one to the point you are trying to make -- although in a storm where you would be needing the firewood to heat your house by the fireplace would you want to have to go outside and get wet or cold in order to obtain more fuel? Nope...
Most people keep the woodpile out and away from their house and will bring some additional wood inside when they are warned of some extreme weather or cold coming soon so they don't have to brave the elements to keep warm during the main event...

Wrong, there is something wrong with someone using the authorities to harass and annoy other people... If you feel it was your neighbor, ask the authorities just what format these anonymous complaints were received in: if written letters that is excellent, you have to touch a piece of paper to mail it and there will be fingerprints on it all you need to do is obtain a sample from the suspected neighbor and subpoena the original complaint from the authorities and hire a forensics lab to do the comparison for you; if it was received via the telephone, excellent, all you need to do is subpoena the telephone records of your neighbors which will indicate the calls to each of the inspectors who paid you a visit, unless they were devious enough to procure a pre-paid cell phone to use in this dastardly plot against you, then it becomes something that law enforcement needs to investigate because of the sheer number of subpoenas that are involved to piece things together; if it was an e-mail, those are trickier, but a subpoena to the ISP or owner of the domain name in the e-mail address will result in the name of the user of that account...

Again, there would be a pattern of calls made by one person/telephone to all of those inspectors that would not be random -- especially if the first visit didn't result in what the caller was looking for and they called other additional inspectors from more agencies after that took place...
That sort of thing is using the government to harass and annoy...
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More nonsense. A neighbor sees someone storing large quantities of gasoline near his home. The guy has a 55 gallon drum, a pump and is regularly transporting around 10 five gallon cans of gasoline. He doesn't know exactly what the neighbor is doing, but from what he can see there is reasonable cause for concern. So the neighbor calls code and environmental officials to check it out.
I'd like to see a judge that is going to decide that constitutes harrassment. If the neighbor had a pattern of false accusations, contacting the authorities on various issues that were bogus, then he would have a case for harrassment. But all we have here is a neighbor that is concerned about storing large quantities of gas in a residential neighborhood where it could impact his home. He calls the authorities and says "My neighbor is storing what looks like large quantities of gasoline on his property. He has a 55 gallon drum, he's pumping it, etc. Is that allowed in a residential neighborhood? Can you check it out?" I might have done the same thing. It's all true and doesn't come close to harrassment.
As for getting fingerprints off documents and forensic labs for this kind of nonsense, you've been watching too much TV.

Sure, I can see a judge granting a subpoena for someone's private phone records for a nonsense case like this. Get real.

Oh yeah, I can see the DA getting all over this. Mr. DA, I've been storing large quantities of gas on my property, pumping it, cans etc. Some unknown neighbor called code and environmental officials. That's harrassment! I want you to subpoena my neighbors phone records, cell records, etc. Maybe they should waterboard them too. The DA would throw you out of his office.

So, if I call code enforcement for the town and they say it doesn't violate zoning, then I can't also call the fire marshall to see if there is a fire safety issue? I can't call the EPA to see if there is an environmental restriction that could cover what he is doing?

Only if it's extensive or the allegations are lies. All I see here is a neighbor with a legitimate safety concern who ran the concern through multiple agency that have legitimate involvement with the issue.
As for the OP, as some folks have suggested, he should make his insurance company aware of what he's doing. I'd send them a letter. And even then, how about this. Some vandal decides to use one of his 5 gallon cans to set the whole thing on fire. The resulting fire kills two people living next door and leaves a third disabled for life. Unlike your subpoena for harrassment, that case is real. And how long do you think it would take a jury to decide that the OP was responsible for a whole host of reasons. Everything from maintaining an extreme hazard on his property, to no properly securing it, etc? And when they get a $10 million judgement, then what?
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True as to the normal amount of vehicls and gas but we do it the sensible way and don't waste a bunch of time schlepping cans around.
Harry K
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wrote:

Or buying _industrial use_ fuel at less tax rate than regular gas. Farmers get a huge break that way but it is very expensive to be caught using it for non-farm purposes. That is why the diesel is dyed.
Harry K
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I suspect it's a neighbor who thinks everyone should live the same as everyone else and is using the mechanisms of the government to harass the OP into conforming.

I doubt it. The OP would likely know exactly what he had done to anger a neighbor if he did anything that crossed over the (property) line.
If it's being used for a business... so what? If he's not making noise or emmitting noxious fumes/oders what difference does it make?
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clipped

Calling code enforcement is a good way to start a neighbor war...gotta be careful where it goes. I called code once when condo neighbors all had gasoline cans sitting outside their doors for boats...some never used their boats, so the gas was probably years old. We had already had minor thefts and vandalism, so didn't want the vandal critters to be inspired by having gasoline at hand. One neighbor was gone a lot, so his son took one of his gas cans and put it inside the condo! The FD enforced .. very nicely .. using the right kind of can, away from the structure. The gas cans were stored outside front doors after I called code enf. to get rid of recycling bins (full of trash) outside front doors. The recycling bins, prior to my arrival at the condo, replaced open trash cans that were the dining area for rats. They changed from open trash cans to (free) dumpster, which helped. Another neighbor had called code enf. about attic rats - there had been very heavy infestation - and the code guy found only "dust balls in the AC duct"; had he checked the attic, he's have found lots of rat sign. After one elderly neighbor passed away, I helped organize the estate sale in his condo unit..great big rat trap on his closet shelf. These are not poor folks we're talking about...
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On Sat, 03 Dec 2011 07:32:03 -0500, Norminn wrote:

I understand. Out here, everyone does 'something' against code.
For example, you're not supposed to grade more than a certain number of cubic yards of soil - but of course, nobody can even see you with a bulldozer, so people grade all the time.
Every once in a while a neighbor complains and they put a stop to it and stop them from touching the land for a certain number of years.
Likewise with cutting trees. Every single tree over a given diameter is a protected tree. You're supposed to apply for a permit to cut, even diseased or fallen trees (although the permit will be granted for sure for those).
If a neighbor complains, the inspector will come out and cite you for cutting down your own tree!
Similarly, there are quite a few 'unapproved auxiliary buildings' out here that have electricity or which are greater than 120 square feet. These buildings just go up without anyone but your one or two neighbors noticing the hammering and sawing noises. Since it's a scenic zoned area, you have to be away from the road by quite a distance (I don't remember how many hundreds of feet but someone once told me what it was and I was shocked at how far from the road it must be to be legal.)
Most of these well-lit too-close-to-the-road illegal sheds are completely ignored - but if someone calls the inspector out on you, you have to take it down.
There's even a guy whose pool layed unfinished for five years which I was told by a neighbor was because he tried to build it without getting it inspected.
Even the lines to 'my' built-in gas-fired barbeque I was told wasn't to code when the propane guy first inspected the house to fill up my new 1,000 gallon tank that I added after putting in a concrete pad. Apparently the previous owner put in a rather large pool shower & equipment room and barbeque pad without getting permitted and nobody complained yet. :)

Wow. I didn't know rats were a code violation. I have those big rat traps all over the basement! I get a rat a week on average and keep a jar of peanut butter in the garage just to bait the traps.
We do have vector control guys out here. There are three types.
One does mosquitoes. One does rodents & snakes. The third does bigger stuff like the mountain lions and deer and coyotes.
When the neighbor was foreclosed on, he put mosquitoe fish in their green pool and koi pond to eat the buggers and put up a big sign "DO NOT REMOVE THESE FISH" right next to the pool - so either the vector control helicoptor noticed the green pool or someone must have asked them to look at the pool.
As for the rodent inspector, I guess he would be the one to suggest there are rats, but, there are quite a few mice, moles or groundhogs (I never can tell which they are), rabbits, and rats out here that I wonder what you can possibly do that's illegal to attract them. Our garbage goes out weekly in three very large bins - blue for recycling, green for landscaping, & gray for trash (which is almost always empty as I can't imagine what goes in that bin other than food-soiled items not worth cleaning for reclying and not worth putting in the compost pile).
Likewise for the mountain lion guy. There's not really much he can do except tell you to fence your lifestock with a tall fence that has an overhang to protect the top. But I don't have livestock so I don't know what reason someone would call code enforcement on me for that. Out here, you can't shoot a mountain lion unless it's threatening you or your property anyway. We actually see them probably once every few years but we hear about them in the news about once every few months overall.
So, I guess I'm wholeheartedly agreeing with you.
We live in glass houses. There must be a code violation or two on almost every property out here, especially since I don't even KNOW all the codes (for example, I can't imagine what rat codes I might be violating just by setting the numerous traps).
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On 12/3/2011 10:10 AM, worker bee wrote:

We had seawall repairs done at our condo..about $35k?..and shortly later the newer condo next door had a major pipe burst which flowed onto our property and eroded a lot of soil from behind the seawall. I enjoyed nagging the city from time to time because some of the city building dept. were real a--holes. I sent off an email to the bld. dept, asking whether the city had signed off on the grading of the neighbor's lot during construction. The neighbor had a huge paved lot and all of their downspouts emptied onto that...curb around their lot had a channel that let all that water go onto our property, which was a huge amount during summer t-storms. I'd paid attention to what was going on, and had researched a number of serious problems re: our condo. When the city got my email, and nice engineer and a student intern came out; engineer was impressed with what I knew and understood about the problems. Shortly later, the neighbor had some minor adjustments done, including a culvert that dumped their water into the channel, rather than onto our property. Didn't stop the neighbors in that condo from letting their dogs poop in our yard...I have been really impressed by the gall some people show by walking their dog into our property to poop; strangers with no axe to grind :o)

That was a fairly serious issue in FL, with all the foreclosures and whatever nasty disease the mosquitoes were spreading at the time.

In FL, rats are about like termites...don't wonder IF you'll have them, only WHEN. It is basic practice to keep trees away from structures. Rats chew up wiring, holes in structure, etc.. Elderly folks should not be forced to live with rats because they have rats for neighbors :o)

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wrote:

That can be fixed with some attention and a shovel. Take it back to the neighbor and place it on the front step.
As for the strangers, pick it up in the shovel and catch up to them and offer it back to them. They will surely appreciate it.
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Hi, My house is beside community mail box. People come to pick up their mail from their keyed boxes. Some used to toss cig. butt onto our lawn. I got upset and started to pick up the butt and give it back to the person who threw it away burning. After a while they quit doing that. Any how I think the OP is very unusual playing with gasoline like that. Or is it FUNNY? Maybe accident waiting to happen. I hope he does not get burned or his house does not go up in smoke sooner or later.
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On 12/3/2011 1:03 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

It was tempting :o) In that particular condo, one could get into enough trouble being nice, so didn't want to push my luck. Condo board, for several years, were very, very hostile to those who wanted the place properly maintained....it wasn't about picking a color of paint or any other minor issue. Eventually, enough units were sold (after the real estate crash) that the bad actors were no longer in power.
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worker bee wrote:

You should ignore the insults and irritations or respond with a scorched earth policy.
If you reply to your neighbor's affronts with piddly responses, like sending him a fire engine at 3:00 a.m., this tit-for-tat business will go on for decades, causing continuing fluxations and causing you (and him) to nearly itch to death.
Now by "scorched earth" I mean doing something, probably illegal, but that has a consequence orders of magnitudes greater than a mere inconvenience.
* Find about three of your like-minded neighbors. Visit your neighbor and beat the shit out of him. I mean sufficient to put him, if not in the hospital, at least in the emergency room.
* In the dark of the moon, plant some Marijuana shrubs in an out of the way place on his property. Wait a week. Call the fuzz.
Consult the book: "Make My Day." Get it here: (Amazon.com product link shortened)22915184&sr=1-1
I particularily liked the episode where a chap, after getting screwed by an attorney, impersonated the attorney in talks with both the telephone company and a local cemetery. He persuaded both that he was in desperate fear of being buried alive and wanted a telephone in his casket and that he was willing to pay any amount.
Negotiations continued for several weeks, but finally both the telephone company and the cemetery found ways, at no small expense, to accommodate his request.
He then took out an "ad" in a local suburban newspaper, disguised as an obituary, of the target attorney. The legal-specialty newspaper in his community picked it up and republished the faux death notice.
By this time, both the cemetery and the telephone company were pestering the object attorney with demands that he come right down and sign some papers.
Then it got worse for the lawyer.
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I suggest you just let this thing cool off, and dont do anything that will make it worse... "Getting even" can get you into severe trouble with the law if you are not careful.
Just my 2 cents
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On Sat, 03 Dec 2011 07:49:35 -0600, hls wrote:

I do understand what you mean by cooling off.
In the beginning, you want to call the septic police on them (if such a thing exists); then you cool off.
It's like when the obnoxious cops give you a ticket, and then try to give you a lesson at the same time (meanwhile, they speed around like it's nobody's business all the time, breaking the law left and right - and they don't ever get called on the carpet until/unless they accidentally kill someone - and even then - they put the kitchen knife in their hands).
Not one can be trusted, unfortunately. But that's a whole nother story.
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On Sat, 03 Dec 2011 06:33:32 -0600, HeyBub wrote:

I agree.
BTW, out here, they send the ENTIRE fire department on EVERY call! I'm amazed they have all this money - but it's in their contract. No matter what the call, EVERYONE must go, trucks and all!

Interestingly, there are legal pot farms out here.
The fence them in and put up identification at the entrance but you can see them easily if you want and get in at night if you so desire.
I'm surprised all the high school kids don't crash them but I guess there is enough legal pot around here that the kids don't need do that.
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Here's an interesting story about a guy siphoning gas from his boat when a static spark ignited the fumes.
http://www.caller.com/news/2011/nov/12/man-burns-while-working-on-motor-boat /
You're certainly free to do what you want but I'll fuel my car at the gas station.
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On Sat, 03 Dec 2011 11:17:03 -0500, Smokey Burns wrote:

Your login of 'smoky burns' is apropos! :)
I agree that the biggest danger is fire, either from the fueling itself or from wildlands catching on fire and then the gas can burning.
And, the biggest danger are the fumes catching fire. The story doesn't say it was a 'static spark' so we really don't know WHAT caused the vapors or fuel to ignite. I find it hard to believe there was enough static charge built up 'just' from siphoning - what? Maybe twenty gallons? (How much does a boat hold?).
But, the boat might not have been grounded. Maybe it was up on blocks? It doesn't say. So maybe without that grounding, enough static electricity built up from the fuel going down the rubber hose - but most of us would at least put the containers being filled on the ground if the boat wasn't grounded.
Let's hope he wasn't smoking cigarettes, or that he didn't turn on some other more likely ignition source.
How many incidents like these are there daily in the USA? I'd bet one a day is likely (just guessing). But still, I'm more likely to die from a flu or a car accident, each of which kills something like 30 thousand people a year so we should put it all into perspective.
Does anyone know the number of people killed a year in refueling accidents?
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On Sat, 3 Dec 2011 16:57:40 +0000 (UTC), worker bee

Don't know the numbers, but thedanger is VERY REAL and a significant static charge can build up in a hose transfering only a few gallons of fuel under the "wrong" conditions. You want the tank being filled and the tank you are filling from (and the nozzle) at the same potential - which is why ALL fuel dispensers use metallic nozzles and metal braided rubber hoses - and ALL vehicles have metal (or at least conductive) fillers, which are grounded to the body. Most plastic fuel tanks on equipment are also "conductive" plastic.
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Most guys siphon from the car to the boat -- gas is usually cheaper on land. I've heard of folks fuel up the boat on land, before launching at the slip. Something is odd, here.
I fuel the vehicles at the gas station, cause I live in a trailer park, and I'm sure the park would not like fuel storage.

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