Insulating garage walls


Is there anything to consider when insulating the walls of the garage? The sources that I've seen seem to treat it like any other room of the house, and I suppose it is really, but I'm considering potential pitfalls like gas lines, shared walls with the interior of the house, insect infestation and the like.
Just because the wall you're insulating is shared by the interior of the house, doesn't mean you need to treat it differently right? Does the paper that hangs the insulation need to face the interior wall or does it not really matter at all? Not all insulation has that paper, so it shouldn't matter.
Does it need to be kept away from gas lines and high energy sources like 40 A circuits? What about where it butts up against the fireplace? Nothing I've read suggests that precautions need to be taken, but before going out and buying the stuff I figure I'd better ask.
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Eigenvector wrote:

On exterior walls, you probably want to add vapour barrier on the warm side of the insulation. Assuming you're in a cold location, if you really want to do it properly you can also add vapour barrier boxes around your electrical boxes, and then seal where the wires go through the boxes and seal the boxes to the vapour barrier itself.

The wall shared with the house should already be insulated, otherwise the house would be losing a lot of energy through that wall. If you want to put additional insulation on that wall, make sure you don't have any kind of vapour barrier.

No.
That one I can't answer.
Chris
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Okay, I at least know that I'll be tackling the problem from the right side of the wall. Actually none of the walls in my house are insulated, I'm starting with the garage since a leaky chimney seal damaged most of it years ago.

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The paper on insulation also works as a vapor barrier so should go toward the inside,otherwise it could trap moisture between it and the siding..Any area where fire is a concern remove the paper from the batt and friction fit it..Insects are tough to stop anyway so if You want to heat the garage then You have to take the chance..If I have to insulate I like the formeldahyde free stuff,,lots less itchy! Dean
Eigenvector wrote:

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On Mon, 15 Jan 2007 21:02:36 -0800, "Eigenvector"

imho:
I was told the moisture barrier should be on the warm side (during the winter). So guessing facing your living space unless you live very far south.
tom @ www.FreelancingProjects.com
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wrote:

I'd never guessed that the paper attached to fiberglass insulation is a vapor barrier - but after reading a bit, it is. And yes it should go on the WARM side of the wall. That means I'll have to install non-backed fiberglass insulation since I don't want to rip out the drywall on the interior unless I have to. I don't see any evidence of moisture problems in this house after 40 years, so a moisture barrier isn't a top concern (mainly because the house is so open moisture can't accumulate). :)
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