Insulating heating pipes

Hi,
I have just purchased a house with low pressure steam radiators and an oil furnace. The pipes in the basement that feed the radiators were insulated with asbestos, which we had professionally removed over the summer.
The previous owners had installed insulation in the ceiling of the basement. Now as you can imagine, with un-insulated steam pipes radiating heat and the insulated ceiling holding it in, our unfinished basement is always rather toasty, which I am sure is an in-efficient way to be heating our house.
Eventually, I plan on insulating the pipes and removing the ceiling insulation, but which one will have a bigger positive impact on my heating bill?
Thanks
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Spider Rico wrote:

I can't think of any common reason to insulate the basement ceiling. Likewise I can't think of any reason to remove it.
Insulation the pipes should save some energy, but maybe not as much as you think. Most, but not all of the energy coming from the popes ends up in your home. However I would insulate.

--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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On Sat, 13 Nov 2004 14:18:32 GMT, "Joseph Meehan"

Even the one that got poisoned?
Jerry
-- snipped-for-privacy@cryogenic.net snipped-for-privacy@pobox.com
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Should have left it. In place, it is harmless. Oh well, too late now.

Heat does rise you you will be getting some of the benefits along the way. Not a total waste, but still some waste trhough the basement walls..

Maybe neither. If you insulate the pipes, the steam will carry further before it condenses but the heat is still moving from the basement to the upstairs.
For some reason, basement ceilings are now insulated. It may be some regulation about heated living spaces that I'm not aware of. If nothing else, insulating the pipes will give you more control over where the heat energy goes. Plumbing supply houses carry a fiberglass type insulation made just for pipes. Goes on easily in sections and has a tape to keep it in place.
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On 13 Nov 2004 06:00:13 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@wilkinsautomation.com (Spider Rico) wrote:

Insulate the pipes. Leave the ceiling insulation right where it is.
Gary R. Lloyd
http://www.techmethod.com
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I would also insulate the pipes and leave the ceiling insulation alone.
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