Inexpensive house repairs?

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Steve B. wrote:

She should be able to sell it as a Fixer-upper on a prime lot. But it might have to be a cash sale to keep the banks' and insurance companies' and goverment's noses out of her business. If it's uninsurable, she may not get much more for it than what the lot is worth, but she won't know unless she tries.
The only kind of repairs y'all should be making is stuff like painting, repairing shutters, replacing broken glass, putting new washers in the dripping faucets (because you will never recoup the money you spend making major repairs.)
Opinionatedly, Bob
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Steve B. wrote:

Ah. Sell it as a tear-down. Offer to cover demolition as part of the purchase price. Believe me, there *will* be takers in this market.
I recently saw, along a street in a semi-suburban outer Chicago neighborhood, three lots that must have at one time been identical boxlets (one story, <1000 sq. ft. or so). In the middle was an original. On one side were the fruits of the last spate of development some 20 years ago, a six-flat squeezed onto the same size lot, with postage-stamp grass. On the other side was a McMansion in the finishing-touches stage, with approximately the same massing as the six-flat.
The original boxlet could have been its garage. Actually, the garage was probably bigger.
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The "sell as tear down" idea makes good sense when one finds there is an acre of land in a good neighborhood. Dan's experience is similar to mine.
Tom Baker
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wrote:

Contact Assabet Valley Vocational High School in Marlboro. The waiting list is long, but they will tackle stuff like this and their work has a very good reputation.

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To comment on the original post:
- past bankruptcies don't rule out loans. We can talk about it off-line; - any plumbing work in MA must be done by a licensed plumber. If the house is to be sold soon any serious plumbing work without permit means trouble; - in general it is hard to recover the cost of repairs by increased sale price. In MA I have seen many houses otherwise described as "dumps" sell for minimal discounts. I purchased such a piece of art a couple of years ago. It may take longer, but the time to sell is now; - doing a major DIY rehab under the best of circumstances is a headache. It is next to impossible when somebody in the household is recovering from an illness and needs peace and quiet. Also, it is usually the second or third rehab that comes out "right".
--

EJ
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Is replacing carpet easy? Oh I think you forgot the chalkline for the roofing. ares
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On Sat, 22 May 2004 09:39:03 -0500, "Steve B."

to help those who are poor or elderly and can not help themselves.NOT to help someone who cannot get a loan because they mis-managed their finances and took out bankrupties thus causing the rest of us who are financially responsible, to pay for their debts with higher interest rates!
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Any charity or school that provides a service such as this should loose its tax exempt status. It is not the role of a charity or school to enhance the market value of an asset so that the owner of that asset can obtain a larger profit from its sale. If she were to deed all or a portion of the property to them so that they would profit it would be a different situation.
To even think of doing this is absurd.
RB
Steve B. wrote:

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In this situation, if a charity makes a profit, it is OK, but if they do not, it is bad?
[snip]
Sincerely,
Gene Wirchenko
Computerese Irregular Verb Conjugation: I have preferences. You have biases. He/She has prejudices.
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On Sat, 22 May 2004 09:39:03 -0500, someone wrote:

If the home needs extensive repairs, then it needs them even if she planned to keep it.
If she wants to sell it, sell it as-is (for a lower price).
Does she owe more than the home is worth in its present condition? That's actually a third problem, having borrowed too much. (That sort of thing is how people end up bankrupt.)
Why would she qualify for charitable programs, is she actually POOR or just has bad credit (not necessarily the same thing either). I don't think a charity would look kindly on fixing someone's house for free so that they could sell it for more $.
If she owes more than it is worth, she may need her attorney to talk to the bank about taking a short sale or she'll walk. She already has bad credit from bankruptcy so she doesn't have a lot else to lose.
-v.
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<< Inexpensive house repairs >><BR><BR>
That's called an oxymoron down here. zemedelec
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