Install TV cable outlet

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I would revise these excellent steps only slightly: After cutting the low hole in the drywall behind the baseboard, use a _long_ bit on the thinner side to drill a pilot hole down to the basement. From the basement, locate the pilot hole, and use it as the center point to drill a hole a little larger than the coaxial cable straight up inside the wall. This puts less tension on the coax as it comes up through the stringer into the inside of the wall. (Just an extra obsession of mine.) Fish the coaxup through the hole up to where you're putting the box. Replace the baseboard. (Patch the hole beforehand if you're feeling particularly anal/compulsive, as I would.)
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Kyle wrote:

Good idea! I suppose whether to drill a pilot hole might depend, too, on the geometry and available tools.
One problem in removing baseboards is the corner miters. Sometimes you have to start four baseboards back because of the way they overlap! No biggie, though. This is a convenient excuse to take the baseboards outside, fill in the nicks, sand, and repaint them.
Hint: Don't drive out the nails from the baseboard - cut them off from the back.
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HeyBub wrote:

Drilling the pilot hole through the drywall just above the baseboard would be a lot easier both in not removing the baseboard, and ease of patching a small hole in the drywall.
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Pete C. wrote:

That would work for most places. Good idea.
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HeyBub wrote:

The next step above that is to make the opening for the LV box and then drill down via that hole using one of the flexi-bits and the guide tool.
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wrote:

Why not drill the pilot hole right at the bottom of the baseboard and through the floor. If the hole is small enough it will never be noticed. That's what the Geek Squad did in a friend's house. When I put in a cable wire I didn't even use a box. Just attached the cable to the face plate and fastened it right to the wallboard. No strain on the wire and it's been in about 2 yrs now without a problem. MLD

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Pete C. wrote:

Good point, and one I'll have to remember, since adding some drops here and there has been on my list here for awhile. However, if you have an odd paint color or wallpaper, even a tiny hole can be a pain to patch. Split the difference- use a couple clean Stanley mini-wonderbars, and a couple sheets of cardboard as shields, and slightly pry the baseboard loose from the wall without removing it. Drill the pilot hole through this crevice with one of the Real Long bits (often in the electrical aisle next to the fish tapes), and then proceed with the hole for old-work box and the cable fishing through the hole drilled from below. Or if the baseboard is painted, just drill right through it on the top edge- trivial to patch if wall is too hard to match.
Some of the bits sold to electricians even have an itty-bitty hole in the spade part, to hook a wire on before you pull the drill back out.
-- aem (who will probably never get around to doing the work) sends....
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aemeijers wrote:

Another good option in just pulling the baseboard back a bit.
The ultimate solution if you don't mind spending a few dollars on new tools is the flexi-bits and the guide tool which let you drill the hole straight down from above through the normal LV electrical box hole.
If you haven't seen these, they are essentially a short drill bit welded onto the end of a long small diameter spring steel rod. The guide tool is basically a handle bracket with a couple channels the drill shaft fits in which allows you to reach the bit into the wall cavity through the box hole and bend the shaft so the bit points straight down while the drill (motor) is outside the wall cavity.
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First you dont need a box, a mud plate is enough or just a wall plate with integrated jack. I cut the hole 12 inches OC from the floor then use my right angle drill and flex bit to drill down through the bottom stud plate. When the drill pops through I tape the cable to the bit (after un-chucking the drill), then pull the bit and cable out at once in the basement.
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wrote:

First you dont need a box, a mud plate is enough or just a wall plate with integrated jack. I cut the hole 12 inches OC from the floor then use my right angle drill and flex bit to drill down through the bottom stud plate. When the drill pops through I tape the cable to the bit (after un-chucking the drill), then pull the bit and cable out at once in the basement.
Right--just posted something very similar to your comments about not needing a box. I was able to see the bottom stud plate from the basement (through the spaces of the floor boards) and with careful measurements was to come up in the wall just where I wanted to be. MLD
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I use an old car antena with a point filed in my drill.I drill at an angle at the base of the wall ,than look under flour to see where it came out. Jr. 1/4 inch rod also works but you have to push harder,,,a long screw driver will even drill a hole if it's in a drill
http://community.webtv.net/awoodbutcher/MyWoodWorkingPage
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