Installing Drywall on Ceiling

Hello,
I'm installing some 4' x 8' drywall on a ceiling. Is that stuff ever heavy. I'm wondering if the screws I have will be enough to hold it. Should I use some sort of adhesive? What type of screws should I use? Any other advice on how to ensure that this doesn't come crashing down one day?
Thanks Sam
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Just use regular drywall screws, no adhesive needed. Also if you want you can rent a drywall lift at at Home depot or tool rental place. I rented mine for $25, it was the best money I spent. I had to hang 3 sheets of 4'X12' in my kitchen by myself.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks for the reply. The heads on the screws seem to be so small. Won't the drywall just push down over them given time? How far apart should the screws be in the 2x4 they will be screwed into?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The ceilings I've seen professionally installed seem to be spaced every 12 to 18 inches. I put them every six to eight inches on the ceiling, but I like to over-do. Drywall screws are cheap.
Drive the screws in until the head is below the surface of the drwyall, dimpling the paper. If you drive to far and tear the paper, put in another screw properly next to the one that tore. The paper is what provides the support.
Pay a couple of bucks extra for the paperless wallboard. It has fiberglass covering instead of paper, and it is less likely to mold.
If this is a bathroom or other damp area, use the water-resistant wallboard.
--
Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Kudos to you Steve, for more great advice. But, in this case, I have to ask the question:
Are you suggesting that they use green board (or similar) in baths and the fiberglass stuff (DensArmour) elsewhere? I used DensArmour only in my bath just for it's water resistance.
JK
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I was being vague about "water-resistant wallboard" because code varies. If DensArmor is OK in your area for damp areas, I'd use that. I wouldn't use it, or greenboard either, in a wet area like a shower or tub surround, even though lots of people do. I've repaired too many tiled walls with rotted wallboard behind.
--
Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have seen greenboard with mold on it so many times that I wonder what is different about it besides the color. Thanks for the clarification.
JK
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Big_Jake wrote:

(Thank you mr google...)
The biggest shortcoming in application/installations w/ greenboard is the failure to follow the recommendations/instructions in the last paragraph above.
Depending on the brand/product, there may or may not be extra mildewcides on the paper surface; it isn't surprising if there is moisture penetration behind the surface covering that mold will form.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

12 to 18 inches on a ceiling...? That's not a professional installation even if they were licensed and paid for the job.
USG's sag resistant 1/2" ceiling panels can have screws 12" on center, but standard 1/2" drywall is usually 6" to 8" on center. You're not overdoing it, you're doing it just right.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sammy wrote:

2x4s?
What's the span?
I think 2x4s are only rated for about 4-5ft. max.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Trusses are most commonly made with 2x4 stock. The span can be quite large.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RicodJour wrote:

Guess I missed the part about it being a truss.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

It's unclear what the construction is. You were questioning the span with 2x4s, seeming to indicate you were assuming it was a 2x4 joist, and I was pointing out that it could be a truss. Only the OP knows for sure.
The wood species, live and dead loads and deflection requirements also have a lot to do with the allowable span. With a 10 PSF live load, a 5 PSF dead load, southern pine, #2 grade 2x4s at 16" on center, and a 1/240 deflection limit the allowable span is a bit over 11 feet.
Obviously that's way more information than the OP will have on hand, so there's really no point asking. When in doubt, send them to an engineer.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Just use regular drywall screws, no adhesive needed. Also if you want you can rent a drywall lift at at Home depot or tool rental place. I rented mine for $25, it was the best money I spent. I had to hang 3 sheets of 4'X12' in my kitchen by myself.
Ditto....Good advice...
Inch and a quarter drywall screws should be installed as follows with screw heads just barely dimpling the paper so they can be filled with mud...NOT TO DEEP or they will pop through...Use a drywall screwgun or the attachment for your cordless drill that sets them at the right depth automatically for best results....
1 on the tapered edge , 3 in the field , and 1 on the other edge...Like this.. |. . . . .|
On the butt or end of the sheet they should be about 6 inches apart... Like this... |..........|
Hope this helps...Good luck with your project....If you need taping help just ask.....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Standard weight of 1/2" is around 52 lbs. Not all that heavy, but very awkward.

No.
! 1/4" bugle head drywall screws. Galvanized if near a potential wet area. Space 8 - 12 inches.

Rent a drywall screwdriver, corded if possible. Use it at low speed until you get the hang of it. Get a few drywall bits with the little hood which prevents breaking through the paper. Download the 350 + page pdf USG Gypsum Construction Manual for more information. Buy a Magna Sand outfit before you start the tape-and-mud part or hire pros to do that. Double check all your ceiling joists before starting for level, and shim or plane as needed. Don't work alone, you need extra hands for best results.
Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 2 Jun 2009 07:17:50 -0700 (PDT), Sammy

Don't need adhesive, just drywall screws. Use a little more than what you would on the wall. Often, walls go up after the ceiling and that provides perimeter support.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.