Interesting story about home automobile gasoline filling stations in residential property

Page 6 of 10  
jeff_wisnia wrote:

Quite a change when the wife rolls over, exhausted, and goes to sleep.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
bugalugs wrote:

Yea, I think that's what we're all trying to figure out at this point.
His neighbor was looking for a reason to call the authorities on him, and didn't have to look far.
There's only 2 reasons why someone might want to maintain a small store of gas in his backyard:
1) It's a long way to the gas station, and you're going to burn a lot of gas going there just to get your gas. So get as much as you can in one trip and bring it all home for re-distribution.
2) You want to save a few bucks by buying gas when the price is low. It's just that you want to buy a LOT of gas when the price is low - enough to last you a month.
I can't see either reason as being lucrative enough to justify the hassle and the up-front cost in the tanks and pump. The additional risk of having a large gas tank on your property is hard to quantify - and just remember that it becomes more dangerous from an explosion pov the more empty it gets.
Oh - your home insurance company might not like seeing this tank on your property - you might want to check your insurance contract to see if there's a limit as to how much gas they'll let you store before they void the contract. If your neighbor was creative enough, he might try to figure out who your property is insured with and give them an anonymous call...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I can think of another reason. How about he's not buying the gas at a gas station but stealing it from some jobsite?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Bingo!
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
-snip-

I think you may have just nailed it. That is the only way it would make any sense at all.
He's either nuts or a thief. [not to say he can't be a nutty thief, or a thieving nut]
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

How about: 3) He has a lot of off road vehicles to fuel up. ATV, snowmobile, tractor, etc.
As for filling up the family sedan, I hate pumping gas once so I'll be damned if I'm going to do it twice. We do have a few full service station in central MA though, lowest prices around too!
Here in CT it is 3.53 if I pump it myself. Across the border, I can have it pumped for me and pay 3.31.
OK, that brings up reason 4). He buys a large quantity when traveling to another state with cheaper gas and saves $25 a load.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Transporting fuel of any quantity not contained in your vehicle's factory designed fuel tank across state lines requires a federal license to do so -- case else you are committing tax fraud on the state of your residence by evading the gasoline tax on fuel you clearly intend to use within your state that you purchased in another and making a federal offense out of it by crossing a state line...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 3 Dec 2011 11:00:09 -0800 (PST), Evan

Info on transporting. http://telsafe.org/Documents/NTSPGas-DieselFuelTransportation.pdf
I found nothing about federal laws and taxes though. I don't think they give a damn about not paying the state tax. When I ran trucks, I had to track the miles in each state for fuel use, never in a car. Feds did not care what we did.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What do guys like landscapers that have several cans of gas on their trucks do when they cross a state line everyday? Dump it all out? Geez...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/4/2011 11:17 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Likely Doug the landscapers incursions into another state is statistical noise. But there are reporting requirements even if you transport fuel in the vehicles fuel tank in commercial use.
The organization that handles it is IFTA:
Our former governor was a big proponent of handing all of the Interstates over to the massively bureaucratic overfilled with political appointments turnpike commission. He constantly made the false claim that out of state trucks were not paying road use tax. If you are even a small trucking company you must file an IFTA return that lists all of the states you operated in and the mileage and remit the tax. So say you filled up a truck in NY and drove across NJ, PA and OH. Even though you didn't purchase fuel there you would need to pay road use tax to NJ, PA and OH (and get a credit for fuel you didn't use in NY)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
3) your town does power cuts, and you are tired of having to drive to east no where to find a station with power, and then sit for an hour to get your turn at the pump. 3a) for the gas to get to work 3b) for the gas to run your generator 4) you're in hurricane country, and want to be able to evacuate, without the hour long wait for gasoline at the station. 5) you have a big back yard, and it takes more than a tank of gas to mow the lawn 6) you're mistrustful of the JIT system, and want your own reserve of fuel
Christopher A. Young Read the Book of Mormon!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 03 Dec 2011 09:30:36 -0500, Home Guy wrote:

There are a lot of good reasons not to transport & then store gasoline at home for sure.
Valid reasons NOT to transport & store gasoline in legal amounts: * Dangerous (for all) * Tedious (for some) * Cost savings are probably around zero over time (multiple things considered)
Some potential reasons to transport & store gasoline in legal amounts: * The wife loves not having to fill up (& hates anyone touching her car) * It's convenient for me also (I don't mind what others invariablly seem to consider too much effort) * The additional danger 'can' be managed
:)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sounds to me like you are ALREADY getting back at your neighbor, with all that fussing over gasoline going on next door to him.
--
Often wrong, never in doubt.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 02 Dec 2011 19:10:12 -0800, bob haller wrote:

Actually, as far as I can tell, gasoline doesn't spoil all 'that' fast.
I use up the entire 55 gallon drum in just a few weeks, depending on my driving of course. It generally takes less than two months to use it all up.
Even California blended corn-o-haul easily lasts two months from what I've seen in the literature. HOWEVER (and this is a big but) ... EVERYONE says gas doesn't last long but NOBODY actually has a length of time specified that anyone else will agree to.
Hearing people say gas doesn't last is about as useful as hearing people say life isn't what it used to be. It's meaningless the way it's used.
NOBODY but nobody can tell me how LONG gasoline REALLY lasts but EVERYONE I talk to says two months is just fine. I even called Chevron and they said there is no problem using their reformulated California gas months after it was dispensed. They said WATER is the main culprit in gasoline going bad - and they said that as long as you keep water out of the tank, it should easily last the time I'm using it. They said heat also matters, but, at outside temperatures, it doesn't matter as much as water does.
So, if anyone can find an actual TIME that others will agree to that gasoline lasts in outside storage - I'd be the first one to listen to them - but two months seems, by all accounts, to be well within the agreed-upon stable storage period.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/3/2011 3:29 AM, worker bee wrote:

I might understand if you were buying when prices are low and using it when prices are high. The whole thing sounds like way too much of a hassle, more of a hassle than taking the car to the gas station.
Speaking of buying low, I paid $2.99/gallon earlier this week.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My only method of beating the system is to keep all tanks full as prices are rising and as near empty as practical when they are dropping = dollar cost averaging.
I could beat the system somewhat if I could haul a decent size tank across the state line. Big difference in fuel taxes over there.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 03 Dec 2011 08:33:07 -0800, Harry K wrote:

I'm in California so the state lines are hundreds of miles away - but I could see this system working if you lived in, say, New York or Pennsylvania, and all you had to do was cross state lines to get cheap gas.
I suspect the toll bridges might have special regulations though but there are plenty of non-bridge crossings which could save you a ton.
When we were kids, we used to do that with liquor, taking advantages of the differences in state laws. (Uuugh, don't remind me of those days!) :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Transporting more than a few bottles of liquor across state lines which can only be used as gifts is utterly illegal... Alcohol and tobacco products are required to have state tax stamps on them which prove that they were lawfully obtained and had the taxes paid on them... States require that you have a proper license and permit to be able to sell either of those items...
Transporting either of those commodities across a state line in quantities of more than a gallon of hard liquor is a serious federal offense...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 3 Dec 2011 11:04:36 -0800 (PST), Evan

This is all true.

I think this is BS. Fed taxes have been paid. They don't care much. The other state may though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 03 Dec 2011 10:00:41 -0500, Tony Miklos wrote:

I actually did the opposite recently when the prices were hovering around $4.30 a gallon.
At those prices, I stopped refilling the gas cans and just refilled the cars as the prices steadily dropped.
When they got down to about $3.90, I started filling the gas cans again.
With my 1,500 gallons of propane, I can easily fill up in August (typically the low of the year) which lasts me through most of the winter at least. So I know what you mean about buying in volume to take advantage of the cheaper prices.
If 'our' California special gasoline ever got anywhere near 3 bucks a gallon, I'd run out and buy a hundred five gallon cans! :)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.