Instant Cooling to 35deg.F

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I don't know where this guy lives that he can't buy cold beer. That would suck. Here's a good drinking game. Take a drive around any WV town and drink every time you see a sign that says "Cold Beer" (usually hand painted). Just keep it low when the cops go by. Anyway, even room temp beer will get ice cold in a couple of hours. Use more ice.
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wrote:

clothing even in the heat of summer, but the important part is all the beer is always cold in the store.
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You need ice and water for the instant beer cooler. That makes a lot of sense....
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On Wed, 29 Aug 2007 10:41:37 -0500, dpb wrote:

Pitch camp next to a glacier fed stream. Put beer in stream and then set up camp. When done, the beer will be cold and you'll probably be ready for one.
Choice two would be to bring a mate who's frigid.
The world's falling apart the likes of Bush in office and you are worried about a cold beer... I'm happy your priorities are in place.
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franz frippl wrote:

Or a friend who's really cool.
--
If you really believe carbon dioxide causes global warming,
you should stop exhaling.
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Yup. A troll. Anyway Mythbusters on TV did the experiments. Discharging a CO2 fire extinguisher on the can will do a decent job cooling the beer. The wisdom of carrying around a CO2 thingy for this purpose will probably be something George will think a pretty good idea.
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on 8/29/2007 10:00 PM PaPaPeng said the following:

The best was ice-water-salt, which cooled a 6 pack to 38 F in 5 minutes. http://kwc.org/mythbusters/2005/03/mythbusters_cooling_a_sixpack.html
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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On Wed, 29 Aug 2007 10:37:54 -0500, georgetews3 wrote:

Two hours on ice is more than enough time to chill any drink to where it's almost too cold to drink.
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Immerse in *drained* ice or snow and spin. Maintain *pressure* of ice against can. Drain the melt. *Spin* the can about 60 rpm with your hand. This gets you below 40 deg F in a minute.
You must maintain the pressure and drain the melt, or you spoil the heat transfer. The intimate contact with a phase-change substance is critical.
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Richard J Kinch wrote:

Or you could just add a bunch of salt to the ice, thus lowering the freezing point of the meltwater. This allows for better contact with the can as there are no air pockets.
A saturated saltwater solution will get to -20C or -4F. Plenty cold enough to chill your beer.
Chris
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Chris Friesen writes:

No. You confuse temperature and heat. The phase change is crucial.
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Well, yes, but so is lowering the temperature at which that phase transition occurs.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller writes:

The retention of melt water is a spoiler at any temperature. The product must be in continuous, intimate thermal contact with the unmelted ice, and the melt water rapidly drained away. This is what makes the heat transfer fast. Undrained, the heat transfer slows down remarkably. The melt water has no appreciable heat-sinking capacity, and just interferes with the heat leaving the beverage and flowing to the ice. And the OPs desire was for the fastest possible chill. Using brine (or glycol antifreeze if you really want to experiment) will also lower the terminal temperature, although it slows down reaching it, to where the beverage will be frozen and slushy, not good.
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Or rapidly stirred...
Nick
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That's just complete nonsense -- suggest you look up, and compare, the specific heat of water vs. specific heat of ice.

Which is achieved using the fastest possible heat transfer. Again -- suggest you investigate which is capable of absorbing, and transferring, heat at a greater rate, ice or water.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller writes:

Nope. The heat of fusion, not the specific heat, is what flash chills. As I said, the phase change is crucial.
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It doesn't seem that you've ever made ice cream at home.
Quite right that the phase change is crucial. However, you're utterly mistaken when you think that the cooling will be most rapid if the melt water is drained away. The objective is to remove heat from the can of beer as rapidly as possible, and that will happen when the beer is immersed in a bath of icewater. Not when it's immersed in a pile of ice.
And the reason for that is that water is a better conductor of heat than ice, and thus heat transfers from the beer can to water faster than it transfers from the beer can to ice. On top of that, water transfers heat away from the beer can by convection as well as conduction, and obviously ice won't.
In short, rapid heat transfer is the name of the game, and you get that with icewater, not with ice.
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I tend to agree.

Water has a 0.596 W/mC conductance, vs 2.26 for ice. But it's hard to keep the can completely in contact with ice, and that way, the heat transfer from the ice is limited to the can surface. If the can is in a large well-stirred bath of ice and water, the ice will have lots of heat transfer area to water, and the can surface will be very close to the temp it would be if the entire can surface were in contact with ice.
Nick
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wrote:

Well, maybe... that depends at least in part on the relative masses of the ice, and the can of beer. Figure a can of beer at somewhere around 350 grams. Pop a room-temperature beer into, say, 20 or 30 kg of ice at -20 deg C in a well-insulated container, and the beer will eventually assume pretty near the same temperature as the ice, long before any significant melting of the ice can occur.
OTOH, put the same beer, and the same 20 or 30 kg of ice at -20 C into a water bath, and the beer will *never* get colder than 0 C.
Which, of course, is why you add salt when you're making homemade ice cream: so that the ice will melt at a lower temperature, giving you a water bath that's much colder than 0 C.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

That "well-insulated" would have to be adiabatic, but in that case the end result would be about right if the mass of the ice were large wrt the beer.

The prize! _Finally_, somebody made a cogent explanation...
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