Installing wall boxes for receptacles

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*For 3/4" he might be better off with these from Arlington: http://www.arlcatalog.com/Miscellaneous/Box%20Extenders.htm
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On 7/2/2011 8:48 AM, John Grabowski wrote:

John,
Thanks for bringing these to my attention. Even though the extenders are easy apply, it might be quite a chore if I have to do every box in the 2800 sq. ft. house (2 floors, plus a basement). This could easily be 50 boxes.
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Rebel1 wrote:

Of course, no one here can make you do anything. But in your original post you wrote,
"I removed the cover plates for several of the GFI wall outlets and wall switches over a friend's house (built 1993). I was surprised that the fronts of the receptacle boxes were about 1/4 inch BEHIND the inside of the wallboard, leaving a uniform air gap of 1/4 inch on all four sides. Is this allowed by code?"
If you want to correct the problem and meet the code, you could easily do all 50 boxes for less than $50 in box extenders bought from someplace like this:
http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Search?keyword=box+extenders&langId=-1&storeId051&catalogId053 .
If it's your friend's house, and you removed the cover plates for several of the GFI wall outlets, I am guessing you are doing some work there which may involve the electrical wiring. Even if all you are doing is helping your friend out for free, I think it would be a good idea to just do the easy and dirt-cheap fix that is required for safety reasons. If you don't want to do it, maybe you could show your friend and he/she could do it. I am not sure why you posted the original question if you are so reluctant to just do the easy fix and correct this safety issue that you uncovered.
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Modern boxes have little tabs that you use to position them on the side of the framing stud you are nailingthem to. It results in about 3/8" sticking out. The box is supposed to protrude into the wallboard.
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I think there is a problem there. My info has always been for the box to at least extend part way into the sheetrock to preserve the fireproof theory.
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On 7/1/2011 10:38 AM, hr(bob) snipped-for-privacy@att.net wrote:

The boxes in non combustible material should be flush, but in no case, set back more than 1/4". In combustible material, they must be flush
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1) No
2) Yes
Joe
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that's not right, or even code compliant. front of box must be at least ahead of the back of the wallboard, and preferably just short of flush with it (I say just short of, because the installation will look best when the plaster ears are resting on the wallboard and not the box.)
nate
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wrote:

FINISH side of the wallboard IS code compliant. The FINISH side is the side you see, and is virtually what you said was required.
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