Installing a shower rod in ceramic tile ...

Hello, I have a bathtub/shower than reaches 82 inches from wall to wall. THe standard tension rod only extends to 72 inches. I really don't want to drill into the ceramic tile for fear of cracking it. Soooo, does anybody have a suggestion of what alternatives I might try in order to get a rod in place ??
THanks in advance ! skoozy
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.ca wrote:

That's too far for an extension anyway.
How about putting a couple of screws i n the ceiling?
http://www.signaturehardware.com/product670
or: http://www.bathandmore.com/productinfo.php?CategoryID &ProductID1
or something similar.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.ca wrote:

They do make longer exension rods. A Dremel tool with a burr bit will grind right through ceramic tile without cracking it. I've put up a lot of bath safety rails using my dremel and have never cracked a tile.
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I've drilled into ceramic tile many times without any problems. Trick was to use a centre punch (lightly) to mark the spot (I think this helps to release the tile's surface tension) and a masonry bit at moderate speed and pressure. Might not hurt to go to your local building supplier and buy one ceramic tile to experiment first.
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drilling ceramic is not hard. Get a scratch awl and use it to scratch the center of your holes. Then use a masonary bit. The scratch from the awl will keep the bit skating. Ceramic tile is not a particularly hard substance and you'll be surprised how quick you'll drill right through.
We installed a new ceramic bath in our old house, and when putting the enclosure I had the same fears as you, but once I tried I found they were unwarranted.
Just make sure you install something that you can live with. It will be impossible to patch up the holes cosmetically if you change to a different style rod that doesn't cover them up.
-Tim
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The tile itself is soft.The thin ceramic coating is hard as...well...glass.
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Once it gets chipped/cracked with the scratch awl, it won't be in the way.
-Tim
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Makes sense to me Tim. Once the slightest hole/scratch in that glaze/porcelean it's Holes-Are-Us :-)
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On 1 Oct 2006 16:38:15 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.ca wrote:

Ah suggestions, let me think what I would do.
1. Glue it. :) Sounds weird but some silcone caulks are pretty tough to move once fully cured.
2. Drill. I would remember advice I got, about breakign the glaze first and drilling with a mason bit. Breaking the glaze is by using a center punch, and tapping where you want to drill first. However, I would first practice on a few spare tiles I have or can buy from HD so I do it once correctly.
Good luck, tell us what you did.
imho,
tom @ www.NoCostAds.com
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