Installing baseboard radiators myself?

We have electric baseboard heat now and I would like to convert to oil heating system. I would like to know what is the fair price for installing a new radiator system alone, _not_ including the furnace. I am thinking whether I can do the pipe work myself and then have oil company to install the furnace later. I don't have knowledge in heating system but I think I can have two branches. One remains in the basement and another one for upstair which look like the water pipe can go along the ceiling of the basement and poke up to the floor above in places where radiators are needed and then go down to the basement ceiling again. Is it something I can do without a professional? TIA.
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I have no idea.

Maybe, it is not fair straight forward. First, you have to know what size baseboard you need. Each room will usually have one wall with the metal on it for appearance, but only a portion may be needed with the actual finned tubing. This has to be sized out first.
Next, how good are you at soldering in tight places? This is probably the most difficult and critical parts of the job. Even if you have a pro do that portion of the job, you can save by drilling the holes and mounting the hardware. Ed
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There is more to it than just installing the radiators and running the piping. Another poster mentioned proper sizing. Another tricky part is getting the piping sloped (or not sloped in some cases) to make sure the air bleeds are at the high spot, and there are no loops that will trap air and cause the system to air lock. Basement radiators where the piping is run above require special care to avoid airlocks.
If you are going to have multiple zones you have to decide if you will have zone valves, multiple circulators, or passive flow splitting tees. This greatly affects how you will do the plumbing: a big loop, two loops, each area home run back to a manifold, etc.
See if your library has "Modern Hydronic Heating" by Siegenthaler. Spend a few hours or days studying that and then decide if you are up to the task. This is not a job you want to do or have done twice.
HTH,
Paul Franklin
(remove nospam to email)
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wrote:

Probably not...but only you'll know for sure.
Read Paul's very wise post. At the very least, you should probably have more than one zone...to conserve energy and accompanying costs.
And you'll need to run some wiring, too.
Good luck.
Have a nice week...
Trent
Certified breast self-exam subcontractor.
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Have you even considered underfloor radiant heat? http://www.radiantec.com /
Nothing beats being able to place your furniture wherever the hell you damn please.
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