Insulating over existing cellulose or whatever I got

Hi all. I've read through countless posts on this topic but haven't yet come to a worthwhile conclusion. Here's my scenario:
I live in central Maine - where it gets pretty cold. My attic has around 3-6" of blown-in insulation - without a vapor barrier. I'd like to improve my situation by adding new insulation.
Can I use fiberglass batts (without vapor barrier) on top of the blown-in insulation without making things worse?
Should I use fiberglass batts over the blown-in insulation?
Should I add more blown-in insulation over what I have?
Should I remove the blown-in insulation all together and install new fiberglass batts with a vapor barrier?
I've got serious ice-dams that build up in the winter and I know it's because of the limited insulation I have in my attic.
Thanks!
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You are way under insulated for maine. I would collect the blown in stuff and use it but make the depth at least 12 inches deep. where you removed the blown in stuff, put in paper backed insulation between the joists Then add a layer without paper cross wise to those layers...I did that with my house and that gives me 1 foot of batt insulation, I forgot the R value I ended up with...
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Given that ice dams are caused by the snow melting over the heated area, then refreezing over the eave area, it is vital to keep the area ventilated to allow the underside of the roof to stay cold. So in addition to more insulation to keep your heat in, be sure you have adequate ventilation so whatever heat does get through escapes. Around our area, ridge vents are recommended, but I always wonder how effective they can be when snow piles up on them. The snow does melt there first so it looks like the heat is escaping when it can. But this is not Maine so you probably have a different set of problems for venting.
pjoMofo wrote:

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I'd say the proper way would be to remove the blown in (only because it has no vapor barrier), and roll out kraft faced batts between the joists. Then roll unfaced perpendicular to the joists. I'd go to at least R-49 (you can find out recommendations for your area on the web; I don't care to take the time; around MD, R-49 is recommended by some agency or another (though less is required by code), so I wouldn't go any less. Attic insulation is way more important than wall so go as high as you can.
Oh, you can resue the loose stuff in some fashion also, though it may be a pain to mix it with the other stuff. I'd use it as additional to what I've described rather than instead of.
Renata
On 14 Aug 2003 12:09:30 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@silkroadtech.com (pjoMofo) wrote:

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