Installing Manual Transfer Switch/Generator Advice

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Going to install a transfer switch so I can run a generator to power oil furnace, refrigerator, and a couple of other devices (maybe TV/ Microwave).
Will a 5000 watt peak generator do the trick? Any advice on brands (don't want to break the bank)?
Transfer switch for this seems a straight forward install (house is only 6 years old). Just kill the power and wire up a few breakers. I assume someone fairly handy can do this yes? (did plenty of home wiring in our old house) Was thinking 6 circuit Reliance transfer switch (20 or 30 amp) would do the trick.
Thanks for any advice!
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On 11/2/2012 4:51 PM, noname wrote:

years old). Just kill the power and wire up a few breakers. I assume someone fairly handy can do this yes? (did plenty of home wiring in our old house) Was thinking 6 circuit Reliance transfer switch (20 or 30 amp) would do the trick.

Ok, here is some advice! Do you own you house free and clear? If so, go ahead and do it yourself. If there is a problem and your insurance won't pay, you are out the money.
If you have a mortgage and you have a serious problem with the switch or your wiring and the insurance won't pay, your mortgage holder will probably require you to pay off the balance immediately and make them not liable for any losses.
Get it installed professionally. Not that expensive.
Paul
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On Fri, 02 Nov 2012 17:24:57 -0700, Paul Drahn

I don't know the skill level of the OP so I'm not going to say if he should do it or not. The rest is BS though. The insurance will pay for your incompetence.
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Paul Drahn wrote:

It IS that expensive.
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On 11/3/2012 6:18 AM, HeyBub wrote:

But not everyone is interested in heybub quality work.
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George wrote:

Heh! Good rejoinder!
But you can't know the quality of my work. For example, I once turned an electrical distribution panel into a sub-panel by simply slaving it to the panel located six inches away. It's lasted, now, for, oh, two weeks or more.
So there.
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On Friday, November 2, 2012 7:51:04 PM UTC-4, noname wrote:

We have a 5,500 watt generator. I ran lines from the generator to the well pump for water, the oil-fired water heater, the oil furnace, the refrigerator and the freezer. It keeps them all going but I have to unplug each from the house current and plug them into the generator lines when the power goes out. Plus we have a spare extention cord that can be plugged into one of the microwave, coffe maker, reading lamp, etc., as needed.
I wired this all myself but wouldn't install a transfer switch myself. I plan to get a larger generator with a transfer switch next year, having a professional electrician do the hookup for insurance and safety considerations.
Paul
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How did you hook up the furnace without a transfer switch?
On Friday, November 2, 2012 8:32:32 PM UTC-4, Pavel314 wrote:

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On 11/2/2012 5:51 PM, noname wrote:

Depends on where you live. In the US, code appears to clearly state that the furnace must be permanently attached. But the consensus appears to be that it's routinely ignored. When I asked the local electrical inspector, he didn't even know about it and said he would approve a plug. YMMV
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I'd like to see a citation for that.

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On 11/7/2012 6:28 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzz wrote:

It was covered in a long thread about a year ago.

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wrote:

In the entire US? Everywhere? Get real.

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On 11/8/2012 7:40 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzz wrote:

The NEC is the basis for electrical codes "everywhere". If the NEC is enforced you can't connect a furnace with a cord and plug. The AHJ, as mike wrote, can allow it.
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wrote:

It is not specified in the code. It is just the manufacturer's installation instruction and the listing of the furnace.
For that matter, it is a violation of the listing to replace the plug on a lamp or a tool but I don't see swat teams breaking down your door to arrest you for it.
I am an inspector and if this was done using a proper cord and cord grip, I would not say a thing. When I asked my boss what article 90-4 meant, he said, just make sure it's safe.
"90.4 Enforcement. This Code is intended to be suitable for mandatory application by governmental bodies that exercise legal jurisdiction over electrical installations, including signaling and communications systems, and for use by insurance inspectors. The authority having jurisdiction for enforcement of the Code has the responsibility for making interpretations of the rules, for deciding on the approval of equipment and materials, and for granting the special permission contemplated in a number of the rules."
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On 11/9/2012 11:57 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Which is also an NEC requirement under 110.3-B
------------------- I take the question to be whether an ordinary furnace can be connected to the wiring system with a cord and plug that plugs into a receptacle.
It does not, IMHO, fit any of the permitted uses for cord connection in 400.7-A.
It is, IMHO, a substitute for fixed wiring, which is prohibited in 400.8.
And the plug, by itself, is prohibited in 400.7-B

It is not changing the way the equipment was intended to be connected and is compliant with 400.7 and .8.

As I wrote, the AHJ can allow it.
A furnace could be wired with a short cord (maybe a foot) to a receptacle, where there is no strain from a long cord on the cap. That could be relatively sensible if you wanted an easy way to connect to a generator.
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Pardon my English and lack of proper jargon. PLease comment on the following: My heating system is ~10 years old, gas-fired, with a 0.75A water circulating pump, damper relay and thermostat, located in the basement of this 83 year-old house.
I want to wire the furnace so I can use a generator and not have to fiddle with the existing wiring every time. I am planning to use a 3 ft cord, gently stapled to the joist, because the area is relatively inaccessible over the boiler. This would make it easier to change the plug from outlet 1 to outlet 2. The cord will be wired into existing junction box (1).
The cord will be alternatively plugged into outlet 1 or 2, which are separate (dual) outlets in the same (new) junction box (2). There will be a continuous ground between outlets 1 and 2, also attached to the metal box.
Outlet 1 will be get power from the Romex cable that now is wired into existing junction box (1) leading to furnace, thermostat etc. It comes from another junction box (3) with 1 of 3 switches that each cut off power to the furnace (don't ask). This switch is the oldest, electrically closest to the breaker panel. There is another switch at the bottom of the basement stairs, and then the newest switch is mounted on the furnace.
Outlet 2 will be wired with a short cord (gently stapled to the same joist) with a plug where it will be plugged into the generator cord, which will only be there during generator usage.
That's the plan ...
Stated differently:
Furnace etc ---> box ----> corded plug either to outlet 1 or outlet 2. Outlet 1 and outlet 2 in 1 metal junction box with continuous ground. Outlet 1 will be wired by romex cable into the existing wiring, i.e. directly into the breaker, nothing else on that breaker. Outlet 2 will be wired to a cord and plug, ready to be plugged into the cord from the generator. There will not be neutral or hot wires connecting outlet 1 to outlet 2. The corded plugs will be from heavy duty window air conditioner cords.
--
Best regards
Han
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If you are doing this with a single duplex receptacle, don't forget to break the tabs off between both terminal screws.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote in

I had been thinking about that. Would likely make things easier with the grounding. For the moment I am planning on using 2 separate duplex receptacles (that was the term I was looking for ...). That gives an extra outlet each ...
--
Best regards
Han
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wrote:

(A)(6)"Connection of utilization equipment to facilitate frequent interchange".
Since neither "frequent" nor "interchange" are defined it is a "hold your nose" legal loophole.
A waste disposal is also a fixed in place appliance and we have no problem with them being C&P with similar sized motor loads.

See above.

(B) Attachment Plugs. Where used as permitted in 400.7(A)(3), (A)(6), and (A)(8), each flexible cord shall be equipped with an attachment plug and shall be energized from a receptacle outlet.
How is that? it is intended to be plugged into a receptacle.

It is still a violation of the listing and after you knock down the 400.7 problem, that is what you are left with.

Which is pretty much what we have been talking about.
Don't get me wrong, I can argue your side just as well ... but not to a homeowner who is freezing his balls off and worrying about his pipes.
This can be done safely and that is my biggest concern.
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On Nov 10, 1:47am, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Han is located in NJ. I have never seen a cord and plug connected furnace in NJ, where code enforcement tends to be stricter than in many other parts of the country. Not saying they don't exist. Just that if he wants it to be code compliant, he should ask the local inspector.
For me, this re-wiring of individual appliances, in most cases, doesn't make sense. You can do minimal and easy re-wiring once, at the panel, and then power whatever you want in the whole house. You do that with a lockout device on the panel, ie Interlockit kit or new panel cover, plus a new double pole breaker connected to an inlet. Code compliant and when power fails, you just run one extension cord from the generator to the inlet. It's the safe, legal way of doing what many people already do, ie backfeeding via a dryer outlet, etc.
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