Insulate Garage without Drywall?

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Bob wrote:

The hardest part of putting up drywall is moving the sheet. So you screw up a sheet, you lost $5, or more likely you will be able to use at least half of that sheet elsewhere. Building codes require a specific thickness between the house and the garage. Doubt if any have requirements for an outside wall of an attached garage.
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Thats what I did in our garage in the Vancouver area. Stayed that way one Winter, then I decided that for the minimal cost of sheetrock, I might as well finish the job. Once the rock was up, I added a work bench and several storage cabinets against the wall.
R
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I live in Ottawa, and have a detached oversized double garage. It gets pretty cold here.
The walls and ceiling were fiberglass and vapor barrier, no drywall.
It stayed this way for almost 20 years, half of which was when we owned it.
We don't park cars in it (much), it's mostly a work shop (it's heated when I need it). While condensation was occasionally a problem, it went away completely when when we had a floor poured (it was originally bare gravel) and made sure that the attic ventilation worked.
Despite what others have suggested, the vapor barrier never got damaged. Until...
About five years ago, I finally got around to drywalling the walls. I started with the idea of just taping it, but despite "it's just a garage", it ended up being completely done. By the time I was finished, I was pretty good at it. Ceilings were still vapour barrier and fiberglass.
Now the "until": 20+ years of exposure to sunlight coming through the windows embrittled the vapour barrier on the ceiling to the point that one very cold night about 40 square feet of it "shattered" into strips...
Managed to patch it (had to drop ceiling lathe to do it), and covered that area with drywall. Still need to do the rest of the ceiling.
Drywalling is easy. There's no real reason not to do it. But I have an awful amount of stuff to move before I can finished the ceiling (and the bathroom has been demolished and is higher priority...)
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It\'s not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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On Sun, 23 Oct 2005 04:25:35 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@nortelnetworks.com (Chris Lewis) wrote:

Good God. You're lucky you were not killed. I just can not see how anyone could survive 40 square feet of visqueen falling on them . Just be thankful you did not put duct tape up there too. That surely would have added enough weight to crush an elephant. Of course only Republicans keep elephants in their garage and since I dont know what political party you belong, this statement may not pertain :^)
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Snicker ;-)
I was more worried about the unfaced fiberglass batts clobbering my cranium ;-)
But they didn't fall.
Actually, it did have a real consequence. Since the vapor barrier was no longer functioning and slightly warmer air rising through the fiberglass hitting the roof sheathing (especially when the heaters were on of course), I had severe ice dams on that section of the eaves and the very beginnings of water staining (precursor to rot) of the roof structure.
Once I realized that, replacing the barrier and protecting it against any more UV deterioration became a rather high priority.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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