Indiana house exdplosion update

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How can you say it's going to be very hard to prove when you don't have any idea of what the actual evidence is? They could for example have already found a timer or other device used for ignition and have videos from the hardware store when the arsonist bought it. Or they could have witnesses who knew it was being planned and what they were up to. Most criminals are a lot dumber than you think.
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wrote in message

high
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<<How can you say it's going to be very hard to prove when you don't have any idea of what the actual evidence is? >>
Because my dad was a forensic engineer who testified in a number of fire cases. From that experience I can safely conclude that such cases are hard to make. Even when they are won, they are often reversed on appeal when the furor has died down and the case is examined dispassionately.
Fires destroy crucial evidence. Gas explosions even more so. Fire and rescue crews comb through the debris, moving evidence and destroying the evidentiary chain of custody. Neighbors rummage through the area, further clouding the value of evidence collected afterwards. I don't need to know what this case's particulars are to know how hard these cases are to make in general just because of how they unfold.
<<They could for example have already found a timer or other device used for ignition and have videos from the hardware store when the arsonist bought it. Or they could have witnesses who knew it was being planned and what they were up to.>>
They could have found a video the perp made of him setting up a timed ignitor, but it's not likely. All of what you suggest is possible. But compared to a 7-11 robbery homicide with ballistics evidence, CCTV footage of the perp with the gun, witnesses, etc. an arson case is hard to prove unless you have direct evidence of the sort you mentioned.
Even if such equipment is found, you have to prove intent in a criminal trial, and that's where things get sticky. Jurors know witnesses, especially those getting a deal from the DA, can be coerced. They know that many gas explosions have happened without any malice involved. They probably know the gas company and city are looking hard to make sure they're not blamed for the incident through some sort of negligence.
These are almost always hard cases to make. I agree, there are exceptions. I saw a clip on TV from a CCTV camera that captured a man throwing a Molatov cocktail at a store window but the bottle bounced back and engulfed him in flames. That's a much easier case to make than this one where the alleged perps were out of state and didn't end up in the ER covered with the smell of gasoline and all their hair burned off.
<Most criminals are a lot dumber than you think.>
Don't worry, I never underestimate stupidity, either from criminals, DAs or Usenet posters. (-:
-- Bobby G.
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Actually it would be VERY easy to set up a "deliberate" gas explsion.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

And it is looking more and more like it was deliberate.
--
America is at that awkward stage. It's too late
to work within the system, but too early to shoot
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On 11/20/2012 2:54 AM, harry wrote:

Ah, this brings back memories. I grew up in a perfectly respectable middle-class neighborhood. But one of the neighbors, who owned a well-known supper club, got sent up after he was convicted of engineering a gas leak ("faulty furnace") explosion that burned down his house. Turned out his restaurant business was in trouble, and he needed the insurance money.
Thirty years later there was another house that blew up and burned in an adjacent community. The homeowner was hospitalized in critical condition and later died from his burns. His girlfriend and daughter weren't home at the time, fortunately. Turned out the homeowner was my former neighbor's son, who was experiencing financial difficulties. He'd gone into the basement to rig the furnace for an explosion/fire, and miscalculated. He didn't get out of the house in time.
Like father, like son...
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On 11-20-2012 07:48, Moe DeLoughan wrote:

Kills himself trying to do what put his father in prison.
Intelligence sure runs in that family.
--
Wes Groleau

From the cowardice that shrinks from new truth,
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On 11/20/2012 7:33 PM, Wes Groleau wrote:

Particularly since the family name and the local memory of his dad's misdeed caused the investigators to immediately note the curious coincidence, and shortly thereafter find the evidence substantiating their suspicion.
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On 11/20/2012 2:54 AM, harry wrote:

Easily done with a common barbeque grill propane tank. Don't ask me how I know this. ^_^
TDD
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Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Just remember that I was the first one here to speculate it was done intentionally - for financial reasons.

Did it have "Flowers by Irene" painted on the side?
http://i3.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/original/000/183/841/flowers%20by%20irene.jpg

What about a search for the American Way?

I'm glad the cat was safe.
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