Instant Cooling to 35deg.F

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I am looking for a means to instantly cool a can of beer to 35deg. F. When I go camping. On hot summer days I like to go camping and sit back to some very cold beers. I am the type of person whose job responsibilities tend to fluctuate every day based on the weather and other conditions. Therefore, I may discover at any time that there won't be any work for the next few days. That's when I take off to go camp at one of my favorite woods, and that could be any day of the week, not just holidays or weekends.
When I leave to the campsite I make a grocery and beer run, pack my cooler, hook up my camping trailer and within a few hours I am heading off to camp. The problem is that when I get to camp, my beer is never really cold. It sits in some ice for an hour or two and does not get cold enough in such short time. I dont normally keep beer in the fridge at home because I dont drink when I am working and it never fails someone else will drink it before I am ready to go camping. Otherwise I'd keep some right under the freezer compartment.
With that said, my object is to find a method to chill a can of beer, or soda, or anything else in a can from room temperature to near freezing temperature within a minute or less. I am aware that there are certain gases that cause ice to form on a tank. For example, using a disposible propane cylinder will form ice on the cylinder when the gas is released quickly (like when I use my big weed burner torch). I know there are other gases such as nitrogen or is it hydrogen that can have this same effect. My question is what can I use that is readily available, not extremely expensive, safe to use, and will chill the can in seconds? The other question is how to use the stuff in a portable environment. In other words, something I can carry in my camper that simply involves using a hose, some sort of cooling container for the beer can, and simply means turning on a valve, giving me an ice cold beer in a minute or less. Remember, it must be safe and something I can legally carry in a vehicle without using up too much space.
All useful advice appreciated.
George
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snipped-for-privacy@hot-o-mail.com wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@hot-o-mail.com wrote: ...

Ain't gonna happen.
In those hours you're getting ready add in a trip by the store and start w/ chilled would be far cheaper and simpler than all the b/s you're proposing.
This reeks of "troll"...
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dpb wrote:

beer can chiller ($68) after a 5 second Google search for "beer can chiller." Either that or he's just too lazy, and I've gone and done the work for him. No I haven't, I'm not posting the URL this time.
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Starting at 70 F in an ice bath, a 12 oz 2.5"x5" beer can with 0.34 ft^2 of surface and 2 30 Btu/h-F-ft^2 natural convection water conductances in series and RC = 2/(0.34x30)x12/16 = 0.147 hours (8.8 minutes) would cool to 35 in -8.8ln((35-32)/(70-32)) = 22 minutes.
Spinning the can to raise the conductances by a factor of 20 would make this 1.1 minutes.
Adding 30% calcium chloride to lower the ice temp to -50 F would make this 0.44ln((35-(-50))/(70-(-50)) = 0.15 minutes, ie 9 seconds.

The $10 Tinchilla looks interesting...
Nick
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snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

You're saying that dissolving calcium chloride is endothermic?
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clifto wrote:

No. What he meant was that the calcium chloride would allow the ice to become liquid at -50F. This would give an icewater bath.
Pure ice at -50F would be solid, and wouldn't conduct nearly as well due to air pockets around the can.
However, good luck finding a freezer that will give you ice at -50F...
Chris
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Chris Friesen wrote:

I guess the far North or South in their respective winter seasons get there on occasion...maybe OP should change his destination. :)
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Chris Friesen wrote:

That's what I figured.
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It doesn't need -50F ice. Put salt in ice and the temp drops. Remember ice cream makers?
O.P. - Try a bucket of ice with some salt and enough water to fill the voids. Keep it moving to swirl the beer for maximum cooling.
Or - learn to enjoy good beer that doesn't need to be 35F to be drinkable.
Bob
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Bob F wrote:

I was afraid to make that comment! Coming from the other side of The Pond, ice cold beer just ain't beer! ;)
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clot wrote:

However, when you are shopping for beer in an American convenience store, you want it so cold that if you bump the bottle little ice crystals instantly form in it. There's a HUGE difference between an American-style lager and a good stout or porter. They're both ostensibly called "beer" but they're two different beverages entirely and comparisons are unfair.
Now Budweiser, that's just nuckin' fasty.
nate
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wrote:

Better than Stroh's. Or Rhinelander (possibly the worst beer in the world; definitely the worst I've ever tasted).
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.

I say. A chap shouldn't be afraid of defending their preference for warm beer old boy. Is there really any other way? I mean to say; the need to chill any beer to a temperature where you can't taste the darn stuff anyway may mean that it's not good beer anyway; what? And as to this stuff in bottles and tin cans! Well ..................... what can one say. Only good for cooking a chicken on a barbecue; as one associate often says! Now a Guiness etc. at close to room temperature "Is good for you". :-) Cold beer? UGH!
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wrote:

Go to Ireland sometime and order a Guiness. You'll find that you've never actually had one before. The stuff they ship out is very different from what they serve on the home field.
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terry wrote:

Loved it. Cans and bottles do not go with beer!
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Bob F wrote:

But it doesn't get even _close_ to the -50F Nick suggests obtaining to meet the desired 15 sec cooling time which is where this subthread originated..
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Calcium chloride is a salt. The ASHRAE HOF says a 32% solution starts to crystallize at -19.5 F, 30% at -50.8, 29.87% at -67.0, 29% at -49.4, 25% at -21.0, and 20% at -0.4. We might start at 30% and use just enough ice (about 12/16(70-35)/144 = 0.2 pounds) to make the beer exactly 35 F when the ice has all melted (frozen beer is no good), including the coolth from the heat capacity and temperature of the final solution and calcium chloride's heat of dilution.

... 1 minute, IIRC. The best sodium chloride solution is 23% at -5.1 F.
Nick
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Bob F wrote:

It drops to -50F?
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When I worked in a shop, the heat treating dept had a frig chest for heat/cool treating powdered metal parts. It went to -180/-200 F. Half the time when you opened it there were big plastic parts bins full of ice for the after work ball game. Sometimes they even brought ball game equipment.
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