Insulating a basement floor...

Can anyone direct me to website for information about insulating my basement floor. I'm presently considering on installing a floating floor in thre basement, but would like to know the best way to do the sub floor.
Paul
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Paul wrote:

basement
Normally you don't need to insulate a basement floor. You have 6+ feet of dirt for insulation and it works well.
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Joseph E. Meehan

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I used foamboard, but gypsum , pearlite , come to mind
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Up here in Canada you definitely need to if you are planning on using ceramic tile in your basement. I've been in houses that have basements with ceramic tile in the hallways and carpet in the bedrooms. In the winter time the ceramic tile is freezing cold even though the room is at a comfortable temperature. Unfinished areas (such as the concrete floor in the furnace room) are just as cold. Areas with carpet however are fine on your feet.
I've heard that the proper way to do it if you are planning on having ceramic tile in a basement where it can get quite cold in the winter is to install wires underneath the tile in a zig-zag pattern that heat up the floor when you turn on a switch. However I can't imagine that being cheap on electricity.
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On 26-Aug-2004, jonny snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Jonny R) wrote:

Insulating the basement makes sense unless you think that 12-15C is comfortable. While soil does insulate, the temperature at depth is quite a bit cooler than room temperature. If you want to heat the soil, don't insulate. Eventually enough heat will end up in the soil to stabilize the temp at a nice temperature. However, if the water table is inconveniently located, that might not happen.
It doesn't take much insulation to make a difference in the basement. If I were to do it, I'd use something like DriCore with an inch or so of insulation on top then the subfloor. Dry and comfortable - a bit pricey, perhaps, but not outrageous.
Mike
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Up here in Canada, you almost always have to insulate a basement floor somewhat if you plan on using it as living space. _Unless_ they already put in foam board under the concrete.
If you were doing the floor in hardwood, the hardwood _might_ be enough.
For carpet, choosing a thick underpad is often enough.
If you're putting in a floating subfloor, I'd consider putting in foam between the sleepers. Like Styrofoam-SM Blue. [Check the application booklets for exactly which one is appropriate.]
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Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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I bought Delta FL for our basement www.deltafl.com It is essentially the bottom portion of what is on the Dri-Core product, and much less expensive. You can put laminate flooring directly on the Delta-Fl without the need of plywood under it. Nice stuff in my opinion.
I bought mine from a distributor in Tennessee (Berry's Wood Products). They were very friendly, answered all questions I had, and shipped it to me here in PA Fed-Ex. For 3 rools (306 sq. ft. per roll or something like that) was $565. Not bad, and if you get a small amount of water under it, the dimples on the product help it disperse without harm (although it will not prevent heavy water damage). Check out the website if you are interested.
Chris

basement
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wrote:

R-foil (bubble foil bubble) is designed to do just this. Need to seal the concrete floor, then a layer of R-foil, then lay the floor. Google R-foil or radiant heat barrier.
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