Installing a fence....

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"Jim Redelfs" wrote in message

Unfortunately, some communities have rules about what type of fence you can put on your property... It sucks... Every house looks alike, no originality...
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A) Get the tree removed by a pro -- ASAP. A dead tree is a falling tree. And yes, they usually climb and take it down section by section.
B) Consult your city first. First of all, because some have rules about dropping trees and second because most have rules about fences. Almost all have height restrictions on how tall a fence you can build.
C) "Truing the fence" that is making it all straight and even is the toughest part. I have only repaired sections of already built fence and that is tough enough for me.....
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where your property lines are so you building on your land. A general rule of thumb is 2-3 feet in on your side from the property line if you are bordering your property to allow for painting and repairs in case you get a difficult neighbor next door in the future, or have one now!
Jay
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With the help of 2 handy buddies, I installed 450' of dog ear fence in a weekend. Dug the holes, set the poles, added 2 horizontal boards, and nailed up the dog ears.
As stated elsewhere, the big problem is setting the poles. We spent most of day 1 doing that and we had a tractor with an auger to dig the holes.
Day 2 was spent running nailguns...
We were very impressed with ourselves when the fence (with 3 gates) was finished at the end of day 2.
KB

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My two cents...I think PDQ hit the nail on the head...the hardest part is the fence posts. A fence was one of my first DIY projects and turned out to be fairly easy. I dug the holes and was extra careful about the placement of the posts. I started in a corner to set the first post. I set it in concrete so that held it pretty well and used a post level (about 5 bucks at a hardware store) to tell when the post was plumb in both directions. I ran mason line the length of the run to make sure the posts were not twisted and were even with each other. I used a tape measure to set the posts the same distance apart (about 8 feet) measured center to center. All in all it took a day to dig the holes, and a day to set the posts. I had one post that was about 6 inches higher than the rest of them..no problem...5 minutes with a circular saw and problem solved. From there i bought the prefabbed fence sections from Home Depot. If you set your posts right it only takes a couple of hours to put the fence sections up. I used a line level to set the height and then hit it with screws. Everything but putting the panels up is a one person job. The panels are heavy enough that i held them while someone else screwed them. Also, when i dug my post holes I did it using a post hole digger. Not the way to go...you can rent a power auger and knock them out in a few hours. You can concrete the posts in, but if you are afraid of making a mistake, you can just set them in gravel. You can used treated wood, but it will turn grey as it weathers. You can clean it with a power washer once in a while and that will help. If you use cedar, the cost goes up but the finished product looks nice.
Good luck. IMHO this is a DIY project, even if you are not that handy. Take your time and set the posts right and the rest will go smooth. Or, like PDQ said..hire a pro to set the posts.
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One more thing....I learned a lesson when i did my fence. When you have your locates done, have them locate the utilities for your neighbors too. None of my utilites interfered with my fence....so i dug without a worry. And still cut a cable. My next door neighbor's tv cable cut across the back corner of my property....and they only marked my stuff. After that cut, I called them back out and discovered i had both tv and electric cables for my neighbors running across my yard. Could have been bad. Since i had the stuff marked the cable company paid for the repair.
Al
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My two cents:
If you're counting on the fence to hold dogs in, you should consider that some dogs love to dig and will go under the fence, rather than over it.
If it were my fence, I'd make it is one of the vinyl ones that don't need painting and aren't subjet to rot.
In addition to checking local ordinances on where fences can go, how high, etc, also make absolutely sure you know where your property line is before you put the fence up
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Running a concrete strip along the bottom of the fence will stop many of the dogs... It also helps prevent dirt getting in contact with the bottom of the wooden fence and keeps the bottoms from rotting out as quickly... Some people just bury some chicken wire along the edge of the fence...

Assuming your dog doesn't like to chew on the plastic... My dog *loves* PVC pipe... If you are even a mediocre welder, it's not that difficult to weld up your own metal fence... When you buy the metal at the steel supply stores in the 20 ft lengths, the 1/2" solid bar stock is not that much more than the 1/2" square tubing that is around 16-gauge... The horizonal pieces of the fence will be at least 3/4"... Anything larger than 3/4" will definitely be square tubing, not bar stock... Posts will be 1.5 or 2 inches and also square tubing...
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