Indoor painting and pregnancy

My daughter wants to do some indoor painting and she's about 5 months into her pregnancy. How dangerous are the latex paint fumes for this situation? Is there any type of resonably priced mask that can filter out these fumes?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I can't recall ever seeing any warnings regarding latex paint and pregnancy. Oil yes, latex no.
For everyone's peace of mind and safety suggest that she ask her Doctor.
Colbyt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Probably also adequate to call the info/support phone number on the can. Also ask about the appropriate resperator there as well
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you take what the government says, no, don't do it. But they scare you about everything. Even cooking pork http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/pubs/456.pdf
You can get a mask http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId2466-000000429-95071-10000
http://www.epa.gov/kidshometour/products/bpaint.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId2466-000000429-95071-10000
Those masks hide the odor, they do not filter the harful particles. You would need a full respirator mask similar to this http://us.st11.yimg.com/us.st.yimg.com/I/allergybegone_1899_141853 But even this only reduces what you will take in, not be 100% effective.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Google using: latex paint teratogenic

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

and I couldn't do it for her, I'd absolutely insist on thorough ventilation, I'd definitely suggest low-VOC paint (we used a "kids-room" paint by one of the big-name brands that had noticably lower odors), and I'd recommend a mask for organic solvents if possible. (Any mask with a carbon filter should help, but one that's just for dust or particles won't do a thing). Hope this helps, Andy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pj wrote:

Let me tell you this. Professional painters do have severe internal chemical congestions in their liver without exception. What do you think?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Paint is toxic, even latex. Don`t paint, or paint and have her move out. How long? I dont know contact a doctor and paint companies, but I would say with open fresh air, not AC and a closed house one or two weeks. with a closed house maybe a month. I used to paint for a living, even latex makes you sick. Just read a paint can label, it has warnings about breathing vapor, sure it dries fast, but as it cures it releases chemicals and with modern chemistry and ever improving paints you have no idea what is in paint.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tony Hwang wrote:

IMO, comparing a professional (who is exposed constantly to all kinds of paint fumes, scraped paint dust and other stuff 50 hours a week, 52 weeks a year to) an amateur (who spends two hours painting her bedroom) is dumb.
Assuming it's latex paint, tell her to keep the area well ventilated (i.e. put a box fan blowing out in a window in the room - I wouldn't recommend her painting a small closet with the door closed.) and take a break every hour for fresh air. She'll be fine. CHECK THE CAN FOR WARNINGS FIRST.
Doug
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think most painters use oil paint a lot of the time, enough painters enough of the time to give the results you describe.
Whether latex is poisonous is another question.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Even if the area is well ventilated, and she's wearing a mask, etc...is that REALLY something you want to take a chance on? Is painting the room REALLY more important than the possible health implications for her unborn child??
~Shelly
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pj wrote:

When I read your post, I decided to check out the MSDS sheet for one common flat latex paint. Looks like the most serious hazard is in the dust from sanding dry latex paint. Personally, I would paint with good ventilation and forget about it. The major paint brands have websites with their products and MSDS sheets listing hazards and protective measures.
There are lots of home maint. products that are hazardous - dust from paints, patching and filling compounds, that are issues for chronic exposure and can cause lung disease. A simple dust mask can be used for these compounds. A heavy duty respirator can impair air flow, and that probably would not be a good choice for a pregnant woman.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I would think that latex paint in a well ventilated area should be fine, but check and see what the paint can says and what the manufacturers website also says.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pj wrote:

Well, I seem to recall a paint that claimed to release very little VOC's I am not sure if its on the market. All paint releases bad chemicals into the air. If you can smell it, your breathing them. How much damage if any to the fetus is anyones guess. Why chance it?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.