Increase water pressure in old neighbor hood home

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Is there a way to increase the water pressure in an older home ?
Home was built in 1955 using galvanized pipes.
It also has 2 water heaters, one supplies just the washing machine.
Thanks, Andy
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The pressure is not the issue. The problem is delivery of VOLUME at the faucet. By now, most 50 year old pipes have been replaced when a substantial volume deficit is apparent.
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City water? There is no practical way to increase the pressure beyond what is fed to the house. It can be done with tanks and pumps though. Expensive and may not solve the real problem.
Given that you have old galvanized pipe, there could be a lot of flow restriction from corrosion buildup. My first thought is to replace it with Pex. I'd also check on the condition of the feed from the street. No matter what you do in the house if that line is partly closed from buildup, nothing inside will improve.
You really need an inspection by someone that knows what to look for and that can put a pressure gauge on the line.
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its probably past time to replace all the water lines......
PEX is excellent and cheap too, the incoming water line may be clogged too espically if its lead..
the thing about galvanized, it will leak. fix one leak get 2 more later.
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.
Wouldn't that be a rather large major job ?
Tearing out sheetrock to replace the pipes, etc.
Andy
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On 2/23/2011 7:12 AM, Andy wrote:

An analogy: You have four worn out flat tires on your car, it just doesn't perform as well as it used to. You could likely find a solution such as fitting a much bigger engine or even something more complicated and still never get a good result or you could replace the tires.
There isn't any real fix for old galvanized piping except to replace it.
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...
Again a bunch of you jump to conclusions without enough facts to support them. Are the galvanized pipes really his problem? We don't know because he did not report the actual pressure he has. Instead suggest he do pressure and flow tests just like a plumber would do if called out to the house with this problem. All it takes is a pressure guage and a 5 gallon bucket. Who knows, he might just have a reglator in the system. somewhere
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On 2/23/2011 8:44 AM, jamesgangnc wrote:

I have never seen galvanized pipe that has been in service for > 50 years (and often a lot less) that wasn't almost completely obstructed so I think it is a pretty safe conclusion.
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wrote:

They close up, but mostly at the turns and after the HW tank. I've had galvanized in all my homes and never saw a leak. This house has 50 years old galvanized and the pressure is fine. I re-piped the scaled up 60 year-old galvanized in my last place, a 2-flat. Didn't bother replacing the verticals in the plumbing wall, as they looked good inside. Worst parts were the first el in the supply, and all the HW supply up to the veriticals. That was 30 years ago and I still have family living there with 90 year old galvanized in the walls and good pressure and no leaks. If I ever get a low flow problem in this house I know where to look. I've always been on Lake Michigan water, and I understand galvanized might have more problems elsewhere. The OP has a problem with one shower. He should find out why that shower is slow. A sink faucet screen with some pieces of scale in it can almost stop the flow, so the same can happen with a showerhead. Don't know if he has a tub shower and the tub faucets run strong. He didn't say. That's par for the course.
--Vic
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Of course, all of this depends on the quality of water to begin with. That 90 year old pipe may be corroded in 2 years in another place in the country.
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On 2/23/2011 6:12 AM, Andy wrote:

all depends on the house. I have no pipes covered by sheetrock. A two story? Yes, it probably would. But pex is pretty workable. If you can pull romex through a given area, you can probably pull pex through the same place. If a single level with a basement or crawl space, then it ain't nothing but a thing to do.
--
Steve Barker
remove the "not" from my address to email
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...
some jobs just must be done, once you get enough leaks you will understand:(
PEX is DIY friendly, just do a run or two at a time
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We had our pipes replaced a few months ago using a company called Repipe Specialists. They knew exactly what walls to open and where. They tore out the galvanized and installed copper--in one day--in out split level with 2.5 bathrooms. We had them install all new faucets as well. After the city inspector checked it out they came back and patched the walls ready for painting.
My main issue was dealing with ceramic tile. They had to remove tile in one bathroom and I could not find new tile that exactly matched. Rather than tear all the walls out I elected to remove about 40 tiles so they could be reused. Using a Multi-Max and heat gun I was able to save almost all the tiles for reuse. I bought a few that were a close match for use behind the toilet. The 60 year old tiles came off rather easily. Those that had been taken down and replaced 20 years ago for drywall repair were harder to remove.
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Booster pump and tank. Shouldn't run more than about $200.
Harry K
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Thanks.
Your idea brought up an idea.
The pressure is only an issue with one shower.
Maybe a booster pump and tank for it?
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increasing the pressure will no doubt increase the risks for leaks....
since the problem is just one shower.
does the shower head have a flow restrictor in it?
is poor flow just hot or just cold?
could be a clogged shower head, galvanized generates particles of rust that can clog things.
bad shower valve somehow?
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The OP obviously doesn't have a clue, he should call a real plumber.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:
[snip]

My shower has been slow, because of a deteriorated washer in the hot water valve. Bits of rubber would break off and got stuck in the shower head.
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.us
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Andy wrote:

Hey Andy, have you checked to see if that showerhead is clogged?
Or is the flow slow from faucets around the house too?
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
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No, if you have only an isolated problem, you find what the problem is and fix that.
Harry K
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