Installing Manual Transfer Switch/Generator Advice

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Thanks for that. I didn't know they existed. And I agree, depending on the circumstances, one of those could be a good choice too.
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On 11/6/2012 10:15 AM, Jim Elbrecht wrote:

They are sorta listed http://www.interlockkit.com/warranty01.htm They have a sticker "Listed to UL 67 by [Wylie Labs logo]" Wylie is a Nationally Recognized Testing Lab. Depends on whether your AHJ recognizes Wylie, and what "listed to" means. It is up to the dreaded AHJ

If I remember right, SquareD also has interlocks.
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wrote:

The problem with small generators and interlock kits on your main panel is load management. Finding the combination of breakers the genset will carry and still get what you want going may be tough. Most panel directories are just a rough idea of what you are powering when you turn them on. You certainly are well served by spending the time to get a detail map of what each breaker controls. Using a clamp on amp meter is a plus.
You really want to do this on a sunny day in good weather, before the storm. Create another directory with which breakers you want on in different scenarios. Your dryer may be the only thing on the genny if you want to do a load of clothes. ... and you will
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On Nov 6, 11:39 am, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

It may be difficult if you're totally clueless. But otherwise, for most folks here, the process is simple. Just disable all significant loads at the appliance itself and/or by opening large breakers.
AC, oven, electric water heater will have 30A+ breaker Furnace can be shut off at furnace safety switch or via thermostat Make sure you don't have any electric heaters plugged in. Then open all breakers and selectively turn on what you need one at a time.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

-snip-
-snip-
I've already got that part down. That's pretty much what I do anyway- With extension cords to the panel for now. Pick a circuit, disconnect it, and tap into it at the box.
I got as far with the transfer switch as deciding which circuits would be used-- and how I'd combine one because in a perfect world I could use things that appear on 7 circuits. The interlock cover/kit solves that nicely.
All I need to do now is determine what would be the best way to write simple instructions on something that 10 years from now, the dog can go down and follow.

I remember doing it many years ago and it *was* an adventure. There is some real creative wiring in this old house.
Jim
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On 11/6/2012 9:24 AM, HeyBub wrote:

To store, to find when needed. To attempt to be used say by a child or an elderly person or even you if sick.

Its a lot better to just have something that works. I would much rather have the heating system, fridge and other basic stuff running and maybe worry about a flashlight than have to scramble in the dark or when sick trying to get a heybub system running.
My neighbor paid a whopping $300 to have an automatic transfer switch wired in.

It often costs a few bucks to get a decent system installed but it certainly isn't a fortune. I also paid to have water lines run and to have a permanent heating system.

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George wrote:

My suggestion on extension cords was not meant to be an end-all, be-all. But it IS a practical solution for some configurations and some needs. Extension cords are worth considering, especially for the simple and straight-forward application put forth by the OP.
Me? I have an interlock.
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Installing Manual Transfer Switch/Generator Advice:

Not likely. I wold go with at least 6500 peak.
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On 11/2/2012 5:51 PM, noname wrote:

years old). Just kill the power and wire up a few breakers. I assume someone fairly handy can do this yes? (did plenty of home wiring in our old house) Was thinking 6 circuit Reliance transfer switch (20 or 30 amp) would do the trick.

Probably the cheapest way to do a transfer switch is an interlock kit: http://www.interlockkit.com/CATALOG2008.pdf (originally from John Grabowski)
You put a circuit breaker in the panel adjacent to the service disconnect and back feed it from the generator. There is a mechanical interlock mechanism on the panel cover that prevents both the service disconnect and generator breaker from being on at the same time. You turn on only what you want to run at a particular time and the generator can handle.
The code also wants a simple mechanism from the manufacturer that prevents the backfed generator breaker from unplugging.
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bud-- wrote:

Have you seen the prices on these? To fit my Square-D box, the part number is K-5010. This part is a flat piece of metal, about 6x6 inches, with two holes for screws. The price is $150.00 (up)!
If it wasn't dishonest - or at least immoral, I'd buy one from Grainger, copy it on a piece of sheet aluminum, then return the original to Grainger.
Anybody have one I can borrow to make the copy? Or can you provide a tracing of yours?
As of this moment, I don't have an interlock. I DO have detailed instructions on the inside of the breaker box.
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Current thinking is to install an Interlock kit. Looks like for my GE breaker panel it costs $149. Going to call my electrician to see how much he will charge to install it. Seems more difficult to install than a transfer switch.
On Saturday, November 3, 2012 6:11:04 PM UTC-4, HeyBub wrote:

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It seems "GE PowerMark Gold Load Center/Generator Interlock Kit" for $43, plus a "Reliance Controls 20-Amp Power Inlet Box" for $51 plus the wire and generator cable is all that I would need, right?
All the breakers I would turn on are 120 volt 20 amp ones. Is that the correct inlet box I would need for a 5000 watt generator?
Thanks.
On Sunday, November 4, 2012 12:29:03 PM UTC-5, noname wrote:

breaker panel it costs $149. Going to call my electrician to see how much he will charge to install it. Seems more difficult to install than a transfer switch.

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I would like to see an overall diagram.
Of course, I'm interested.
Greg
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noname wrote:

Piddly. You drill two holes in the panel cover to mount the plate. Done.
This thing is a flat piece of metal that slides left-to-right (or up/down) to prevent both the main breaker and the one going to your generator plug from both being "ON" at the same time.
Have you seen the number of wires involved in a transfer switch? For six circuits, you have to re-route and connect about 14 separate wires. And about half of them will be two inches too short ! You have to mount the sucker on the wall. All in all, a non-trivial installation.
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Being the OP I've just decided to install a 6 circuit transfer switch. $250 does seem like much since I can install it myself. Thanks for all the input.
On Friday, November 2, 2012 7:51:04 PM UTC-4, noname wrote:

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