insulate doorknob

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Has anyone ever insulated a doorknob to keep the cold air out? I was thinking about removing it, filling the hole with foam then cut holes for the screws and latch. Wondering what other's opinions are.
Thanks,
Carl
http://www.gaihosa.com
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The steel rotating part will still conduct cold from one side to another. We can reduce the apparent coldness of the interior door handle by fitting a wood bezel and handle in place of metal ones.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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On Nov 22, 10:07 pm, snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

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No wonder gmail has a bad rep.
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you're the first person to say anything negative about it. What's wrong with you????
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Rabies.
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On 11/22/2008 7:04 AM snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com spake thus:

Since you appear to be truly ignorant of why gmail has such a bad rep, it's for a couple of reasons: tons of clueless new posters to Usenet newsgroups such as this one, but worse, goddamn spammers of said newsgroups who use gmail addresses with impunity.
Not saying you're a member of either group, just pointing out why so many of us hate gmail.
--
Washing one\'s hands of the conflict between the powerful and the
powerless means to side with the powerful, not to be neutral.
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And on a fair balance, I've seen some good people in this and other NGs that use gmail.
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wrote:

Yes, I've done it and it works very well. I also did the same thing to the deadbolts.
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wrote:

Think storm door.
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On Nov 22, 9:31 am, snipped-for-privacy@columbus.rr.com wrote:

Thanks but where I live a storm doesn't but it!
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On Nov 22, 9:31 am, snipped-for-privacy@columbus.rr.com wrote:

Sorry but where I live a storm door doesn't cut it. Spray foam or something to seal the hole has to be done. I like the wood bezel idea also. Considering that Don is from Ottawa should make it suitable solution.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

How is the "cold air" coming in?
Is it leaking out around the knob shank? There can't be a very large gap there. maybe just an O-ring over the shank pushed against the hole it comes through would stop most of the air flow. You could use a little superglue to keep the O-ring in place.
Methinks you're straining at a gnat in terms of the amount of cold air coming in there, relative to all the other air leaks in the average house. but have fun....
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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wrote:

"Metinks" you took the bait.
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Ron wrote:

Well, perhaps I did take it hook, line and sinker, but maybe I didn't.
The OP did say "cold air", not a "cold knob". And people do take cold air leaks emanating from things like electrical outlet and swith boxes seriously enough to try and smother them out, so why not want to extinguish a leak from around a doorknob shank or bezel plate also?
Perhaps the OP will let us know if he was asking a serious question, which elicited a lot of smartypants replies from other students in this high school cafeteria of a thread, or just pulling our chains.
Speaking of pulling chains, I had some fun with a Nigerian scammer a few years ago. Apologies if I posted this link here before, the years are taking their toll on my memory and lately I've been suffering from some serious CRS.*
http://home.comcast.net/~jwisnia18/jeff/scambusting.html
Jeff
* CRS = "Can't remember shite."    
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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wrote:

I didn't mean that there was actually a stream of cold air (which there isn't) just the knob itself is freezing cold probably because it is made of steel. I figured filling the gap with spray foam or replacing the bezel with a wooden one would solve the problem.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Can your wife knit a "knob cozy?"
I think that would be endearing and add a unique flavor to your home.
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wrote:

I didn't mean that there was actually a stream of cold air (which there isn't) just the knob itself is freezing cold probably because it is made of steel. I figured filling the gap with spray foam or replacing the bezel with a wooden one would solve the problem.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote in

If you disassemble the lockset, you'll find that the metal outside knob is fastened to the metal inside knob with metal screws. The locking mechanism also connects to both knobs, just not as solidly.
To stop heat from flowing from the warm side to the cool side, you'll have to have a "thermal break" between the two sides--some non-metal material to which both sides attach.
This non-metal thermal break is not available as far as I know, and I bet it never will be. It would be a weak point in the lock, and you want a lock to be as strong as possible.
The heat transfer will be small in any case.
If you're interested in saving heating/cooling money, you'll be better off looking for something else to improve. If you want to avoid touching a cold doorknob, get somebody's grandmother to knit a doorknob cozy.
Hint: Don't waste your time saving money on your doorbell. ;-)
--
Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
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wrote:

I feel like this posting can be useless. All I want to know is if someone has ever insulated a door knob. That is it. Not if you like knitting knobs, not if you are confused if this is a really post or not, not your personal opinions on gmail, not anything but what is in the original post. If the original post is not clear then ask for clarification or don't post at all. Ron and Don had the only good posts and I would like to thank them both very much for making this particular thread worth while. I think the rest of you seriously need to get a life!
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