Increase water pressure in old neighbor hood home

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a home full of old galvanized is not a isolated problem.
in such cases your better off replacing the lines on your schedule, than waiting for the flood that will certinally come.
my best friend said I am a patient person, i dont care how long it takes to fill the tub, a trickle doesnt bother me in the least:)
but after his 8 or 9th leak he began the all copper project:(
meanwhile the repeated water leaks did a good bit of damage to his home.
PEX is great, cheap, easy to work with, no tees in walls etc. less chance for leaks freeze tolerant..
flexible around obstructions.....
try it its great
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So he has low pressure in ONE run of pipe to a shower and it _isn't_ an isolated problem? Weird.
Harry K
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well my buddy who had the leaky galvanized lines said at first only the bathroom is effected, probably because it was on the 2nd floor so pressure and flow were a little less.
then the problem became more widespread, and the leaks began....
its altogheter possible the OP here has poor flow everywhere from interior pipe rust but has adjusted, its now getting worse, and most noiticeable at that one fixture
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So he should replace all his pipe because you had a buddy that had a problem with his pipe? Probably ought to tear down and rebuild his desk too, huh?
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He probably didn't even have that buddy. He just heard about it from the friend of a neighbor who heard it at the local bar :).
Harry K
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no it was my best friend who absolutely said i am not replacing the lines....
after many leaks he finally gave up and installed all copper.
he hates home repairs
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no he will likely need to replace all his pipes because they are galvanized steel, and over 50 years old.
thats a common fail time for galvanized. he has now been informed leaks are likely coming, and they can do lots of damage...
espically if a leak occurs while he is on vacation, best to turn main off when away.
adding a boost pump is a bad idea in more than one way. disturbing the existing lines will likely cause leaks and even if it doesnt higher pressures can.
time to shop for friends who have used pex or plumbers in area. a replumbing is coming.
wait till he sees the tiny passage left on the inside of his galvanized, it will be very small, the vast majority scaley rust...
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You seem to be psychic. Somehow you just _know_ that his pipes are corroded. Must be nice to be able to do that. I have a house that was built back in the 40s. Bought it in 76. Replaced all iron pipe in the 80s - it was not corroded - replaced due to a total rebuild and floor plan rearangement (added an 18x30' additon).
In this area buried iron pipe has limited life, the soil eats it. I have dug up pipe that was double in size from rust with the interior still clean.
But please do continue with all your assumptions - they are good for laughs.
Back to the subject. It is one run. Sensible persons would examine that run for the problem (probably a clogged shower head). Only if that inspection showed corroded pipe as the problem would a sensible person set out to replace all the pipe in the house.
Harry K
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On 2/24/2011 11:30 AM, Harry K wrote: (snip)

Hard to say without seeing it. And while I am no plumber, I have personally seen multiple instances of galv iron water systems, where once you disturb it, and stress joints and runs further upstream or downstream, they start leaking.
I've never used Pex, but have heard good things about it, especially once it got past the growing pains of the early fittings. I've long been of the opinion that if you can afford it, dedicated runs are the way to go, with a labeled shutoff valve manifold to shut off each run as needed if there are problems. Tees and other joints behind solid walls are a pain in the ass. And of course, when you are designing, back all wet walls up to a closet and build in access hatches from the start.
--
aem sends...

--

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wrote:

You need 2 wrenches to work galvanized. Got no idea what you mean by "disturbing" or "stressing" it. I could guess, but why be impolite? I'm not saying anybody should choose it over copper or PEX, but for me galvanized is like riding a bicycle. Never even give a thought to galvanized joints leaking.
--Vic
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wrote:

old galvanized fittings tend to rust and weld together, no matter how careful you are its easy to twist a connected line and cause another leak either immediately or in the future.....
old galavanized is generally packed with rust, making you wonder how water even managed to get thru the rust
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Keep riding that hobby horse!
Harry K
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On Thu, 24 Feb 2011 20:44:27 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

First off, I've only dealt with Lake Michigan water. That's all I'm talking about. Probably pretty much the same water as in the other Great Lakes. Don't know how many millions use that water. But I'm just talking about Chicago area Lake Michigan water. It' s not rust restricting the pipes. It's scale. Deposited minerals. Some rust, but mostly scale.
It ain't "easy to twist a connected line" unless you just don't know how to handle two wrenches at the same time. Fittings don't "tend to rust and weld together." I've taken apart plenty of 50 year old fittings and only the first 2-3 threads were rusted. In the steel mills we would routinely hit an old threaded end with a wire brush, re-dope, and crank it back in. When I re-piped the 50 year old galvanized in my last house 30 years ago I left all the old galvanized pipes in the plumbing wall - they weren't scaled up - and had no trouble connecting the new feeds to them. Nothing has leaked since.
Looks like the water is different where you're at. I can see examples of what you said all over the net, so I don't doubt that galvanized will rust and scale up faster in some places. Around here that takes +50 years.
Here's the funny thing I found when I looking around the net. It looks like copper leaks more than galvanized and doesn't last as long. Pinhole leaks, different types of corrosion, joints starting to leak after repairing other leaks, etc. It doesn't scale up. Looks like if it could scale, leaks and corrosion would kill it before that would happen anyway. Didn't do a "scientific" survey, but copper sure doesn't look good. I was surprised by the copper horror stories. Kind of thought copper was the cat's meow.
I considered using copper when I re-piped my last house, but since I cut/threaded a lot of pipe and had the tools I went with galvanized. Hadn't sweated copper either, and still haven't. Like I said, galvanized is like riding a bike to me. Now I wouldn't even consider copper if I have to re-pipe this house. Galvanized or PEX.. But I don't know if PEX meets code here.
--Vic
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wrote:

I repiped (total remodel right down to the studs) with CPVC/PVC. Simple, cheap, no special tools, easy to change, patch etc. All that is needed is a hacksaw, can of glue and a handful of fitting that are cheap, cheap, cheap. Need to change or add something in middle of run? 2 minute job of which 30 seconds is waiting for the glue to dry.
Harry K
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ahh the copper thieves will be disappointed.
my dad owned rentals in phoenix, after having copper lines repeatedly stolen he went to CPVC, no more missing lines.....
one time someone ripped all the wiring out of the house.
after that he started selling off his rentals.
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wrote:

I too have had my goes with galvanised. Unless the pipe itself is rotted there is no problem EXCEPT for undoing one my dad put together. His method of tightening a joint was "as tight as it will go plus half a turn". My 24" pipe wrench got lots of use :).
Harry K
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On Fri, 25 Feb 2011 10:00:32 -0800 (PST), Harry K

Bet none of the joints he cranked on leaked (-: It's easier to undertighten galvanized than to overtighten it. Seems whenever I did work with a helper who hadn't done galvanized they were leery of overtightening, until I put another turn or two on it. Then they quickly got the idea. It's really the easiest type of plumbing once you get the hang of it.
--Vic
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PEX is far easier snakes easily around obstructions:)
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On Fri, 25 Feb 2011 12:12:16 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

Right. Should have said "rigid, and not including PVC" (-: I'll look at PEX first if I have to do any supply plumbing around here. Everybody seems to talk it up. Well, I just did a google search for PEX leaks. Learned a bit about it. Looks like it's not all it's cracked up to be. Expands too much, needs too many tie-downs, gets all snaky looking, leaks, rodents can bite right through it, etc, etc. And nobody knows how long it will last. Don't think I would ever use it to replace existing piping runs. Might be useful for some applications, but not any house I ever lived in. If I wanted to run water to my detached garage it would work. But I already have a garden hose for that. If I have to open walls to clamp down PEX it would be just as easy for me to use galvanized. No need to snake any piping here. The more I read about copper, PEX, and the rest, the more I like galvanized steel pipe. But maybe I'm crazy.
--Vic
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obviously you havent actually used PEX.
and galvanized would be my dead last choice for water lines, as it rusts inside it can add excess iron and taste to your drinking water..
One big advantage to PEX is homeruns with no Ts etc in walls....fewer joints fewer leak points:)
Good luck trying to resell a home with galvanized, a one foot long piece in a home I sold caused grief...
PEX expands if frozen and doesnt tend to split so a frozen line isnt a replumb job.........
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